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November 10, 1985 | Associated Press
Quarterback Paul Foye passed for 200 yards and three touchdowns Saturday to lead Amherst to a 35-20 victory over Williams in the 100th meeting of their rivalry. Before the season's final game for both teams, played before 12,196, the players were read a letter from President Reagan which read, in part: "This rivalry, perhaps the longest-running in small college football, represents the best of this country's tradition of scholar-athletes." Williams (2-5-1) leads the series, 52-44-4.
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March 9, 2014 | By Matt Pearce
Looks like the "Blarney Blowout" lived up to its name. Four police officers were slightly injured and more than 70 people were reported arrested on Saturday after a pre-St. Patrick's Day celebration in Amherst, Mass. The "Blarney Blowout" turned into, well, a blowout. The air was filled with snowballs and flying beer cans as mobs of college-age partiers descended on apartment complexes near the University of Massachusetts' flagship campus in Amherst. In a Saturday statement , the university took pains to denounce the "unsanctioned" Blarney Blowout, which school officials warned could result in suspension or expulsion from the university.
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TRAVEL
July 19, 2009
Regarding "Move Over, Autumn," by Susan Spano [July 12]. On Nov. 14, Williams and Amherst will play the 124th football game in the rivalry known as "The Biggest Little Game in America," which is the fourth-oldest football rivalry in the nation. This game will be shown live somewhere in the L.A. area, where alums from both Williams and Amherst will gather to view the contest. Amherst was created by Williams defectors (that's a whole other story), thus creating the purest rivalry in America.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 26, 2014 | By David Ng
A nearly 40-year-old cold case involving the theft of a valuable work of art from Amherst College has been reopened in the hopes of locating the Dutch Golden Age painting.  The FBI is working with Amherst's Mead Art Museum to locate a work stolen in 1975 from the museum in Massachusetts. The canvas, which dates from the 17th or 18th century, was one of three paintings torn from their frames during a break-in. Mead Art Museum officials announced this month that they are working with the Boston division of the FBI and the FBI's Art Crime Team to try to solve the case.  PHOTOS: Arts and culture in pictures by The Times The missing work is Jan Baptist Lambrechts' "Interior With Figures Smoking and Drinking.
NEWS
May 18, 1987
A minister who handed out condoms in an Amherst, N.Y., church last February during a sermon on sexually transmitted diseases will be allowed to remain a cleric, church officials said. The Ministerial Fellowship Committee of the Unitarian Universalist Church of Amherst ended its investigation of the Rev. Carl Thitchener by voting to let him remain in full fellowship with the denomination, a spokesman said.
SPORTS
February 10, 1991 | TED BROCK
A lot of people say they don't understand boxing--or boxers. Why is that? Vinny Pazienza, former International Boxing Federation lightweight champion, who hinted that he would announce his retirement at a news conference Friday in Cranston, R.I., turned the tables on the media and announced that he will fight on. The Associated Press reported that Pazienza's cryptic bobbing and weaving fooled even his family and close associates.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 24, 2013 | By Claudia Luther
Julie Harris, the delicate yet steely grande dame of the stage whose performances earned her a record five Tony Awards and 10 Tony nominations, died Saturday. She was 87. Harris died of congestive heart failure at her home in West Chatham, Mass., actress Francesca James, a close friend, told the Associated Press. Harris had suffered a stroke in 2001 and another in 2010, James said. In addition to her theatrical awards, Harris was nominated for an Academy Award in 1952 for her indelible performance as Frankie Addams in Carson McCullers' "The Member of the Wedding," a role she had created on Broadway.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 25, 2013 | By Charles McNulty, Theater Critic
Julie Harris wasn't simply one of the great American actors of the 20th century. She represented to those in her profession a reverential ideal. Harris died Saturday at 87 at her home in Chatham, Mass., far away from the bright lights of Broadway. Yet Broadway will never forget her. She was both the embodiment and essence of theatrical excellence -- flesh and spirit, as always with Harris' acting, made one. Her obituaries will tell you that she holds the record as a performer for the most Tony Awards (six, including a special lifetime achievement award)
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 10, 1985 | United Press International
A fire Saturday destroyed the Amherst College gymnasium, causing up to $4 million in damage, officials said.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 25, 2013 | By Charles McNulty, Theater Critic
