Advertisement
 
YOU ARE HERE: LAT HomeCollectionsAmericans Colombia
IN THE NEWS

Americans Colombia

NEWS
February 18, 1990 | From Times staff and Wire reports
Leftist guerrillas said they will free two American hostages if U.S. diplomats negotiate unspecified conditions for their release, a Bogota newspaper reported. The fate of a third American hostage was unknown. The men were captured last week as President Bush met in Colombia with three South American leaders to discuss ways to stop drug trafficking.
Advertisement
NEWS
February 16, 1990 | From Times Wire Services
As President Bush attended a drug summit in Cartagena on Thursday, guerrillas kidnaped an American priest in Cali, the third American seized by rebels this week. Shortly afterward, the self-styled National Liberation Army (ELN), a Cuban-line guerrilla band blamed for all three abductions, issued a statement declaring that "every U.S. interest in Colombia" has been declared a target. The State Department identified the kidnaped priest as Father Francis A.
NEWS
February 14, 1990
A leftist rebel group kidnapped two U.S. citizens in the Medellin area to protest President Bush's participation in the Cartagena drug summit, but one of the Americans was released Tuesday, Radio RCN reported. The radio network, quoting authorities, said businessman James Donnelly of Detroit was freed Tuesday evening. His kidnapers identified themselves as members of the National Liberation Army.
NEWS
September 8, 1989 | From Times Wire Services
Some Americans began leaving Colombia in the face of an expected backlash as the government pressed its war on drug traffickers in several ways. Minister of Government Orlando Vasquez asked Congress to adopt legislation making permanent the emergency measures decreed by President Virgilio Barco Vargas last month to combat the drug lords. These include the extradition of traffickers wanted for trial in the United States.
NEWS
August 31, 1989 | WILLIAM R. LONG and KENNETH FREED, Times Staff Writers
In new signs of concern Wednesday over violence by ruthless drug traffickers, the U.S. Embassy ordered American dependents of its employees to leave Colombia, and 48 American exchange students departed for home. In Medellin, where a series of bomb explosions have been blamed on drug traffickers, the mayor imposed a curfew from 10 p.m. to 6 a.m.
NEWS
February 7, 1987 | Associated Press
Americans kept their children home from school, canceled parties and hired bodyguards Friday in fear of reprisals because of the extradition of drug kingpin Carlos Lehder to the United States for trial. Some U.S. citizens, citing drug traffickers' threats to kill five Americans for every Colombian extradited, said they were sending their families out of the country. Police, meanwhile, announced the arrest of three more men whose extradition is sought by the United States.
Los Angeles Times Articles
|