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Amy Pascal

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ENTERTAINMENT
January 15, 2014 | By Daniel Miller
For much of last year, Amy Pascal was under fire. The co-chair of Sony Pictures Entertainment presided over two of last year's big-budget bombs, "After Earth" and "White House Down. " Her studio reported losses of $181 million for the summer months. Activist investor Daniel Loeb hammered Pascal's division, demanding an end to the "free passes" Sony studio executives got when their films disappointed and calling on parent company Sony Corp. to spin off part of its entertainment business.
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ENTERTAINMENT
January 16, 2014 | By Joe Flint
After the coffee. Before scrutinizing the Oscar nominations. The Skinny: I got my copy of the new Roger Ailes biography "The Loudest Voice in the Room" and did what any media reporter does when a new book comes out on someone they have covered. I plowed through the footnotes until I found my name. Now I can take my time reading it and deciding whether it is fair and balanced. Today's headlines include a look at the Oscar nominations and a profile of Amy Pascal . Daily Dose: Media watchdog Public Knowledge just made a hire with some bite.
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ENTERTAINMENT
July 1, 2009 | PATRICK GOLDSTEIN
It's never an easy decision when a studio head has to pull the plug on a big movie, as Amy Pascal did last week when she shut down "Moneyball," a $58-million Steven Soderbergh film that was set to star Brad Pitt as Billy Beane, the maverick general manager of the Oakland A's who almost single-handedly reinvented the way baseball scouts and develops young talent. The movie, based on the bestselling book by Michael Lewis, wasn't just in preproduction.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 15, 2014 | By Daniel Miller
For much of last year, Amy Pascal was under fire. The co-chair of Sony Pictures Entertainment presided over two of last year's big-budget bombs, "After Earth" and "White House Down. " Her studio reported losses of $181 million for the summer months. Activist investor Daniel Loeb hammered Pascal's division, demanding an end to the "free passes" Sony studio executives got when their films disappointed and calling on parent company Sony Corp. to spin off part of its entertainment business.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 7, 2008
Drawing crowds: The Tribeca Film Festival announced a total attendance of just less than 400,000 at this year's festival. Event organizers estimated a ticketed attendance of more than 155,000 to 700 screenings and 14 panel discussions throughout the festival, which ran April 23 through May 4. -- Good deeds: The Simon Wiesenthal Center is honoring Amy Pascal, co-chair of Sony Pictures Entertainment and chairwoman of Sony Pictures Entertainment Motion...
ENTERTAINMENT
November 19, 2005
RE "Hurry. Somebody Call Spider-Man," by John Horn, Nov. 14: Every movie genre has a simple formula. The good movies exploit that formula over and over, and the great ones add subtle twists. For the most part, the movies that did well for Sony had solid stories. It's almost inconceivable to me, as a produced screenwriter, that Sony executive Amy Pascal could possibly look at "Deuce Bigelow" or "Stealth" and declare, "It's always in the end about good stories and telling them well." I laughed harder at that quote than at anything I've seen in a Sony release all year.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 1, 1995 | Elaine Dutka
Some of them you know. Some you don't. But the following artists, entertainers and executives have one thing in common: We're counting on each to mae a significant impact or difference in their respective fields this year. Sure, there will be thers who make a splash, but after we talked with dozens of people who work in entertainment and the arts, these were the names mentioned most often. You might say that Jim Carrey was a face to watch in '94, and you would be right.
BUSINESS
August 25, 1994 | ALAN CITRON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In a long-rumored move, Turner Pictures Worldwide named Amy Pascal president of production Wednesday. Pascal, a former executive vice president of production at Columbia Pictures, is to produce up to eight theatrical features a year under the Turner Pictures banner by 1998. Media mogul Ted Turner is ramping up production as part of a broad Hollywood expansion.
BUSINESS
December 16, 1999 | CLAUDIA ELLER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Amy Pascal has been promoted to chairwoman of Columbia Pictures after having served as president of the Sony-owned studio for the last three years. Pascal becomes the third woman in Hollywood to hold that title in the movie industry, along with Paramount Pictures chief Sherry Lansing and Universal Pictures' Stacey Snider. Unlike Lansing and Snider, however, Pascal, 41, does not oversee marketing and distribution.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 15, 2013 | By Nicole Sperling
The Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences elected 10 first-time governors including Sony Pictures Co-chairman Amy Pascal to its board of directors for the upcoming year. The board's ranks have been expanded from 43 to 48. In addition to Pascal, costume designers Judianna Makovsky and Deborah Nadoolman, designers Rick Carter and Jan Pascale, documentarian Alex Gibney, film editor Lynzee Klingman, and Kathryn Blondell and Bill Corso from the makeup artists and hairstylists branch, will join the board of governors.
