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Amory Lovins

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NEWS
May 27, 1990 | JULIA RUBIN, ASSOCIATED PRESS
A decade ago, "soft-energy" expert Amory Lovins felt like a gadfly in energy-industry circles. Now, he's more of a guru, visited at his mountain home here by a steady stream of utility executives seeking advice on how to make their customers' kilowatts go further. His clients include large and small utilities, government agencies and universities around the world.
ARTICLES BY DATE
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 13, 1994
Now comes Amory Lovins, an environmentalist with no professional experience in auto design, who announces that the 300-miles-per-gallon auto lies at hand. His friend Donella Meadows, who has even less pertinent experience, eagerly praises him (Column Left, Oct. 4). I have a little challenge for Lovins: Design and build your vehicle, and see if anyone will buy it. Quite a few inventors already have built cars such as Lovins envisions. In the local area, Doug Malewicki of Irvine got 150 m.p.g.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 13, 1994
Now comes Amory Lovins, an environmentalist with no professional experience in auto design, who announces that the 300-miles-per-gallon auto lies at hand. His friend Donella Meadows, who has even less pertinent experience, eagerly praises him (Column Left, Oct. 4). I have a little challenge for Lovins: Design and build your vehicle, and see if anyone will buy it. Quite a few inventors already have built cars such as Lovins envisions. In the local area, Doug Malewicki of Irvine got 150 m.p.g.
NEWS
March 27, 1991 | MICHAEL PARRISH, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The other side of the earth from a war-weary Persian Gulf, an unassuming country home built into a hillside northwest of Aspen has become a showcase of energy-saving technology for the environmentalists, utility executives and regulators who for nearly a decade have trooped through. Today, the home and office of Amory Lovins--arguably the best-known international advocate of energy conservation--is no longer as eccentric as it once seemed.
NEWS
March 27, 1991 | MICHAEL PARRISH, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The other side of the earth from a war-weary Persian Gulf, an unassuming country home built into a hillside northwest of Aspen has become a showcase of energy-saving technology for the environmentalists, utility executives and regulators who for nearly a decade have trooped through. Today, the home and office of Amory Lovins--arguably the best-known international advocate of energy conservation--is no longer as eccentric as it once seemed.
NEWS
January 27, 1992 | By Times staff writers
THINKING AHEAD: Although he may be getting ahead of himself, Brown recently gave a preview of those he would consider for service in his presidential Administration. During an appearance on the C-SPAN cable television network, Brown cited consumer advocate Ralph Nader, environmentalist David Broward, solar energy advocate Amory Lovins and civil rights activist Jesse Jackson as possible Cabinet picks. He also named Nader and Jackson as potential running mates.
BOOKS
April 20, 1986 | BILL STALL
ENERGY UNBOUND: A FABLE FOR AMERICA'S FUTURE by Hunter Lovins, Amory Lovins and Seth Zuckerman (Sierra Club: $17.95). Eunice Bunnyhut, a Dubuque homemaker for 24 years, answers a blind want ad and winds up as U.S. secretary of Energy. The President, it seems, was frustrated with energy policies that didn't work and wanted a layperson to bring some common sense to the snarl of conflicting policies and priorities.
BUSINESS
May 8, 1995 | Times Staff Reports
Big Gas Show: The third annual North American Gas Efficiency Exposition and Conference, more widely billed as Gas Expo 95, will showcase the most advanced natural gas technology currently available, Wednesday and Thursday at Southern California Gas Co.'s new technology center in Downey. More than 100 exhibits and 40 technical seminars will showcase mostly industrial and commercial equipment, along with such consumer goods as natural gas vehicles and gas barbecue designs.
BUSINESS
March 4, 1993 | MICHAEL PARRISH, TIMES STAFF WRITER
At an environmental conference in Los Angeles four years ago, Marc Merson got a bright idea. During a long day of bad news about vanishing rain forests and other planetary ills, he heard a word of hope: Amory Lovins, an energy conservation expert, was explaining the virtues of compact fluorescent light bulbs, an energy-saving device that lets ordinary people help solve global problems.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 16, 1989
Gale frames the energy question in relatively narrow terms. He rightly emphasizes our lack of serious commitment to effective energy policies but implies there are few options to expanded energy supplies as future demand increases. We are told all sources are tainted by environmental hazards but nuclear power appears the least troublesome--if not for emotional reactionaries and murky politics which cloud rational thought. If we really want to be sensible about our options, why not take a cue from utilities who found conservation more profitable than new sources?
NEWS
May 27, 1990 | JULIA RUBIN, ASSOCIATED PRESS
A decade ago, "soft-energy" expert Amory Lovins felt like a gadfly in energy-industry circles. Now, he's more of a guru, visited at his mountain home here by a steady stream of utility executives seeking advice on how to make their customers' kilowatts go further. His clients include large and small utilities, government agencies and universities around the world.
OPINION
April 16, 1989
Achieving dramatic energy savings is something of a cinch when the builder starts from scratch and can custom-design an energy-efficient home or building. The Times has written in the past about the amazing energy savings of Amory Lovins' home and work place in the Colorado Rockies. That may be fine for a visionary tinkerer like Lovins who could afford to build every sort of energy-saving wrinkle into a showcase home in the lofty solar-bright heights of the mountains. But what about the average office building?
NEWS
February 22, 1989 | SHIRLEY MARLOW
When former President Ronald Reagan left office last month, he ended his weekly radio addresses to the nation. Since then, several broadcasters have invited Reagan to return to the airwaves. One of the most recent offers came from a contemporary Christian music radio station in Dallas, which proposed a job as host of a weekly talk program. In a letter dated Feb.
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