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Americans Ussr

NEWS
June 13, 1992 | From Times Wire Services
The Soviet Union shot down nine U.S. planes in the early 1950s and held 12 American survivors in prisons or psychiatric clinics, Russian President Boris N. Yeltsin said in a letter hand-delivered to U.S. senators Friday. The fate of the Americans is still under investigation, Yeltsin said.
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NEWS
August 15, 1991 | GREG GRANSDEN, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
The three young Soviet women sit quietly onstage, surrounded by blinking game-show lights and colored panels, as the studio audience fires a series of personal questions at them. Meanwhile, three young French businessmen, seated out of view behind a partition, listen intently. "In order to achieve sexual harmony," asks one man in the audience, "should one read books? And if so, when--before or after it's achieved?" Clearly, it's a tricky question, and the women pause to reflect.
NEWS
August 17, 1989 | BETTIJANE LEVINE, Times Staff Writer
It has been 60 years since the teen-aged Abe Stolar reluctantly left Chicago because his Russian-born Jewish parents wanted to go home. Stolar, an American citizen, thought he would return in a year or two. Now at age 77, he has finally made it back. In Los Angeles this week on a 15-city tour to thank Americans for helping get him out of the Soviet Union (he emigrated to Israel in March), Stolar tells a roller-coaster tale of his two worlds: inside and outside of the Soviet Union.
NEWS
February 7, 1990 | ART HARRIS, Harris is a newspaper and magazine writer based in Atlanta, Ga
It began as a tender Moscow love story, shades of "Dr. Zhivago" on the eve of Gorbachev. She was a young working mother who wrote poetry, divorced with a daughter, a budding computer engineer with "my future all mapped out" and no desire to leave Mother Russia. "But I fell in love," says Inna Yur-Evna Carver, 26. "I missed him when he left."
NEWS
April 19, 1987 | Associated Press
Eight American prep school students returned Saturday from Siberia, bringing back a better perspective of Soviet life as they resume studies at their elite Phillips Academy in Andover. They were met at the airport by eight Soviet students who have been at Andover since April 12 and were eager for news the Americans brought back about their classmates at the Novosibirsk Physics Mathematics School. Alyson Horvath, 17, of Akron, Ohio, said she made some "very good friends. I miss them already."
NEWS
January 3, 1992 | ART PINE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Senate investigators are looking into assertions that American prisoners of war were still being held by the Vietnamese in 1978--five years after all U.S. servicemen were supposed to have been returned to American soil. A Senate select committee said Thursday that it plans to interview retired KGB Maj. Gen. Oleg Kalugin on his statements that Soviet intelligence agents interrogated at least three American POWs still in Vietnam that year, despite Hanoi's insistence that no U.S. POWs remained.
NEWS
August 9, 1987 | WILLIAM J. EATON, Times Staff Writer
In a light-hearted mood but with a serious purpose, about 150 Americans took part Saturday in a Moscow marathon and 10-kilometer peace run. They ran, walked and even juggled through the streets of Moscow with thousands of Soviet and European entrants. The American contingent was part of a group known as World Runners whose goal is a world at peace without hunger. They seek individual contributions to promote their objective. U.S.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 18, 1989 | MICHAEL PARKS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Michael Shannon has made it. After studying in Los Angeles, Toronto, Budapest and Moscow, the 19-year-old American has become a soloist at the Bolshoi Ballet. A June graduate of the Bolshoi Ballet Academy, Shannon had hoped to be hired by the parent company. But that was far from certain, for foreign dancers are rare at the Bolshoi, a Russian institution for more than 200 years, and Americans are unprecedented.
NEWS
March 17, 1990 | United Press International
The State Department issued a warning Friday to American travelers to the Soviet Union to be on guard against the downside of President Mikhail S. Gorbachev's program of reforms: street crime, violence from ethnic clashes and deteriorating health care. The unusual travel advisory urged "tourists in frail health not to visit the Soviet Union."
NEWS
December 29, 1991 | JONATHAN PETERSON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Back in the Great Depression, in the days when communism was a gleaming red star that beckoned working-class dreamers from across the sea, 24-year-old Rose Kostyuk packed her bags and moved to Russia. It was an exciting adventure for a spunky young social worker from Philadelphia. Thousands of miles away, the first real socialist state was being hammered together. Idealists everywhere felt a magnetic pull toward this utopian land of Lenin. All the possibilities of a lifetime lay ahead.
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