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Amusement Parks California

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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 24, 1999
A Northern California legislator came here Tuesday to announce yet another legislative attempt to force state government oversight of California's 71 amusement parks. Assemblyman Tom Torlakson (D-Antioch) said he will introduce legislation this week to address growing concerns about accountability at the parks, compounded by the death of a Disneyland patron in December.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 5, 2001 | KIMI YOSHINO and JESSICA GARRISON, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
The days of self-policed California theme parks are over. Last week, the state ordered Disneyland--run by the biggest and most powerful theme park conglomerate in the world--to make major design and safety changes before reopening the Roger Rabbit Car Toon Spin, a ride that left a 4-year-old boy severely brain damaged in a Sept. 22 accident.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 24, 1999 | SEEMA MEHTA, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The assemblyman whose bid to regulate the state's amusement parks failed last year said Tuesday that a bill he plans to introduce this week would require an independent agency to inspect permanent rides at all parks every year. Assemblyman Tom Torlakson (D-Antioch) said that allowing parks to inspect themselves and file affidavits stating that their rides are safe would not be acceptable under his bill.
BUSINESS
September 24, 2000 | JERRY HIRSCH, TIMES STAFF WRITER
As construction workers rush to finish the newest family escape in Anaheim, the company that originated the Magic Kingdom doesn't plan to unveil the most extravagant theme park in the world, or even in the neighborhood. This new park isn't a showcase for cutting-edge amusement-ride technology or white-knuckle thrills--a remarkable admission for the heirs to legendary creative genius Walt Disney and the people responsible for pushing the industry to new heights.
NEWS
November 19, 1993 | TONY PERRY and DON WOUTAT, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
Ending a nine-month competition between the governors of California and Virginia, the Danish toy maker Lego has decided to build a 40-acre, $100-million theme park in suburban Carlsbad rather than Prince William County, Va. At the request of Lego, which has guarded the selection process like a military secret, California state and local officials were asked to refrain from publicly rejoicing over the selection until a formal announcement is made at a news conference this morning.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 2, 1999 | NANCY HILL-HOLTZMAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In a surprise move, a state senator set aside his tough theme-park regulation bill Monday and joined forces with the author of a weaker measure that could be voted on today in the state Assembly. Sen. Don Perata (D-Alameda) said he yielded to Assemblyman Tom Torlakson's approach to regulating the industry because the Antioch Democrat had worked on the issue longer and in more depth.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 15, 1999 | NANCY HILL-HOLTZMAN and E. SCOTT RECKARD, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A bill that calls for semi-annual state inspections of amusement park rides won approval from a state Senate committee Wednesday, as Disneyland agreed to pay a Cal/OSHA fine prompted by a fatal accident there in December. The regulatory bill, by state Sen. Don Perata (D-Alameda), passed the Senate Industrial Relations Committee 4 to 0. It takes a more hard-line stance than a second bill, by Assemblyman Tom Torlakson (D-Antioch), which is expected to have its first committee hearing next week.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 25, 1999 | NANCY HILL-HOLTZMAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Freshman Assemblyman Lou Correa, in sharp contrast to a fellow Democrat, said Wednesday that he will propose a state law this week to allow amusement parks to vouch for themselves that their rides are safe. The bill would be the second offered to regulate the amusement park industry. On Tuesday, Assemblyman Tom Torlakson (D-Antioch) said he would submit a bill this week, one that would require independent inspections of all parks annually.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 28, 1999 | NANCY HILL-HOLTZMAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A state Senate measure to inspect permanent theme parks twice a year cleared a key committee Thursday and will head to the full Senate for a vote next week. The bill, sponsored by Sen. Don Perata (D-Alameda), calls for more frequent visits by state inspectors than a measure in the Assembly, which also will vote next week on its version. Both Perata's bill and the measure sponsored by Assemblyman Tom Torlakson (D-Antioch) would require theme parks to report serious accidents to the state.
NEWS
May 18, 1997 | MARK ARAX, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Before developer Norman Jarrett turns off the lights and fires up the projector, he wants to make one thing clear about the creation he calls Gold Rush City.
