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American Sign Language

NEWS
December 10, 1991 | From Times Wire Services
After a complicated courtship, Koko the "talking gorilla" is finally getting a mate. The prospective partner, Ndume, is a gorilla from the Cincinnati Zoo. He will arrive at the 6.5-acre Gorilla Foundation in Woodside tonight. After 30 days in isolation as a health precaution, the two will be introduced. "It was a long struggle," said primatologist Penny Patterson, "but it looks like the beginning of what we hope will be a productive relationship."
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 27, 2001
Re "Controversial Head of School for Deaf Removed," June 21: As one who, after a lifetime with hearing keen enough to work as a professional musician, must now rely on state-of-the-art hearing aids to pick up on ordinary conversations, I find the California School for the Deaf's efforts to lump all of its students (both actually deaf and merely hard of hearing) into one group puzzling, insofar as their education is concerned. Whatever happened to the old-fashioned idea that each student is an individual whose individual needs and capabilities must be taken into account?
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 14, 1991
A vaudeville-style variety show performed entirely in American Sign Language is scheduled for Friday and Saturday at Saddleback College's McKinney Theatre. Called "Quiet Zone Theater," performers from Saddleback, Golden West and Rancho Santiago colleges will do original skits and interpretations of popular songs. Interpreters will be available for the hearing audience.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 19, 1991
With our news dominated by wars and all kinds of violence, it was very refreshing to read The Times Orange County Section on May 7 and the stories of three people, one being Andrea Mathews, who was given the Foster Child Advocacy Award for her unselfish and caring work with children. The other was about Share Our Selves founder Jean Forbath, who will step down after having devoted so much of her time to help destitute people, and who still will participate in many worthwhile projects.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 12, 1994
A gunman opened fire on a couple in Pico Rivera apparently because the two had exchanged a series of hand signals that may have been interpreted as the flashing of gang signs. Los Angeles County sheriff's officials said Friday that the gunman fired at a 22-year-old woman as she and her 25-year-old boyfriend sat in the parking lot of El Rancho High School on Feb. 4. The woman was wounded in the right cheek and shoulder.
NEWS
December 7, 1997 | TARA MEYER, ASSOCIATED PRESS
Chantek, a giant ball of orange fur, puts a fist to his chin--sign language for orange. "Give me the cup, Chantek. Then I'll give you an orange," trainer Lyn Miles signs back, motioning to the plastic juice cup the 450-pound orangutan has nabbed from her. He repeats the sign for the orange, again without success, then turns away. "That's the 'No way, lady,' response," said Carol Flammer of Zoo Atlanta. Chantek is the latest, possibly most fascinating addition to the zoo's primate group.
NEWS
March 22, 1991 | THOMAS H. MAUGH II, TIMES SCIENCE WRITER
The sounds of "goo-goo" and "dada" that young children make when they begin babbling at about 7 months of age are also made by deaf infants in what scientists say is sign language, according to Canadian researchers. This "manual babbling" is not simply the random formation of signs, but instead reflects the strict linguistic rules associated with vocal babbling, the researchers report today in the journal Science.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 23, 2012 | By Karen Wada, Special to the Los Angeles Times
Nearly a decade ago, an improbable dream came true for Deaf West Theatre and its founder, Ed Waterstreet. The small, L.A.-based company went to Broadway with its signed and spoken version of the musical "Big River: The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn. " Even as he savored their success, Waterstreet had another dream - creating an original musical inspired by Edmond Rostand's "Cyrano de Bergerac. " What better tale for his theater to tell than one that explores the universal desire to express oneself?
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