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BUSINESS
August 12, 1991 | KARL SCHOENBERGER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Do we Americans really dislike the Japanese? What cause do we have for malice? Who among us has been truly threatened, wronged or otherwise hurt as a consequence of Japan's formidable economic power? These questions have been haunting the rarefied debate over U.S.-Japan relations for years, and now a congressional panel is offering a new high-resolution focus for the quandary: racial bias in the workplace.
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BUSINESS
January 12, 2001
First American Corp. in Santa Ana, one of the nation's largest title insurance firms, said Thursday that a subsidiary has acquired a New Jersey firm that provides background checks on job applicants and current employees. First American said in a press release that its HireCheck Inc. unit acquired Pretiem Corp. Financial terms were not released. Pretiem expands HireCheck's employment-screening services in the mid-Atlantic region and among the maritime and energy industries.
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BUSINESS
May 23, 1990 | JAMES RISEN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Several Japanese corporations acknowledged Tuesday that they have moved to segregate their American and Japanese staffs by nationality so that American employees report only to other Americans, while Japanese nationals report only to other Japanese officials. The segregation policy at one major company, Nissan Motor, was revealed in internal company documents obtained by The Times.
BUSINESS
February 7, 1995 | From Reuters
Many of us depend on outside help to keep the house, mind the kids or meet the needs of aging relatives. But pay their taxes? That's something else. It took Nannygate, when several top government appointees found their ways blocked because they neglected to pay taxes or other required benefits for household employees, to give the matter new significance. The issue played a key role in the failed nominations of Zoe Baird and Kimba Wood for U.S.
BUSINESS
December 2, 1989 | BRUCE HOROVITZ, TIMES STAFF WRITER
One of the top-ranking American executives at Hakuhodo Advertising America Inc. said Friday that he was fired "without merit" and may sue the company for what he called a "history of discrimination against Americans" at the agency. "I deeply regret having to do this," said Kent Charles Cooper, vice president and director of public relations at the Los Angeles office of the Japanese agency. "But I intend to show a long, consistent pattern of discrimination."
BUSINESS
January 12, 2001
First American Corp. in Santa Ana, one of the nation's largest title insurance firms, said Thursday that a subsidiary has acquired a New Jersey firm that provides background checks on job applicants and current employees. First American said in a press release that its HireCheck Inc. unit acquired Pretiem Corp. Financial terms were not released. Pretiem expands HireCheck's employment-screening services in the mid-Atlantic region and among the maritime and energy industries.
NEWS
January 16, 1985 | Associated Press
One American in every 15 now works for some form of government, the Census Bureau reported Tuesday. State governments increased their employee rolls by 7.2% to 3,744,000 between 1977 and 1982, according to the new Compendium of Public Employment published by the bureau. During the same period, the number of people working for local governments grew 0.3% to 9,249,000, while the federal civilian work force held steady at 2,848,000.
BUSINESS
February 7, 1995 | From Reuters
Many of us depend on outside help to keep the house, mind the kids or meet the needs of aging relatives. But pay their taxes? That's something else. It took Nannygate, when several top government appointees found their ways blocked because they neglected to pay taxes or other required benefits for household employees, to give the matter new significance. The issue played a key role in the failed nominations of Zoe Baird and Kimba Wood for U.S.
NATIONAL
October 5, 2003 | Peter G. Gosselin, Times Staff Writer
The Bush administration got a rare piece of economic good news when the Labor Department announced Friday that American employers had added workers last month instead of subtracting them. The sighs of the relief were audible across the capital. "The economy is definitely in a recovery mode," declared Labor Secretary Elaine Chao. "Positive employment growth is exactly what we were looking for," added N. Gregory Mankiw, chairman of the White House Council of Economic Advisors.
BUSINESS
April 27, 2007 | Molly Selvin, Times Staff Writer
Fifteen years after the 1992 riots, South Los Angeles has seen dramatic population shifts -- but frustratingly little economic progress. Latinos are a growing presence in a community that was once the center of African American life. Many middle-class black and Latino families have moved out of the area for better schools and safer streets. Those remaining are disproportionately poorer and have fewer job skills.
BUSINESS
August 12, 1991 | KARL SCHOENBERGER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Do we Americans really dislike the Japanese? What cause do we have for malice? Who among us has been truly threatened, wronged or otherwise hurt as a consequence of Japan's formidable economic power? These questions have been haunting the rarefied debate over U.S.-Japan relations for years, and now a congressional panel is offering a new high-resolution focus for the quandary: racial bias in the workplace.
BUSINESS
May 23, 1990 | JAMES RISEN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Several Japanese corporations acknowledged Tuesday that they have moved to segregate their American and Japanese staffs by nationality so that American employees report only to other Americans, while Japanese nationals report only to other Japanese officials. The segregation policy at one major company, Nissan Motor, was revealed in internal company documents obtained by The Times.
BUSINESS
December 2, 1989 | BRUCE HOROVITZ, TIMES STAFF WRITER
One of the top-ranking American executives at Hakuhodo Advertising America Inc. said Friday that he was fired "without merit" and may sue the company for what he called a "history of discrimination against Americans" at the agency. "I deeply regret having to do this," said Kent Charles Cooper, vice president and director of public relations at the Los Angeles office of the Japanese agency. "But I intend to show a long, consistent pattern of discrimination."
NEWS
January 16, 1985 | Associated Press
One American in every 15 now works for some form of government, the Census Bureau reported Tuesday. State governments increased their employee rolls by 7.2% to 3,744,000 between 1977 and 1982, according to the new Compendium of Public Employment published by the bureau. During the same period, the number of people working for local governments grew 0.3% to 9,249,000, while the federal civilian work force held steady at 2,848,000.
NEWS
September 8, 1989 | WILLIAM J. EATON, Times Staff Writer
In a sweeping expansion of civil rights protections, the Senate late Thursday voted to bar discrimination against 43 million disabled Americans in employment, public transportation services, public accommodations and telecommunication services. The landmark measure was adopted on a vote of 76 to 8 after a day of debate.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 9, 1987 | JACK SHEINKMAN, Jack Sheinkman is the president of the Amalgamated Clothing and Textile Workers Union, AFL-CIO.
Secretary of Labor William E. Brock III recently had the audacity to tell Congress that 6.7 million U.S. workers really aren't worth more than $3.35 per hour. In case you're curious, that comes out to $6,968 per average work year, or about 20% below the poverty level for a family of three. In contrast, no one in this Administration said "too much" when America's highest-paid executive, Lee Iacocca, received more than $20 million last year.
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