BUSINESS
October 30, 2010 | By Claudia Eller and Ben Fritz, Los Angeles Times
In a move that surprised Hollywood, Columbia Pictures' long-running tag team of production heads Doug Belgrad and Matt Tolmach is breaking up. Tolmach, who has served as co-president of Sony Pictures' Columbia label for the last eight years, is moving on to become a producer at the studio while Belgrad stays as sole president. Since they were named to their posts in 2002, the pair have been heavily promoted to the creative community and media as equals and Sony Pictures co-Chairman Amy Pascal's top production lieutenants.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 1, 2009 | PATRICK GOLDSTEIN
It's never an easy decision when a studio head has to pull the plug on a big movie, as Amy Pascal did last week when she shut down "Moneyball," a $58-million Steven Soderbergh film that was set to star Brad Pitt as Billy Beane, the maverick general manager of the Oakland A's who almost single-handedly reinvented the way baseball scouts and develops young talent. The movie, based on the bestselling book by Michael Lewis, wasn't just in preproduction.
BUSINESS
June 23, 2009 | Claudia Eller and John Horn
At a time when expensive adult dramas keep striking out at the box office, it appears not even Brad Pitt and director Steven Soderbergh can entice a Hollywood studio to spend about $57 million on a baseball movie. Sony Pictures has stopped production on "Moneyball," an adaptation of Michael Lewis' 2003 bestseller of the same name about the revival of the Oakland A's, which was to be directed by Soderbergh and star Pitt.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 7, 2008
Drawing crowds: The Tribeca Film Festival announced a total attendance of just less than 400,000 at this year's festival. Event organizers estimated a ticketed attendance of more than 155,000 to 700 screenings and 14 panel discussions throughout the festival, which ran April 23 through May 4. -- Good deeds: The Simon Wiesenthal Center is honoring Amy Pascal, co-chair of Sony Pictures Entertainment and chairwoman of Sony Pictures Entertainment Motion...
BUSINESS
September 7, 2006 | Claudia Eller, Times Staff Writer
Sony Pictures Entertainment movie chief Amy Pascal is being rewarded for her contributions with a bigger title and a longer contract. Pascal on Wednesday was named co-chair, signing a deal aimed at keeping her on the studio's Culver City lot until 2011. The moves follow a turnaround this year for Sony that included such hits as "The Da Vinci Code," starring Tom Hanks, the Will Ferrell comedy "Talladega Nights: The Ballad of Ricky Bobby" and the Adam Sandler film "Click."
BUSINESS
December 2, 1996 | From Reuters
Sony Pictures Entertainment on Sunday took another step toward overhauling its management by naming former Turner Pictures executive Amy Pascal to head its troubled Columbia Pictures division. The move, the latest in series of appointments by Sony, brings Pascal back to Columbia, where she worked for seven years before joining Turner Pictures in 1994.
BUSINESS
June 23, 2009 | Claudia Eller and John Horn
At a time when expensive adult dramas keep striking out at the box office, it appears not even Brad Pitt and director Steven Soderbergh can entice a Hollywood studio to spend about $57 million on a baseball movie. Sony Pictures has stopped production on "Moneyball," an adaptation of Michael Lewis' 2003 bestseller of the same name about the revival of the Oakland A's, which was to be directed by Soderbergh and star Pitt.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 24, 2006 | John Horn and Rachel Abramowitz, Times Staff Writers
For as long as Hollywood has made movies, its relationship with the truth has been as shaky as a hand-held camera. Actors -- and legions of others in the industry -- lie about their age; producers fudge the real costs of making movies; studio executives distort box-office grosses. One movie producer titled her memoir "Hello, He Lied." But can Hollywood handle the truth?
ENTERTAINMENT
November 19, 2005
RE "Hurry. Somebody Call Spider-Man," by John Horn, Nov. 14: Every movie genre has a simple formula. The good movies exploit that formula over and over, and the great ones add subtle twists. For the most part, the movies that did well for Sony had solid stories. It's almost inconceivable to me, as a produced screenwriter, that Sony executive Amy Pascal could possibly look at "Deuce Bigelow" or "Stealth" and declare, "It's always in the end about good stories and telling them well." I laughed harder at that quote than at anything I've seen in a Sony release all year.
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