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BUSINESS
June 13, 2012 | By Ronald D. White
The chief economist for the American Trucking Assn. says that job turnover rates for drivers at large, interstate fleets rose 2% in the first quarter of 2012 to 90%. That's the highest job turnover rate since the first quarter of 2008. But don't worry, it's apparently a good sign for the strength of the economy. The economist, Bob Costello, was referring to the latest numbers in his monthly Trucking Activity Report. Costello's report also said there was a huge, first-quarter employment turnover increase of 16%, to 71%, among smaller fleets with less than $30 million in annual revenue.
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BUSINESS
June 14, 2013 | By Ricardo Lopez, Los Angeles Times
The U.S. Supreme Court dismantled part of the Port of Los Angeles' anti-smog program Thursday, ruling that trucking companies don't have to affix "How am I driving?" placards to their vehicles or have off-site parking plans to haul goods in and out of the seaport. The ruling is part of a years-long battle between the American Trucking Assn. and the city of Los Angeles, which operates the port. The high court struck down the placard and parking provisions of the program but sent part of the case back to a lower appellate court for further review.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 10, 2008 | Louis Sahagun
A federal court judge Tuesday denied a trucking association's request that she halt key elements of a landmark program designed to help reduce pollution at the Los Angeles-Long Beach ports complex. Granting the request "would not serve the public interest in any significant way," U.S. District Judge Christina Snyder wrote in a 26-page ruling. She said she was not persuaded by the American Trucking Assn.'s argument that big-rig drivers would experience significant hardships if forced to enter into new concession agreements required for them to service the adjacent ports of Los Angeles and Long Beach.
BUSINESS
June 13, 2012 | By Ronald D. White
The chief economist for the American Trucking Assn. says that job turnover rates for drivers at large, interstate fleets rose 2% in the first quarter of 2012 to 90%. That's the highest job turnover rate since the first quarter of 2008. But don't worry, it's apparently a good sign for the strength of the economy. The economist, Bob Costello, was referring to the latest numbers in his monthly Trucking Activity Report. Costello's report also said there was a huge, first-quarter employment turnover increase of 16%, to 71%, among smaller fleets with less than $30 million in annual revenue.
BUSINESS
February 25, 2010 | By Ronald D. White
The Port of Los Angeles' effort to reduce pollution and change the way cargo is hauled to and from its terminal gates survived another court battle Wednesday when a federal appeals panel refused to block one of the plan's most controversial provisions. Three judges from the U.S. 9th Circuit Court of Appeals denied a request for an injunction against the port's plan to require all independent haulers to become employees of approved concessions or trucking companies. The concession plan emerged from the belief that only trucking companies could help drivers buy and maintain new lower-emissions rigs.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 27, 2008 | Phil Willon
Mayor Antonio Villaraigosa signed a law Thursday that will phase out the use of exhaust-spewing diesel trucks carrying cargo from the Port of Los Angeles, part of a larger $1.6-billion clean-air initiative that will affect more than 17,000 older diesel trucks. "This is the most aggressive effort to clean up the air at a port anywhere in the world," Villaraigosa said at a City Hall news conference. "Today, Angelenos can rest assured their children will breath easier and so will their grandchildren," he said.
BUSINESS
January 24, 2012 | By Marc Lifsher
Freight tonnage hauled by U.S. truckers -- a barometer of economic activity -- rose 5.9% last year, the biggest year-over-year annual gain since 1998. Monthly truck tonnage jumped 6.8% in December and .3% in November, the American Trucking Assn. reported Tuesday. Trucking is a good economic indicator because the industry moves 67.2% of all U.S. freight tonnage, about 9 billion tons of goods in 2010, the association said. "While I'm not surprised that tonnage increased in December, I am surprised at the magnitude of the gain," Bob Costello, the association's chief economist, said.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 9, 2008 | Louis Sahagun, Times Staff Writer
A federal court judge in Los Angeles on Monday tentatively denied a trucking association's bid to block a landmark clean-truck program at the nation's busiest port complex. After a 40-minute hearing, U.S. District Judge Christina Snyder said she would probably allow the program to move forward, despite objections from truckers. "The balance of hardships and the public interest tip decidedly in favor of denying the injunction," she said in court. Under the program, the adjacent ports of Los Angeles and Long Beach would upgrade their aging fleet of about 16,800 mostly dilapidated rigs that produce much of the diesel pollution in Southern California.
BUSINESS
September 6, 2008 | Ronald D. White, Times Staff Writer
Following weeks of worry about whether they could meet their own deadlines, Los Angeles and Long Beach port officials said Friday that they were closing in on having enough trucking companies lined up to get their clean-air programs off the ground in October. The landmark anti-pollution efforts seek initially to rid the nation's two busiest container ports of the worst polluting trucks, which are at least 20 years old. Both ports' plans, which take different approaches to how the truck fleets will be organized, still face many hurdles, including a federal lawsuit.
