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Amyloid

SCIENCE
December 26, 2013 | By Geoffrey Mohan
Elderly people who have both mild cognitive impairment and a history of serious concussion showed higher amounts of the protein deposits associated with Alzheimer's disease , according to a new study. The results, published Thursday in the journal Neurology, suggest a potential link between a history of head trauma and later cognitive decline. Researchers at the Mayo Clinic in Rochester, Minn., enlisted 589 elderly residents of surrounding Olmsted County, beginning in 2004, and administered a battery of cognitive and memory tests, along with brain scans that reveal both structure and metabolic function.
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NEWS
April 15, 1991 | THOMAS H. MAUGH II, TIMES SCIENCE WRITER
An important clue to the cause of memory loss associated with Alzheimer's disease has been discovered by researchers at City of Hope in Duarte. Biochemist Eugene Roberts and his City of Hope colleagues report today in the prestigious Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences that injections of fragments of a brain protein called beta-amyloid into the brains of mice cause the animals to forget tasks they have just learned.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 9, 1991 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
British scientists said last week that they had discovered a causal link between severe head injuries and Alzheimer's disease, a terminal brain disorder that afflicts an estimated 4 million elderly people in the United States. "It has been argued for a long time that Alzheimer's has several different causes. Our data is the first direct evidence that head injury may be one significant causative factor," said Dr. Gareth Roberts of London's St. Mary's Hospital Medical School.
HEALTH
January 22, 2007 | From Times wire reports
Scientists have identified a gene that increases the risk for late-onset Alzheimer's and provides another clue into the complex mind-robbing disease. The gene -- SORL1 -- stands out because it's been tested in four ethnic groups and a form of it seems to confer a risk in all of them -- including North Europeans, Caribbean Latinos, African Americans and Israeli Arabs.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 8, 1999
Vaccination with a protein that plays a key role in Alzheimer's disease can halt progression of an Alzheimer's-like disorder in mice and may even reverse some of the symptoms, according to a report in today's Nature. The protein, called AN-1792, is a modified form of beta-amyloid peptide, one of the proteins found in the plaques and tangles in the brain characteristic of Alzheimer's disease.
NEWS
December 3, 2010 | By Shari Roan, Los Angeles Times
Disease-modifying treatments for Alzheimer's disease have proved elusive. However, a study in mice published this week suggests that a treatment strategy relying on gene therapy may be worth pursuing. Researchers at the Gladstone Institute of Neurological Disease in San Francisco found that mice and humans with Alzheimer's disease have unusually low levels of an enzyme called EphB2 in the parts of the brain that control memory. EphB2 plays an important role in fostering communication between brain cells.
NEWS
October 22, 1999 | PAUL JACOBS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Scientists at Amgen have isolated an elusive brain chemical believed to play a crucial role in the development of Alzheimer's disease. Reporting their findings in today's edition of Science, the researchers hope the discovery will lead to targeted treatments that can halt the advance of this mind-devouring disease that afflicts an estimated 4 million Americans.
SCIENCE
August 19, 2013 | By Melissa Healy
New research finds that copper in amounts readily found in our drinking water, the foods we eat and the vitamin supplements we take likely plays a key role in initiating and fueling the abnormal protein build-up and brain inflammation that are hallmarks of Alzheimer's disease. While the mineral is important to healthy nerve conduction, hormone secretion and the growth of bones and connective tissue, a team of researchers from the University of Rochester Medical Center suggested that too much of it may be a bad thing, and they set about to explore copper's dark side.
SCIENCE
July 11, 2012 | By Thomas H. Maugh II, Los Angeles Times
Researchers have found the first gene mutation that protects against Alzheimer's disease, a finding that supports a now-controversial theory about the cause of the disease and that could eventually lead to the development of new drugs to treat the disorder. The gene mutation also protects against normal dementia of aging, suggesting that the two diseases have mechanisms in common. Alzheimer's affects an estimated 5.4 million Americans, and the prevalence increases with age: 13% of those older than 65 and 45% of those over the age of 85 have it. The disease is characterized by the buildup in the brain of particles called amyloid plaque, which are composed of a protein called amyloid beta.
HEALTH
September 20, 2010 | By Jill U Adams, Special to the Los Angeles Times
Alzheimer's disease is a scourge of old age, robbing people of their ability to hold a thought or manage simple tasks of daily life. Once the disease takes hold, it doesn't let up, progressively worsening until death. Modern medicine has yet to discover a cure. Scientists don't even know what causes Alzheimer's and are only beginning to tease out the main risk factors for developing the disease, besides age itself. One of the leading candidates is Type 2 diabetes, in which patients stop responding properly to insulin and can't convert glucose into energy.
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