Advertisement
YOU ARE HERE: LAT HomeCollectionsAmnesia
IN THE NEWS

Amnesia

FEATURED ARTICLES
OPINION
October 26, 2009 | GREGORY RODRIGUEZ
Three weeks ago, when the Nobel committee awarded its literature prize to Romanian writer Herta Muller, it lauded her courageous and unflinching fictional portraits of "daily life in a stagnated dictatorship" in communist Romania. What they did not mention, however, was Muller's ongoing nonfictional critique of the leadership of post-communist Romania. Only days after she won the Nobel, Muller, who now lives in Germany, blasted her homeland for not having broken more completely with its communist past.
ARTICLES BY DATE
ENTERTAINMENT
January 24, 2014 | By Meehan Crist
One day, David Stuart MacLean forgot who he was. "It was darkness darkness darkness, then snap. Me. Now awake. " He was a blank slate, standing in a bustling train station in India. Things went downhill from there. From these dark days, MacLean has created a deeply moving account of amnesia that explores the quandary of the self. The book's short, episodic sections are particularly well suited to evoking the hellish psychosis MacLean endures after "waking up. " These disorienting snippets of experience offer little reflection, context or connective tissue.
Advertisement
NEWS
May 12, 2011 | By Marissa Cevallos, HealthKey / For the Booster Shots blog
First memories—a trip to the hospital, an ice cream cone at the beach—change as children get older, a new study finds, and don’t crystallize until about age 10.  But the study raises new questions about why the first few years of life, aside from traumatic events, are so forgettable. BrainConnection from PositScience offers this perspective on what’s known as infantile amnesia: “Studies suggest that we're not simply forgetting what happened during our earliest years; far fewer autobiographical memories exist from early childhood than simple forgetting predicts.
OPINION
September 19, 2013 | By Arthur J. Magida
Walt Whitman might have gotten a good laugh out of this. I know I did. I mention Whitman because of a recent incident at the rest stop on the New Jersey Turnpike named after him, a place offering food that didn't exist in Whitman's time and a stream of vehicles that would have terrified the most American of our poets, a versifier who dreamed of our nation's lofty promises and luscious possibilities. One thing Whitman didn't dream about was how, more than a century after his death, a pit stop along a massive highway would affirm my pet peeve about the cultural and historical amnesia of Americans.
NEWS
February 6, 2000 | From Times Wire Reports
Mary Joyce Howard, lost for two years as an amnesia victim living in an Oklahoma nursing home as Jane Doe, was reunited with her family in High Point, N.C. Her parents, brother and sister-in-law were waiting as a doctor and two paramedics, all volunteers, arrived with her following an 18-hour drive from Oklahoma City. Howard was injured in a hit-and-run highway accident in February 1998 and underwent major brain surgery.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 24, 2014 | By Meehan Crist
One day, David Stuart MacLean forgot who he was. "It was darkness darkness darkness, then snap. Me. Now awake. " He was a blank slate, standing in a bustling train station in India. Things went downhill from there. From these dark days, MacLean has created a deeply moving account of amnesia that explores the quandary of the self. The book's short, episodic sections are particularly well suited to evoking the hellish psychosis MacLean endures after "waking up. " These disorienting snippets of experience offer little reflection, context or connective tissue.
NEWS
October 8, 1988 | ERIC MALNIC, Times Staff Writer
Free-lance photographer Michael F. Ritter, who disappeared three weeks ago from his ransacked, bloodstained office in Reno--triggering speculation that he was a victim of foul play--walked into his parish church in Reno and said he was suffering from amnesia, police reported Friday. "I don't know who I am. I want you to help find my family," Ritter told an employee at the Reno Christian Fellowship Church on Thursday afternoon, according to sources close to the investigation.
NEWS
February 11, 1985 | Associated Press
Hospital officials said that a series of strokes last December has left William J. Schroeder with amnesia, it was reported Sunday. "His problem is his short-term memory," Linda Broadus, a spokeswoman for Humana Inc., operator of Humana Hospital Audubon, said in a report published by the New York Times. Broadus said that Schroeder has trouble remembering such things as who visited him earlier in the day, who joined him for breakfast or what he had to eat. Dr.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 18, 1992
A man wandered into the Pomona police station this week and said he was "trying to find out who he is," police said. Officers took the man to the Tri-City Mental Health Center, where he was interviewed Monday by a psychologist, said Pomona Police Lt. Joe Romero, and later to the Pomona Valley Hospital Medical Center for examination by a physician.
BUSINESS
January 5, 2010 | Dan Neil
A tough, tasty steak of a book, Justin Fox's "The Myth of the Rational Market" arrived last fall just in time to explain how and why the smartest economists and best-managed institutions on Wall Street nearly detonated a bomb in the world's underpants. At the risk of oversimplifying: The abstract thing we call markets (trading in stocks, bonds, options, securities, etc.) is indeed rational -- predictable, mathematical, knowable. It's the human actors who are irrational, if not downright insane.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 16, 2013 | By Los Angeles Times Staff
A relative of a man who was found unconscious in a Palm Springs motel room four months ago and woke up speaking only Swedish has finally been located, the Desert Sun newspaper reported Tuesday. A sister of 61-year-old Michael Boatwright -- who has spent more than 19 weeks at Desert Regional Medical Center, insisting his name is Johan Ek and has no memory of his life as Boatwright -- was contacted by the newspaper. Michelle Brewer told the Desert Sun over the phone Monday from her home in Louisiana: "I haven't talked to him in years.