Julie Harris wasn't simply one of the great American actors of the 20th century. She represented to those in her profession a reverential ideal. Harris died Saturday at 87 at her home in Chatham, Mass., far away from the bright lights of Broadway. Yet Broadway will never forget her. She was both the embodiment and essence of theatrical excellence -- flesh and spirit, as always with Harris' acting, made one. Her obituaries will tell you that she holds the record as a performer for the most Tony Awards (six, including a special lifetime achievement award)
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 24, 2013 | By Claudia Luther
Julie Harris, the delicate yet steely grande dame of the stage whose performances earned her a record five Tony Awards and 10 Tony nominations, died Saturday. She was 87. Harris died of congestive heart failure at her home in West Chatham, Mass., actress Francesca James, a close friend, told the Associated Press. Harris had suffered a stroke in 2001 and another in 2010, James said. In addition to her theatrical awards, Harris was nominated for an Academy Award in 1952 for her indelible performance as Frankie Addams in Carson McCullers' "The Member of the Wedding," a role she had created on Broadway.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 26, 2010 | By Paula L. Woods
Whether they're true or not, myths and legends that surround poets help us to see their work in a comprehensible context. Say the names Keats, Poe or Plath, for instance, and images of consumption, drug addiction and mental illness may come to mind, just as the image of 19th century poet Emily Dickinson as an eccentric recluse has persisted largely based on her poetry and a few scraps of biographical information. Slim pickings for a biographical novel, yet the attraction of Dickinson's poetry for Jerome Charyn inspired him to attempt to put flesh on those mythical bones in his novel "The Secret Life of Emily Dickinson."
TRAVEL
July 19, 2009
Regarding "Move Over, Autumn," by Susan Spano [July 12]. On Nov. 14, Williams and Amherst will play the 124th football game in the rivalry known as "The Biggest Little Game in America," which is the fourth-oldest football rivalry in the nation. This game will be shown live somewhere in the L.A. area, where alums from both Williams and Amherst will gather to view the contest. Amherst was created by Williams defectors (that's a whole other story), thus creating the purest rivalry in America.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 3, 2007 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Calvin H. Plimpton, 88, a former Amherst College president credited with starting the process that led to the admission of women to the prestigious liberal arts school in Massachusetts, died Tuesday at his home in Westwood, Mass., of complications after surgery following a fall, a college spokesman said. Plimpton, a physician, was Amherst's president from 1960 to 1971.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 9, 2000 | MIKE BOEHM, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The Laguna Playhouse will launch its 80th season in September with Julie Harris playing poet Emily Dickinson in "The Belle of Amherst," directed by Charles Nelson Reilly, who also directed her in the original Broadway production in 1976. It also will give all six plays in 2000-01 a longer ride, expanding the run of each show from 31 to 39 performances.
SPORTS
March 10, 1988 | Staff writers Mike Hiserman, Ralph Nichols and Lauren Peterson contributed to this notebook.
Having a national swimming and diving championship in Amherst, N. Y., in March may sound like a bad idea to most people. But the swimmers competing at the NCAA Division II meet at the University of Buffalo this week certainly don't feel that way. After all, the meet is indoors. And in a very fast pool. Buffalo's natatorium is only 1 year old and it is well-equipped. The results prove it.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 3, 2007 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Calvin H. Plimpton, 88, a former Amherst College president credited with starting the process that led to the admission of women to the prestigious liberal arts school in Massachusetts, died Tuesday at his home in Westwood, Mass., of complications after surgery following a fall, a college spokesman said. Plimpton, a physician, was Amherst's president from 1960 to 1971.
SPORTS
March 9, 1997 | MARK HEISLER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
He's too young, he's too emotional, he's never coached in this league, he makes way too much money, he's ruthless, he's insincere and he cheats. What else do they say? Oh yeah, he's a Rick Pitino clone--reprehensible as John Calipari is supposed to be, he isn't even entitled to his own identity.
SPORTS
February 25, 1996 | From Times Wire Services
If any team was going to beat No. 1-ranked Massachusetts this season, it figured to be George Washington. The Colonials, with an 86-76 victory Saturday, made it four consecutive victories over the Minutemen, the last unbeaten team in Division I this season. George Washington, 18-5 overall and 11-2 in the Atlantic 10 Conference, has also won its last four games against Top 10 teams and two in a row on Massachusetts' home court, the Mullins Center, where no other visitor has won more than once.
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