Advertisement
YOU ARE HERE: LAT HomeCollectionsAnatolia
IN THE NEWS

Anatolia

MORE STORIES ABOUT:
FEATURED ARTICLES
ENTERTAINMENT
April 6, 2012
'Once Upon a Time in Anatolia' No MPAA rating; in Turkish with English subtitles Running time: 2 hours, 37 minutes Playing: ATtLaemmle's Music Hall 3, Beverly Hills; Laemmle's Playhouse 7, Pasadena; Laemmle's Town Center 5, Encino
ARTICLES BY DATE
ENTERTAINMENT
April 6, 2012
'Once Upon a Time in Anatolia' No MPAA rating; in Turkish with English subtitles Running time: 2 hours, 37 minutes Playing: ATtLaemmle's Music Hall 3, Beverly Hills; Laemmle's Playhouse 7, Pasadena; Laemmle's Town Center 5, Encino
Advertisement
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 4, 2009
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 4, 2009
TRAVEL
September 1, 2002
As an Armenian American who has visited Anatolia, Turkey, I enjoyed Susan James' article "Anatolia, Where the Past Is the Present" (Aug. 11). Many Armenian Americans trace their ancestry to these areas, which were populated by Armenians for 2,500 years until 1915. The claim that Anatolia is an open-air museum is correct, at least for now. The Turkish government has a terrible record of protecting its non-Turkic antiquities. At the turn of the last century, there were more than 2,000 Armenian churches and antiquities in the area.
NEWS
June 28, 1985 | Associated Press
The crew of a Turkish Airlines jet overpowered a passenger who burst into the cockpit during a flight today crying "I want to blow up this plane" and sprayed the pilots with a fire extinguisher, Anatolia news agency reported. The Boeing 727, with 81 passengers aboard, landed safely in Istanbul, its destination, the agency said. The flight originated in Frankfurt, West Germany. Anatolia said the passenger, a Turk, was disgruntled because his West German work permit had been canceled.
OPINION
September 7, 2002
In "A Remedy in Iraq: Kurdish Autonomy" (Commentary, Sept. 3), David Perlmutter claims that "legally there should be an independent Kurdistan" since "the Treaty of Sevres, which delineated the breakup of the Ottoman Empire after World War I, recognized that the Kurds deserved their own state." To substantiate his argument, he chooses to ignore the historical fact that while the Istanbul government of the Ottoman Empire officially accepted the Treaty of Sevres on Aug. 10, 1920--a vindictive document that put the Turkish state under the financial and military control of the occupying powers--the Turkish nationalists in central Anatolia under the leadership of Mustafa Kemal Ataturk, founder and first president of the Republic of Turkey, rejected the document.
TRAVEL
February 26, 1995
Your article on Turkey ("Romancing the Stones," Feb. 5) was fantastic. Part of my early childhood passed in Bergama, Turkey, playing hide-and-seek in those ancient historical ruins. We also used to play a game called "dig," in which neighborhood kids packed their toy picks and shovels and played archeologist. Someone almost always found something which, we were taught early on, to turn over to the local museums. ERGUN KIRLIKOVALI Irvine Your article failed to mention one of the best tours.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 31, 2004 | Kai Maristed, Special to The Times
Something in us loves a maze. Clearly we derive a peculiar pleasure, at least a thrill, from experiencing confusion and physical disorientation. Else why are there fun houses at state fairs, or vegetation pruned into a complex of walls and cul-de-sacs, whether in an imperial garden or a farmer's just-harvested cornfield -- where for a buck or two anyone can have the adventure of getting lost then found?
BOOKS
April 10, 1988 | RICHARD EDER
Even at the height of his success as a Hollywood and Broadway director--he made "On the Waterfront" and "East of Eden," and staged "Death of a Salesman" and "Streetcar Named Desire"--Elia Kazan tells us that he detested the constraints of celebrity and longed to find authenticity by breaking away and working poor. It sounds like a familiar sort of pose, but it isn't. Or maybe it shows that if you live long enough, you can actually become what you pose as.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 31, 2004 | Kai Maristed, Special to The Times
Something in us loves a maze. Clearly we derive a peculiar pleasure, at least a thrill, from experiencing confusion and physical disorientation. Else why are there fun houses at state fairs, or vegetation pruned into a complex of walls and cul-de-sacs, whether in an imperial garden or a farmer's just-harvested cornfield -- where for a buck or two anyone can have the adventure of getting lost then found?
