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NEWS
September 20, 2000 | Times Wire Services
A Russian court on Tuesday turned down an appeal for freedom by American Edmond D. Pope, who has been jailed for 5 1/2 months on espionage charges. Pope had asked to be freed so that he could undergo treatment for cancer. But the Moscow city court ruled that the espionage accusation is too serious to warrant freeing him. According to his family, Pope, 54, has a rare form of bone cancer that was in remission when he was arrested. The U.S.
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NEWS
August 30, 2000 | MAURA REYNOLDS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A U.S. businessman at the center of a prolonged and increasingly testy spy scandal is in poor health and could die if Russian officials continue to deny him access to Western medical experts, his wife said Tuesday. Edmond D. Pope, 54, has been jailed here since April 3 on espionage charges for obtaining information about a Russian high-speed torpedo. His wife, Cheryl, was permitted to visit him for two hours Tuesday and described him as "very fragile."
NEWS
April 14, 2000 | Associated Press
Russian authorities said they have charged a former U.S. Navy officer with espionage after holding him in a Moscow prison for more than a week, saying he had tried to obtain military secrets. The U.S. Embassy has named the man as Edmond D. Pope, but Russia has refused to identify him or a Russian arrested as an alleged accomplice. A spokesman with the FSB, Russia's main intelligence agency, said the American faces up to 20 years in prison if convicted.
NEWS
April 8, 2000 | NORMAN KEMPSTER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The U.S. businessman arrested this week in Moscow on suspicion of espionage was identified Friday as a former naval intelligence officer who retired from the service six years ago as a captain. The FSB, the main successor agency to the Soviet-era KGB, has accused the American, Edmond D. Pope, of purchasing information on defense technology from Russian scientists.
NEWS
April 6, 2000 | RICHARD C. PADDOCK, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Russia's security service said Wednesday that it has arrested a U.S. businessman for suspected espionage after he allegedly bought information on defense technology from Russian scientists. The FSB, the main successor to the Soviet-era KGB, didn't identify the American. It said it had also arrested a Russian expert on military technology who is alleged to be an accomplice.
NEWS
December 1, 1999 | ROBYN DIXON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Russian security officials said Tuesday that they had caught a U.S. diplomat red-handed trying to obtain military secrets, hours after the Pentagon announced charges against an American accused of passing secrets to Russia. The FSB, Russia's internal security service, released a black-and-white photograph of Cheri Leberknight, a second secretary at the U.S. Embassy here, and showed pictures of the high-tech espionage gadgets she allegedly had with her when she was caught Monday night.
NEWS
June 30, 1999 | MAURA REYNOLDS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Russian security forces rescued an American missionary Tuesday more than seven months after he was kidnapped near Russia's lawless and separatist republic of Chechnya. Herbert Gregg, 51, a native of Mesa, Ariz., appeared gaunt but cheerful as he deplaned here in the late evening after leaving the region. "I feel wonderful," he said, managing a smile behind a full beard he grew in captivity. His right hand was wrapped in a bandage.
NEWS
November 13, 1998 | Times Wire Services
An American teacher and missionary has been kidnapped near the southern Russian region of Chechnya by unidentified abductors, officials said Thursday. Herbert Gregg, 51, was abducted Wednesday night in Makhachkala, the capital of Dagestan, which borders breakaway Chechnya. A youth said he saw four people force Gregg into a car with tinted windows and drive away. Gregg and his wife, Linda, have been living in Dagestan for four years. Both have been teaching English to university students.
NEWS
May 4, 1998 | RICHARD C. PADDOCK, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The U.S. Embassy again warned Americans of African and Asian descent to beware of violent neo-Nazi thugs after an African American Marine was beaten by a group of skinheads this weekend at a popular outdoor market. Moscow city police on Sunday arrested one of the assailants, who by chance was interviewed by a Russian television crew moments after the incident and bragged that he often beats black people on the city's streets.
SPORTS
April 7, 1998 | JENNIFER FREY, WASHINGTON POST
Jim Courier has never played in a Davis Cup tie that ended in defeat--let alone disaster--for his home nation, and the thought of suffering such an event had him laughing nervously in the middle of his match here Monday afternoon. The Americans' last hope for triumph in a first-round meeting with Russia, the U.S. veteran was getting sliced up by a baby-faced 18-year-old who had never played Davis Cup before this weekend, let alone won a match.
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