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FOOD
April 14, 1994 | ROBERT L. BALZER
News of the death of pioneer winemaker Andre Tchelistcheff in Napa Valley last Wednesday profoundly saddened the wine world. The news was not unexpected. Months ago, the diminutive, deep-voiced aristocrat, still seemingly hale and hearty--despite his 92 years--and working a schedule that might fatigue anyone half his age, was diagnosed with cancer of the esophagus. Even the torturous rigors of radiation did not stop his vineyard and winery routines.
ARTICLES BY DATE
FOOD
April 14, 1994 | DAN BERGER, TIMES WINE WRITER
The eyes beneath those formidable brows were deep-set, intense--and, at the moment, angry. It was 1981 and I was judging Pinot Noirs at the Sonoma County Harvest Fair wine competition. Beside me was the man with the deep-set eyes, legendary winemaker Andre Tchelistcheff, who died April 5 at age 92. We were part of a five-person panel. Voting on wine No. 8, Andre firmly said: "Gold medal!" I concurred. The other panelists voted no award, so the wine was discarded.
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NEWS
April 7, 1994 | DAN BERGER, TIMES WINE WRITER
Andre Tchelistcheff, America's pioneer maker of fine wines who helped dozens of wineries get their start, has died in the Napa Valley. He was 92. Tchelistcheff, who had worked a full schedule until recently, died Tuesday at Queen of Valley Hospital in Napa. He was found to have cancer of the esophagus three months ago and underwent surgery last week for removal of a stomach tumor.
FOOD
April 14, 1994 | ROBERT L. BALZER
News of the death of pioneer winemaker Andre Tchelistcheff in Napa Valley last Wednesday profoundly saddened the wine world. The news was not unexpected. Months ago, the diminutive, deep-voiced aristocrat, still seemingly hale and hearty--despite his 92 years--and working a schedule that might fatigue anyone half his age, was diagnosed with cancer of the esophagus. Even the torturous rigors of radiation did not stop his vineyard and winery routines.
FOOD
April 14, 1994 | DAN BERGER, TIMES WINE WRITER
The eyes beneath those formidable brows were deep-set, intense--and, at the moment, angry. It was 1981 and I was judging Pinot Noirs at the Sonoma County Harvest Fair wine competition. Beside me was the man with the deep-set eyes, legendary winemaker Andre Tchelistcheff, who died April 5 at age 92. We were part of a five-person panel. Voting on wine No. 8, Andre firmly said: "Gold medal!" I concurred. The other panelists voted no award, so the wine was discarded.
MAGAZINE
November 16, 1986 | ROBERT LAWRENCE BALZER
Andre Tchelistcheff is one of the world's most revered and respected wine makers; he's received virtually every award the wine world has to offer. In September, he was honored at a dinner commemorating his 20 years as enological consultant to Washington state's Chateau Ste. Michelle--the most outstanding winery of the Pacific Northwest--and the 10th anniversary of the opening of the winery's handsome facilities in Woodinville, near Seattle. And though he'll turn 85 on Dec.
FOOD
October 31, 1991 | DAN BERGER, TIMES WINE WRITER
Andre Tchelistcheff once got a call from tire fortune heir Brooks Firestone, who said he wanted to start a winery. "Good," said Tchelistcheff. "How much money have you got to lose?" It wasn't the first time he'd tried to dissuade a would-be winemaker. In the '40s, the late Fred McCrea, a retired advertising man, asked Tchelistcheff to help him plant a property.
BUSINESS
October 23, 1986
The 1986 wine-grape harvest and crush, completed this week, weighed in at 2.7 million tons, about 4% less than last year. But what the crop lacked in numbers it apparently made up for in quality, said the Wine Institute, a trade group. The growing season got off to a mid-winter start, thanks to an unseasonal warm spell, then cooled off to stretch out the growth and finally ended in August--the earliest finish that many old-timers could recall.
BOOKS
July 16, 1995 | CHRIS GOODRICH
DREAMS OF THE VALLEY: A Portrait of the Napa Valley by Cheryll Aimee Barron (Scribner: $25; 317 pp.). If you take travel books on faith--especially literary works that profess to illuminate the soul of another culture--consider picking up this volume as a necessary corrective. "Dreams of the Valley" is probably as accurate as the typical travel book, but reading it is like getting a tour of one's back yard by someone who's just moved to town.
FOOD
November 27, 2002 | David Shaw, Times Staff Writer
If you're a relative neophyte in the world of wine and are about to fly to visit Napa Valley for the first time -- or maybe even the second or third -- here's a suggestion: Buy the CD "Napa Uncorked," put it in your suitcase, pop it into the CD player in your rental car -- or your car, if you drive the whole way -- and by the time you get to Napa, you'll no longer be a neophyte.
NEWS
April 7, 1994 | DAN BERGER, TIMES WINE WRITER
Andre Tchelistcheff, America's pioneer maker of fine wines who helped dozens of wineries get their start, has died in the Napa Valley. He was 92. Tchelistcheff, who had worked a full schedule until recently, died Tuesday at Queen of Valley Hospital in Napa. He was found to have cancer of the esophagus three months ago and underwent surgery last week for removal of a stomach tumor.
FOOD
October 31, 1991 | DAN BERGER, TIMES WINE WRITER
Andre Tchelistcheff once got a call from tire fortune heir Brooks Firestone, who said he wanted to start a winery. "Good," said Tchelistcheff. "How much money have you got to lose?" It wasn't the first time he'd tried to dissuade a would-be winemaker. In the '40s, the late Fred McCrea, a retired advertising man, asked Tchelistcheff to help him plant a property.
MAGAZINE
November 16, 1986 | ROBERT LAWRENCE BALZER
Andre Tchelistcheff is one of the world's most revered and respected wine makers; he's received virtually every award the wine world has to offer. In September, he was honored at a dinner commemorating his 20 years as enological consultant to Washington state's Chateau Ste. Michelle--the most outstanding winery of the Pacific Northwest--and the 10th anniversary of the opening of the winery's handsome facilities in Woodinville, near Seattle. And though he'll turn 85 on Dec.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 13, 1998 | DAN BERGER, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Maynard A. Amerine, a virtual textbook on winemaking and a powerful force in guiding the California wine industry's recovery from Prohibition, has died. He was 86. Amerine, who suffered from Alzheimer's disease, died Wednesday night at his home in St. Helena in the Napa Valley. He was a founder and later chairman of the department of viticulture and oenology at UC Davis, which became known worldwide as a wine research center.
MAGAZINE
March 11, 1990 | Robert Lawrence Balzer \f7
WITH ELEGANT GRACE, the waiter presented the bottle of Chardonnay for my approval. Fremont Creek . The simple, contemporary label was new to me. It conveyed the idea of a tumbling rivulet. Nice. Clean. I leaned forward to determine the vintage--1988. Produced and bottled by Beckstoffer Vineyards. I nodded, and the wine was poured. Andy Beckstoffer, my host, waited for my reaction.
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