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Anaheim Ca Transportation

CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 16, 1990
The state has reimbursed Anaheim for $4.5 million the city spent to build an overpass across busy Lincoln Avenue. Funds from the Public Utilities Commission repaid costs of the overpass that allows pedestrian access to Lincoln Elementary School and provides motorists with a more convenient route into downtown. The state makes such refunds to encourage local governments to redevelop areas as needed.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 1, 1990
The City Council voted this week to spend $3,000 to begin planning a pedestrian traffic signal at the busy intersection of Knott and Danbrook avenues, but residents who have been pleading for a signal in recent weeks said the council did not go far enough. "Once again, it appears we are getting the runaround," said resident Joe Van Gilder. "As Anaheim citizens, we deserve to be protected."
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 10, 1991 | KEVIN JOHNSON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Still reeling from its unsuccessful bid for $175 million in federal transportation funds, the city now plans to ask for $25 million for improvements to the Santa Ana Freeway that would improve access to the city's attractions. City officials said Friday that the money is needed for car-pool lanes and ramps from the Santa Ana Freeway and is not solely intended to boost the fortunes of Disneyland.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 10, 1991 | KEVIN JOHNSON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
It may not rank up there with a star on Hollywood Boulevard, but Gene Autry will take it just the same. In a step toward further immortalizing the man who brought professional baseball to Anaheim, City Council members renamed a half-mile stretch from the Santa Ana Freeway to Anaheim Stadium's front door Gene Autry Way. The decision comes less than a week before the California Angels owner welcomes his club back for the opening of the team's 1991 home season.
NEWS
May 5, 1991 | KENNETH REICH and JEFFREY A. PERLMAN, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
Plans by a group of California and Nevada officials for the world's first long-distance, high-speed magnetic levitation rail line between Las Vegas and Anaheim now face so many obstacles that it may never be built. It has long been clear that promoters would have to lobby hard for changes in state and federal laws to facilitate the project, which also could serve Palmdale and Los Angeles International Airport.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 22, 1989
The City Council voted Tuesday night to reduce its plan to widen congested intersections from 33 sites to 28. The $90-million city plan to widen the city's busiest intersections has brought opposition from property owners and people who work near the sites. "This whole thing is a conclusion searching for a plan," said Howard Sachar, president of Citizens for Traffic Solutions, a group opposing the city plan.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 28, 1989 | JIM QUINN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A bistate commission studying plans to build a high-speed rail system to Las Vegas on Friday selected Anaheim as the Southern California terminus but also voted for a spur that could link up with the San Fernando Valley. In unanimously designating Anaheim as the main terminus, members of the California-Nevada Super Speed Train Commission relied on a consultant's report that gives a strong edge to the Orange County city. An Anaheim-Las Vegas line, also stopping in Ontario, would draw 6.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 2, 1990 | LISA MASCARO
Six city officials have embarked on an annual trip to Washington in hopes of winning federal financial support for the city's anti-drug programs and a study of its proposed people-mover system. The delegation, which left Wednesday and is to return Sunday, is presenting an agenda that reflects the issues that Mayor Fred Hunter recognizes as the most important facing the city. Hunter was joined in Washington by Council members William D.
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