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NEWS
February 25, 1986 | BOB BAKER and PATT MORRISON, Times Staff Writers
Like their countrymen half a world away, many Filipino-Americans in Los Angeles rejoiced today at the news that Ferdinand E. Marcos had resigned his presidency during the night and was at a U.S. air base, poised to leave the island nation he had ruled, sometimes harshly, for 20 years.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 4, 2002 | SHARON BERNSTEIN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The Rev. Frederick Murph of Brookins Community AME Church on Wednesday became the second African American leader in as many days to say he will consider supporting secession by the San Fernando Valley, harbor area and Hollywood. Murph, who has criticized Mayor James K. Hahn for his failure to support Police Chief Bernard C. Parks for a second term, said he was forming an exploratory committee to present information about the secession movements to African Americans throughout the city.
NATIONAL
June 5, 2005 | From a Times Staff Writer
The Hillman Foundation has announced the winners of the 2005 Sidney Hillman Awards in New York, honoring print and broadcast journalists and authors who investigate issues related to social justice and progressive public policy. This year's award winners are Jason DeParle for his book "American Dream: Three Women, Ten Kids, and a Nation's Drive to End Welfare"; Sarah Karp for the article "Our Next Generation" in the Chicago Reporter; Peter G.
OPINION
May 12, 1996
I was disappointed by "Riots' Effects Are Still Smoldering in Koreatown" (April 29). The article's overemphasis on the generation gap among Korean Americans suggested that the main reason first-generation merchants did not recover was due to miscommunication with the "1.5" and second generations. Hundreds of younger Korean Americans began working for their communities as a direct result of the civil unrest. We need to recognize their contributions and encourage their involvement. And to truly understand the problems of the first-generation Korean American merchant, we must dig wider and deeper, for the problems persist and the solutions lie far outside this population.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 8, 1993 | EMILY ADAMS, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Shots were fired into the homes of two Hawaiian Gardens families this week, less than two months after one of the houses was firebombed in an apparent racial attack. Both families, tired of threats, taunts and racial graffiti, plan to move away, they said. No one was injured in the shootings. But to the two African-American families, it was a clear message. They are not wanted in this mostly Latino city, said Joyce Dennis, one of the victims.
NEWS
March 30, 2001 | ERIN TEXEIRA, TIMES STAFF WRITER
African Americans left traditionally black, central-city neighborhoods in the Los Angeles area and moved into newer, outlying suburbs in the 1990s--a pattern that continued from the previous decade and significantly diminished the overall black population in both Los Angeles County and L.A. itself. Tens of thousands of blacks left such cities as Los Angeles and Compton, and similar numbers poured into more northern and eastern suburbs such as Palmdale, Moreno Valley and Lancaster.
NEWS
February 20, 1985 | PENELOPE McMILLAN, Times Staff Writer
Gung hay fat choy! The Chinese new year begins today, celebrated by many of the estimated 100,000 Chinese-Americans in Los Angeles County. As the year 4683, year of the ox in the Chinese lunar calendar, begins, several traditions are followed to clear out the bad luck of the old year and make way for the good luck of the new. Debts are paid, houses are swept clean and special foods prepared. Firecrackers are lighted to ward off evil spirits.
BUSINESS
July 31, 1987
Re: "Death Squads? Could Be," Editorial, July 21: Three times in a row recently, as soon as the Salvadoran calling identified himself, my phone went dead. Whether strange coincidence or surveillance (he has spoken out about human-rights abuses in his own country), this incident gave me a small and unnerving glimpse into the ominous new intimidation confronting Central Americans in Los Angeles. The appearance of death squads on our streets is shocking but hardly surprising.
HEALTH
November 29, 1999 | ROSIE MESTEL
World AIDS Day on Wednesday marks the kickoff of the Los Angeles "HIV. Live With It. Get Tested!" campaign for youth at risk for infection with the virus. The campaign aims to encourage children and young adults ages 13 to 24--especially those from underserved minority groups--to get free, anonymous HIV testing and counseling at one of dozens of testing sites in the L.A. area. Early testing is important, medical experts say.
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