OPINION
September 7, 2002
In "A Remedy in Iraq: Kurdish Autonomy" (Commentary, Sept. 3), David Perlmutter claims that "legally there should be an independent Kurdistan" since "the Treaty of Sevres, which delineated the breakup of the Ottoman Empire after World War I, recognized that the Kurds deserved their own state." To substantiate his argument, he chooses to ignore the historical fact that while the Istanbul government of the Ottoman Empire officially accepted the Treaty of Sevres on Aug. 10, 1920--a vindictive document that put the Turkish state under the financial and military control of the occupying powers--the Turkish nationalists in central Anatolia under the leadership of Mustafa Kemal Ataturk, founder and first president of the Republic of Turkey, rejected the document.
TRAVEL
September 1, 2002
As an Armenian American who has visited Anatolia, Turkey, I enjoyed Susan James' article "Anatolia, Where the Past Is the Present" (Aug. 11). Many Armenian Americans trace their ancestry to these areas, which were populated by Armenians for 2,500 years until 1915. The claim that Anatolia is an open-air museum is correct, at least for now. The Turkish government has a terrible record of protecting its non-Turkic antiquities. At the turn of the last century, there were more than 2,000 Armenian churches and antiquities in the area.
TRAVEL
August 11, 2002 | SUSAN E. JAMES
My mother always wanted to see Mt. Ararat. Not so much for the Noah story, but because, like Timbuktu, it seemed impossibly remote. I always wanted to see the Silk Road town of Diyarbakir for much the same reason. Both are in eastern Turkey, and for the last several decades, both have been extraordinarily difficult to get to. Until recently, this area was so politically sensitive that the Turkish government actively discouraged tourists from going there. That has changed.
BOOKS
August 10, 1997 | CHRISTOPHER HITCHENS, Christopher Hitchens is the author of "When the Borders Bleed: The Struggle of the Kurds" and "Hostage to History: Cyprus From the Ottomans to Kissinger." He is also a columnist for Vanity Fair and the Nation
The people of Armenia--a portion of whose diaspora live in the United States--are easily recognizable by the patronymic suffix "-ian" on their names. They tend, on principle, not to anglicize this unless their families were late in departing from Anatolia (in which case, as a friend of mine from that region once dryly phrased it, "better to cut three letters than the whole neck"). The middle name in all Armenian families is also uniform and transmitted through the generations. It is "Survival."
TRAVEL
February 26, 1995
Your article on Turkey ("Romancing the Stones," Feb. 5) was fantastic. Part of my early childhood passed in Bergama, Turkey, playing hide-and-seek in those ancient historical ruins. We also used to play a game called "dig," in which neighborhood kids packed their toy picks and shovels and played archeologist. Someone almost always found something which, we were taught early on, to turn over to the local museums. ERGUN KIRLIKOVALI Irvine Your article failed to mention one of the best tours.
TRAVEL
August 11, 2002 | SUSAN E. JAMES
My mother always wanted to see Mt. Ararat. Not so much for the Noah story, but because, like Timbuktu, it seemed impossibly remote. I always wanted to see the Silk Road town of Diyarbakir for much the same reason. Both are in eastern Turkey, and for the last several decades, both have been extraordinarily difficult to get to. Until recently, this area was so politically sensitive that the Turkish government actively discouraged tourists from going there. That has changed.
TRAVEL
February 5, 1995 | Dale Brown, Brown, based in Virginia, is editor of Time-Life Books' archeological adventure series, "Lost Civilizations." and
I love a good ruin. And so, it seems, do a lot of other people if the growing number of archeological tours being advertised in newspapers and magazines is any indicator. I have been particularly drawn to the classical world and have searched out its monuments in the course of my travels. One day, however, I realized that I was visiting only the wonderful cliches of history--the Parthenon, the Coliseum, the Roman Forum--and not the less trammeled but equally exciting remains of Greek and Roman imperial greatness that lie tumbled all around the edges of the Aegean and Mediterranean seas.
Los Angeles Times Articles
|