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NEWS
May 22, 1987 | Associated Press
A clinic founded by black activist Winnie Mandela was destroyed by fire Thursday in a small town where she lived in internal exile for eight years. Police said arson was suspected. Mandela, wife of jailed African National Congress leader Nelson Mandela, told reporters she believes the fire was set in retaliation for two car bombings Wednesday. The government has blamed ANC guerrillas for the blasts, which killed three white policemen and injured 15 people outside a Johannesburg courthouse.
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NEWS
June 4, 1998 | From Times Wire Reports
A notorious apartheid-era police colonel linked former President Pieter W. Botha to violent attacks on anti-government groups. The former colonel, Eugene de Kock, who is serving a 212-year sentence for murders and other crimes, testified that he bombed the London offices of the then-banned African National Congress, or ANC, a South African church headquarters and trade union offices during Botha's 1978-89 rule.
NEWS
November 4, 1986 | United Press International
Soviet leader Mikhail S. Gorbachev met today with African National Congress President Oliver Tambo and pledged the Soviet Union's support in the ANC's battle to overthrow the South African system of apartheid. Tass, the official press agency, said both leaders denounced the U.S. policy of constructive engagement with Pretoria and Washington's interference in the internal affairs of neighboring Angola through its support of Jonas Savimbi's UNITA rebel group.
NEWS
July 10, 1987 | MICHAEL PARKS, Times Staff Writer
Fifty prominent white South Africans, defying their government, opened three days of talks with the outlawed African National Congress here Thursday on a strategy to end apartheid and establish a democratic political system for their country. Frederick van Zyl Slabbert, leader of the white delegation of politicians, businessmen, clergy, academics, writers and students, said the meeting would discuss "alternatives to the brutal catastrophe unfolding inside our common fatherland."
OPINION
December 5, 2013 | By Douglas Foster
"Isn't Mandela still president?" That startling question came from a homeless teenager in a Cape Town township during an interview in 2007, as I set off around South Africa to explore the meaning of freedom in the lives of young people. At first, I thought Jonathan was pulling my leg. A gangly 17-year-old, he loved to tease outsiders. By then, Mandela had been out of office for eight years, having famously stepped away from power after a single term as president. His successors, Thabo Mbeki and Jacob Zuma, were in the midst of a nasty, enervating battle for control of the ruling party, the African National Congress, and stories about their schism led nearly every newscast.
NEWS
August 16, 1987 | MICHAEL PARKS, Times Staff Writer
Joe Slovo is the man most feared by white South Africans, the man whose calls for greater "revolutionary violence" seem intended to plunge the country into chaos, the man whose dreams of a Communist South Africa give them nightmares.
WORLD
December 5, 2013 | By Robyn Dixon
JOHANNESBURG, South Africa - An irritable man who got cross when he couldn't have his favorite brand of mineral water? A fusser who obsessively folded his daily newspapers just so, who got annoyed if things weren't lined up in their precise order? An aloof man who nonetheless flirted with any pretty young woman he met? Could these accounts really tally with one of the world's most beloved men, Nelson Mandela? In his lifetime, Mandela always insisted that he wasn't a saint, and by all accounts was quite irritated with the gilded view of him as an almost mystical figure.
NEWS
August 6, 1987 | MICHAEL PARKS, Times Staff Writer
Twenty-five years ago Wednesday, when South African authorities arrested Nelson Mandela, they believed they had broken the African National Congress and brought to a quick end its "armed struggle" against minority white rule. Today, Mandela remains a prisoner, serving a life sentence for sabotage in an effort to overthrow the government. But now the government of President Pieter W. Botha finds itself effectively a political hostage to Mandela.
WORLD
March 19, 2014 | By Robyn Dixon
JOHANNESBURG, South Africa - South African President Jacob Zuma personally benefited from a $23-million state-paid “security” upgrade to his private residence in rural KwaZulu-Natal, according to South Africa's public protector, an official with the duties of an ombudsman. Her findings over a scandal known in South Africa as “Nkandla-gate” -- a reference to the name of Zuma's homestead - are highly damaging to the governing African National Congress with less than two months to an election.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 22, 1990
Jeane Kirkpatrick seems to like the word "democracy." She uses it or a derivative six times in her column ("A Color-Blind Peace Depends on Democracy," Commentary, June 11): I do not know what her definition of democracy is. I am sure that most of the people of the world including those in South Africa have little idea of the meaning, advantages and responsibilities of a democratic government. Kirkpatrick speaks of "democracy and comfort for whites." Does she equate privilege with democracy?
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