BUSINESS
March 29, 2000 | E. SCOTT RECKARD, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Walt Disney Co., Universal Studios Inc. and other amusement park operators failed to show up Tuesday at a public forum called by state officials to go over proposed rules for a new law regulating the industry. Their absence prompted critics to contend that the parks were boycotting the meeting, possibly because news reporters were present to hear how wide the gulf is between the proposed rules and what the parks want.
NEWS
March 29, 2000 | E. SCOTT RECKARD, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Walt Disney Co., Universal Studios Inc. and other amusement park operators failed to show up Tuesday at a public forum called by state officials to go over proposed rules for a new law regulating the industry. Their absence prompted critics to contend that the parks were boycotting the meeting, possibly because news reporters were present to hear how wide the gulf is between the proposed rules and what the parks want.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 2, 1999 | NANCY HILL-HOLTZMAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In a surprise move, a state senator set aside his tough theme-park regulation bill Monday and joined forces with the author of a weaker measure that could be voted on today in the state Assembly. Sen. Don Perata (D-Alameda) said he yielded to Assemblyman Tom Torlakson's approach to regulating the industry because the Antioch Democrat had worked on the issue longer and in more depth.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 28, 1999 | NANCY HILL-HOLTZMAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A state Senate measure to inspect permanent theme parks twice a year cleared a key committee Thursday and will head to the full Senate for a vote next week. The bill, sponsored by Sen. Don Perata (D-Alameda), calls for more frequent visits by state inspectors than a measure in the Assembly, which also will vote next week on its version. Both Perata's bill and the measure sponsored by Assemblyman Tom Torlakson (D-Antioch) would require theme parks to report serious accidents to the state.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 15, 1999 | NANCY HILL-HOLTZMAN and E. SCOTT RECKARD, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A bill that calls for semi-annual state inspections of amusement park rides won approval from a state Senate committee Wednesday, as Disneyland agreed to pay a Cal/OSHA fine prompted by a fatal accident there in December. The regulatory bill, by state Sen. Don Perata (D-Alameda), passed the Senate Industrial Relations Committee 4 to 0. It takes a more hard-line stance than a second bill, by Assemblyman Tom Torlakson (D-Antioch), which is expected to have its first committee hearing next week.
NEWS
March 28, 1999 | DEBORAH SCHOCH and TRACY WEBER and E. SCOTT RECKARD, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
Recent deaths on amusement-park rides in California and Texas are prompting calls for tougher and more uniform regulation of the multibillion-dollar industry. Legislators in both states are pushing for more rigorous state oversight of rides that shoot park-goers down water-filled flumes, whirl them in the air or send them jouncing through simulations of off-road adventures. And a current and former U.S.
NEWS
March 28, 1999 | DEBORAH SCHOCH and TRACY WEBER and E. SCOTT RECKARD, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
Recent deaths on amusement-park rides in California and Texas are prompting calls for tougher and more uniform regulation of the multibillion-dollar industry. Legislators in both states are pushing for more rigorous state oversight of rides that shoot park-goers down water-filled flumes, whirl them in the air or send them jouncing through simulations of off-road adventures. And a current and former U.S.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 5, 2001 | KIMI YOSHINO and JESSICA GARRISON, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
The days of self-policed California theme parks are over. Last week, the state ordered Disneyland--run by the biggest and most powerful theme park conglomerate in the world--to make major design and safety changes before reopening the Roger Rabbit Car Toon Spin, a ride that left a 4-year-old boy severely brain damaged in a Sept. 22 accident.
MAGAZINE
March 7, 1999 | TONY PERRY, Tony Perry is a Times staff writer. His last article for the magazine was on Deepak Chopra
The red team was having a panic attack. Gov. Pete Wilson had long been obsessed with making sure that Legoland, a proposed $130-million venture, be built on a mesa in the San Diego suburb of Carlsbad. And for good reason. Not only would the theme park boost the regional economy, it would send a signal that the recession-beset Golden State, knocked to its knees by military-base closures and the dismantling of the aerospace industry, was back in business.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 25, 1999 | NANCY HILL-HOLTZMAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Freshman Assemblyman Lou Correa, in sharp contrast to a fellow Democrat, said Wednesday that he will propose a state law this week to allow amusement parks to vouch for themselves that their rides are safe. The bill would be the second offered to regulate the amusement park industry. On Tuesday, Assemblyman Tom Torlakson (D-Antioch) said he would submit a bill this week, one that would require independent inspections of all parks annually.
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