BUSINESS
June 14, 2013 | By Ricardo Lopez, Los Angeles Times
The U.S. Supreme Court dismantled part of the Port of Los Angeles' anti-smog program Thursday, ruling that trucking companies don't have to affix "How am I driving?" placards to their vehicles or have off-site parking plans to haul goods in and out of the seaport. The ruling is part of a years-long battle between the American Trucking Assn. and the city of Los Angeles, which operates the port. The high court struck down the placard and parking provisions of the program but sent part of the case back to a lower appellate court for further review.
BUSINESS
January 24, 2012 | By Marc Lifsher
Freight tonnage hauled by U.S. truckers -- a barometer of economic activity -- rose 5.9% last year, the biggest year-over-year annual gain since 1998. Monthly truck tonnage jumped 6.8% in December and .3% in November, the American Trucking Assn. reported Tuesday. Trucking is a good economic indicator because the industry moves 67.2% of all U.S. freight tonnage, about 9 billion tons of goods in 2010, the association said. "While I'm not surprised that tonnage increased in December, I am surprised at the magnitude of the gain," Bob Costello, the association's chief economist, said.
BUSINESS
February 25, 2010 | By Ronald D. White
The Port of Los Angeles' effort to reduce pollution and change the way cargo is hauled to and from its terminal gates survived another court battle Wednesday when a federal appeals panel refused to block one of the plan's most controversial provisions. Three judges from the U.S. 9th Circuit Court of Appeals denied a request for an injunction against the port's plan to require all independent haulers to become employees of approved concessions or trucking companies. The concession plan emerged from the belief that only trucking companies could help drivers buy and maintain new lower-emissions rigs.
BUSINESS
January 9, 2010 | By Ronald D. White
Not too long ago, the 10,500-acre complex at the southern tip of Los Angeles County wasn't just the home of the nation's busiest seaports, it was the graveyard where old trucks went to die. Dented, rusting 1988-and-older rigs hauled cargo containers to and from the ports of Los Angeles and Long Beach, earning the harbor the nickname of "diesel death zone." On Jan. 1, the neighboring ports cruised past a major pollution-fighting milestone, banning trucks made before 1994 and those that don't meet at least 2004 emissions standards -- trucks such as the 15-year-old Freightliner once owned by Guido Perez.
BUSINESS
April 6, 2009 | Ronald D. White
The cargo is pretty much the same -- a rusty 40-foot container filled on a recent morning with 50,000 pounds of Asia-bound hay cubes. The trip on a recent Saturday also was unchanged: the few miles between the 51-year-old Los Angeles Harbor Grain Terminal and the TraPac Inc. terminal at the Port of Los Angeles. But that's where the similarities end. Heriberto S. Perez Jr.
BUSINESS
January 7, 2009 | Ronald D. White
In early December, trucker Joe Rini learned that his own personal recession had just gotten worse. One of his best clients called about a load of building materials that needed to travel to the Pacific Northwest, Northern California and Colorado -- normally a $4,400 job. Rini offered to do it for $3,400. But before Rini's truck had arrived to pick up the load, the Cleveland-area customer of more than four years called back. Another trucker had offered to do the job for $400 less.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 10, 2008 | Louis Sahagun
A federal court judge Tuesday denied a trucking association's request that she halt key elements of a landmark program designed to help reduce pollution at the Los Angeles-Long Beach ports complex. Granting the request "would not serve the public interest in any significant way," U.S. District Judge Christina Snyder wrote in a 26-page ruling. She said she was not persuaded by the American Trucking Assn.'s argument that big-rig drivers would experience significant hardships if forced to enter into new concession agreements required for them to service the adjacent ports of Los Angeles and Long Beach.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 19, 1986 | A. A. SMYSER, Associated Press
Some people find it incongruous that Hawaii, separated from the West Coast by 2,400 miles of open ocean, still is included in the federal interstate highway system. Maybe some also will find it incongruous that the new national chairman of the American Trucking Assn. is from Hawaii. He is Robert E. Lewis, 52, who was installed recently in Washington, D.C., at a convention attended by 3,800 truckers.
BUSINESS
January 9, 2010 | By Ronald D. White
Not too long ago, the 10,500-acre complex at the southern tip of Los Angeles County wasn't just the home of the nation's busiest seaports, it was the graveyard where old trucks went to die. Dented, rusting 1988-and-older rigs hauled cargo containers to and from the ports of Los Angeles and Long Beach, earning the harbor the nickname of "diesel death zone." On Jan. 1, the neighboring ports cruised past a major pollution-fighting milestone, banning trucks made before 1994 and those that don't meet at least 2004 emissions standards -- trucks such as the 15-year-old Freightliner once owned by Guido Perez.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 9, 2008 | Louis Sahagun, Times Staff Writer
A federal court judge in Los Angeles on Monday tentatively denied a trucking association's bid to block a landmark clean-truck program at the nation's busiest port complex. After a 40-minute hearing, U.S. District Judge Christina Snyder said she would probably allow the program to move forward, despite objections from truckers. "The balance of hardships and the public interest tip decidedly in favor of denying the injunction," she said in court. Under the program, the adjacent ports of Los Angeles and Long Beach would upgrade their aging fleet of about 16,800 mostly dilapidated rigs that produce much of the diesel pollution in Southern California.
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