SCIENCE
March 7, 2013 | By Amy Hubbard
Curiosity, recently in hunker-down mode amid a solar storm lashing Mars, is suffering from amnesia. But it's mild. The rover is getting back in the swing of its mission after a significant computer glitch, which was followed by a solar flare that sent radiation barreling toward the Red Planet. “We kept the rover asleep for the solar event,” scientist Ashwin Vasavada told the Los Angeles Times on Thursday, “but now we are resuming operations, which center around diagnosing the original glitch and preparing for science operations on the B-side computer.” The B-side computer is the spare.
NEWS
June 24, 2012 | By Morgan Little
Los Angeles Mayor Antonio Villaraigosa accused Mitt Romney of having “amnesia” on immigration reform, taking the Republican presidential candidate to task for saying that President Obama's recent changes to federal immigration policies had done “nothing.” Contending that congressional deadlock over the contentious issue left Obama with no choice, Villaraigosa praised the president's announcement that deportation of young undocumented immigrants...
ENTERTAINMENT
January 22, 2012 | By David L. Ulin, Los Angeles Times Book Critic
The Fat Years A Novel Chan Koonchung, translated from the Chinese by Michael S. Duke Nan A. Talese/Doubleday: 310 pp., $26.95 I've long been partial to E.M. Forster's formulation that the role of fiction - or one of them, anyway - is to suggest a "buzz of implication," a flavor of its time and place more nuanced than history allows. That's because fiction is an art of narrative, of emotion, defined by the singular movements of individuals as they navigate specific corners of the world.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 6, 2011 | By Jonathan Shapiro, Special to the Los Angeles Times
S.J. Watson's debut novel, "Before I Go to Sleep," is a brilliant, nasty noir. It drags you down into deep, dark and disturbing waters. It entertains while touching on complex questions of the meaning of identity and memory. A young woman wakes up in bed next to a man. She doesn't know the bed. She doesn't know the man. The woman is young and single. The man is much older. And he's wearing a wedding ring. Embarrassing, at least, and socially awkward to be sure, this could be the setup of a Candace Bushnell romp, or the sequel script to "Bridesmaids.
NEWS
May 12, 2011 | By Marissa Cevallos, HealthKey / For the Booster Shots blog
First memories—a trip to the hospital, an ice cream cone at the beach—change as children get older, a new study finds, and don’t crystallize until about age 10.  But the study raises new questions about why the first few years of life, aside from traumatic events, are so forgettable. BrainConnection from PositScience offers this perspective on what’s known as infantile amnesia: “Studies suggest that we're not simply forgetting what happened during our earliest years; far fewer autobiographical memories exist from early childhood than simple forgetting predicts.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 8, 1994 | ANNA CEKOLA and FRANK MESSINA, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
Robert Joseph Moody walked up to a reception desk at the Orange County Sheriff's Department claiming to suffer from amnesia. If Moody didn't know who he was, he quickly found out. He's a TV celebrity of sorts, a murder suspect featured in December on "America's Most Wanted." Moody appeared Wednesday morning at a personnel office on the first floor of the Sheriff's headquarters in Santa Ana, saying he was "confused as to his identity," a sheriff's spokesman said.
NEWS
September 23, 1989 | From United Press International
The world's most-prescribed sleeping pill can cause temporary memory loss but, because there is no evidence that it endangers public health, it should not be banned, a federal advisory panel said Friday. The Food and Drug Administration's advisory committee unanimously recommended that the agency change the label on Upjohn Co.'s sleeping pill--called Halcion--to warn doctors that the drug may be more likely to cause amnesia than similar medications.
HEALTH
January 24, 2011 | By Joe Graedon and Theresa Graedon, Special to the Los Angeles Times
My doctor prescribed Vytorin for high cholesterol. While my cholesterol went from over 350 to 190 in five weeks, I ended up having an eight-hour episode of transient global amnesia (TGA). I knew who I was, and I recognized my family and friends, but I didn't know the year. I didn't recognize streets I have driven for many years. I asked my husband the same five questions in the hospital over and over until late in the evening, when my memory returned. I immediately went off Vytorin.
NEWS
October 29, 2010 | By Michael Muskal, Los Angeles Times
Democrats, including President Obama, repeatedly say that if voters really knew all of the things Congress has done, then the people would be rushing to vote for Democrats. Now, a new poll has confirmed the Democrats' worst fears about social amnesia. According to a Gallup poll released Friday, 37% of Americans said Congress had accomplished less this year than in the last few years while just 23% said it had accomplished more. Even though Congress has passed significant legislation on healthcare, financial reform and economic stimulus, more than a third of the people say lawmakers have done little and slightly more than a third said this Congress has done just about the same as past congresses.
Los Angeles Times Articles
|