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Amusement Parks Finances

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NEWS
July 13, 1991 | JEFFREY A. PERLMAN and ROBERT W. STEWART, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
In need of cash to help finance part of their massive Anaheim expansion plans, Disneyland officials are asking the nation's taxpayers to pay nearly $400 million to help them out. The Disney Development Co.
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BUSINESS
May 6, 2000 | E. SCOTT RECKARD, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Cedar Fair LP, the Ohio partnership that owns Knott's Berry Farm, reported larger first-quarter losses Friday, saying Knott's attracted fewer patrons than a year earlier, when its GhostRider wooden roller coaster was brand new. Cedar Fair lost $26.6 million, or 51 cents per limited partner unit, during the latest quarter, compared with a loss of $21.8 million, or 41 cents per unit, a year earlier. Revenue fell 11.6% to $20.5 million.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 27, 1994 | CHRIS WOODYARD and MATT LAIT, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
Top Walt Disney Co. officials on Sunday praised the cooperation they have received from the city, state and federal governments in helping to finance a planned $3-billion theme park resort, but said the project is still too financially risky to build. "They have done the best they can do," said Roy Disney, vice chairman of the board of directors in lauding the government help. "We're still looking for a way of getting it done. It's a very big project."
BUSINESS
August 5, 1999 | E. SCOTT RECKARD, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In a sign that the nation's theme parks are experiencing a tepid year, the partnership that owns Knott's Berry Farm and four other parks said Wednesday that attendance fell 3% during the April-June quarter. Profits declined only slightly, however, because of higher spending by customers. Cedar Fair LP of Sandusky, Ohio, did not break out results for Knott's, but officials said attendance and customer spending at the Buena Park tourist attraction were higher.
NEWS
January 1, 1994 | JAMES F. PELTZ, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The beleaguered Euro Disney theme park outside Paris is doing so poorly it might have to close unless it gets help soon from its lenders, the chairman of Walt Disney Co. said in an interview published Friday. Michael D. Eisner, in his strongest remarks yet about the troubled 20-month-old park, was quoted in the French weekly magazine Le Point as saying "everything is possible" concerning Euro Disney's future, "including closure," if efforts to improve the park's financial health fail.
BUSINESS
May 6, 2000 | E. SCOTT RECKARD, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Cedar Fair LP, the Ohio partnership that owns Knott's Berry Farm, reported larger first-quarter losses Friday, saying Knott's attracted fewer patrons than a year earlier, when its GhostRider wooden roller coaster was brand new. Cedar Fair lost $26.6 million, or 51 cents per limited partner unit, during the latest quarter, compared with a loss of $21.8 million, or 41 cents per unit, a year earlier. Revenue fell 11.6% to $20.5 million.
BUSINESS
June 2, 1994 | JESUS SANCHEZ, TIMES STAFF WRITER
"Someday, my prince will come . . . " --Snow White, 1937 Someday was Wednesday for Walt Disney Co. and its partners in Euro Disney, as a Saudi Arabian prince pledged to invest up to $500 million in a plan designed to rescue the deeply troubled theme park.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 26, 1993 | RICK HOLGUIN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Preservationist Diane Rush cringes when she looks at the gift and souvenir shops that were recently installed on the historic deck of the Queen Mary, altering the ship's original design. Then she turns her attention to what has not been restored, such as the areas where crew members worked and lived, and the dining area where economy-class passengers ate. The ship's operator "is not putting anything into historic preservation," Rush said.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 10, 1997 | DOUGLAS P. SHUIT, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Saying that the Queen Mary is too important an icon to let go, Long Beach City Manager James C. Hankla on Friday strongly recommended that the City Council refuse to sell the ship or send it temporarily to Tokyo.
BUSINESS
July 11, 1994 | CHRIS WOODYARD and JUBE SHIVER Jr., TIMES STAFF WRITERS
While the audience inside Washington's Uptown Theater was voicing its resounding approval of Walt Disney Co.'s new animated feature, "The Lion King," company Chairman Michael Eisner was getting a very different reception outside: 100 sign-toting demonstrators were chanting "Disney go home!" The purpose of the recent protest was to urge Eisner to shelve plans for the controversial Disney's America theme park near their homes in suburban Virginia.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 27, 1994 | CHRIS WOODYARD and MATT LAIT, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
Top Walt Disney Co. officials on Sunday praised the cooperation they have received from the city, state and federal governments in helping to finance a planned $3-billion theme park resort, but said the project is still too financially risky to build. "They have done the best they can do," said Roy Disney, vice chairman of the board of directors in lauding the government help. "We're still looking for a way of getting it done. It's a very big project."
BUSINESS
June 23, 1994
The Balboa Fun Zone, which has been for sale since being placed in receivership in 1992, has been sold to the park's operators--two men who first worked for the small amusement park before they were teen-agers. "We started working here in 1951 as 12-year-olds, picking up paper and blowing up balloons," said Joe Tunstall, who has operated the park for several years with Bob Speth. "Now, we own it."
BUSINESS
June 9, 1994 | From Associated Press
Attendance is still falling at Euro Disneyland, and French stock market regulators issued a rare warning to shareholders Wednesday as park officials forecast more losses. At an extraordinary meeting where they approved a financial rescue plan, shareholders heard a litany of bad news but were told to expect improvement. The park, which opened in April, 1992, welcomed 10.5 million visitors in its first year, 500,000 under expectations. In the second year, the figure fell to 9.
BUSINESS
June 2, 1994 | JESUS SANCHEZ, TIMES STAFF WRITER
"Someday, my prince will come . . . " --Snow White, 1937 Someday was Wednesday for Walt Disney Co. and its partners in Euro Disney, as a Saudi Arabian prince pledged to invest up to $500 million in a plan designed to rescue the deeply troubled theme park.
BUSINESS
June 23, 1994
The Balboa Fun Zone, which has been for sale since being placed in receivership in 1992, has been sold to the park's operators--two men who first worked for the small amusement park before they were teen-agers. "We started working here in 1951 as 12-year-olds, picking up paper and blowing up balloons," said Joe Tunstall, who has operated the park for several years with Bob Speth. "Now, we own it."
BUSINESS
May 20, 1994 | From Associated Press
The 61 creditor banks of the ailing Euro Disney theme park have agreed to a financial restructuring plan aimed at reviving the debt-ridden resort, two of the banks said Thursday. Banque Nationale de Paris and Banque Indosuez said a sufficient number of banks have agreed to cover 51% of a capital boost for Euro Disney. The rescue package features a $1.05-billion capital increase through an offering of stock planned for this summer. Shareholders have yet to consider the overall plan.
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