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Andrew Marton

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NEWS
April 9, 2008
Heston obituary: The obituary of actor Charlton Heston in Section A on Sunday said the chariot race in the film "Ben-Hur" was directed by Yakima Canutt. In fact, the sequence was filmed and directed by Andrew Marton.
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NEWS
April 17, 2008
Heston obituary: The obituary of Charlton Heston in the April 6 A section reported that Yakima Canutt directed the chariot race scene in the film "Ben-Hur," and a subsequent correction said Andrew Marton was the director. Both men were second-unit directors on the film, according to the on-screen credits and the Directors Guild of America. According to the American Film Institute Catalog of Feature Films, "Contemporary information . . . and modern interviews suggest that, while Marton was responsible for the overall staging and shooting of the sequence, Canutt was responsible for coordinating the actors, stuntmen, horses and chariots for the race itself."
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TRAVEL
August 20, 1989
Andrew Marton is a great writer ("A Scandalous Tour of Washington," July 16), but did he really take this tour? I doubt it or else he sat in the first row. I read this in The Times and immediately booked for Aug. 5. The idea is great and the performances looked like they might be fun, if you could hear them. The acoustics were so bad on the bus, so distorted that one was forced to listen so hard that one did not have time to listen for the scandal. Too bad because the idea is great.
BOOKS
February 25, 1996
For years the assumption was that William Wyler directed the famous "Ben Hur" chariot race, and now we have an attempt to set the record straight by giving Yakima Canutt the credit (in Steven Bach's review of Jan Herman's "A Talent for Trouble: The Life of Hollywood's Most Acclaimed Director, William Wyler," Jan. 7). While it is true that Canutt worked with the actors and stuntmen, it is not fair to name him as director of the chariot race. The name on the slate as director was "Marton," and it was Andrew "Bundy" Marton who dramatized the race, designing the many, many shots in such a way as to get them to work as a seamless tour de force.
TRAVEL
July 30, 1989
The Travel Section is my favorite reading of the week. Doublefold then was my shock and disgust at the tasteless article by Andrew Marton, "A Scandalous Tour of Washington" (July 16). Has the Travel Section stooped to trash and scandal techniques as TV and yellow journalism (have)? I hope not. The article has no place in (the) wholesome, intellectual, if you will, pursuit of normal American entertainment. We look to the Travel Section for enjoyment and helpful tips on places to go, what to see. Not this trash.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 7, 1991
Regarding "You Heard It Here First" by Jack Mathews, March 24: It was unfair to write about Kevin Costner not directing all the scenes in "Dances With Wolves" without letting readers know this is not uncommon. William Wyler won an Oscar for directing "Ben-Hur" (1959) but did not direct that film's most famous scene, the chariot race. It was directed by Andrew Marton and Yakima Canutt. Marton also directed the scene of the boats massing for Dunkirk in "Mrs. Miniver" (1942), another Oscar winner for Wyler.
BOOKS
February 25, 1996
For years the assumption was that William Wyler directed the famous "Ben Hur" chariot race, and now we have an attempt to set the record straight by giving Yakima Canutt the credit (in Steven Bach's review of Jan Herman's "A Talent for Trouble: The Life of Hollywood's Most Acclaimed Director, William Wyler," Jan. 7). While it is true that Canutt worked with the actors and stuntmen, it is not fair to name him as director of the chariot race. The name on the slate as director was "Marton," and it was Andrew "Bundy" Marton who dramatized the race, designing the many, many shots in such a way as to get them to work as a seamless tour de force.
NEWS
January 10, 1992 | BURT A. FOLKART, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Andrew Marton, a film director probably best known for spectacular action sequences and who once spent four months preparing the 10-minute chariot race segment for the 1959 version of "Ben-Hur," died Tuesday of pneumonia in St. John's Hospital and Health Center in Santa Monica. His daughter, Tonda Marton-Bayer, said her Hungarian-born father, who came to this country with Ernst Lubitsch in 1923, was 87.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 3, 2005 | Adam Bernstein, Washington Post
Endre Marton, an Associated Press diplomatic reporter in Washington, D.C., best known for his dispatches from his native Hungary, where he briefly was a political prisoner, died Tuesday at his daughter's home in New York. No cause of death was disclosed. He was 95. A former economist, Marton switched to journalism in postwar Budapest.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 15, 2001 | SUSAN KING, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Winner of 11 Oscars and considered by some to be the greatest biblical epic ever made, "Ben-Hur" arrives on DVD in a lovely special edition (Warner Bros., $25). Directed by William Wyler, this 1959 extravaganza is based on Gen. Lew Wallace's "Tale of the Christ." Charlton Heston received an Oscar for his performance as the rich, honorable Jewish man Judah Ben-Hur. Stephen Boyd also excels as his Roman boyhood friend, Messala, who becomes Ben-Hur's bitter enemy.
NEWS
January 10, 1992 | BURT A. FOLKART, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Andrew Marton, a film director probably best known for spectacular action sequences and who once spent four months preparing the 10-minute chariot race segment for the 1959 version of "Ben-Hur," died Tuesday of pneumonia in St. John's Hospital and Health Center in Santa Monica. His daughter, Tonda Marton-Bayer, said her Hungarian-born father, who came to this country with Ernst Lubitsch in 1923, was 87.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 7, 1991
Regarding "You Heard It Here First" by Jack Mathews, March 24: It was unfair to write about Kevin Costner not directing all the scenes in "Dances With Wolves" without letting readers know this is not uncommon. William Wyler won an Oscar for directing "Ben-Hur" (1959) but did not direct that film's most famous scene, the chariot race. It was directed by Andrew Marton and Yakima Canutt. Marton also directed the scene of the boats massing for Dunkirk in "Mrs. Miniver" (1942), another Oscar winner for Wyler.
TRAVEL
August 20, 1989
Andrew Marton is a great writer ("A Scandalous Tour of Washington," July 16), but did he really take this tour? I doubt it or else he sat in the first row. I read this in The Times and immediately booked for Aug. 5. The idea is great and the performances looked like they might be fun, if you could hear them. The acoustics were so bad on the bus, so distorted that one was forced to listen so hard that one did not have time to listen for the scandal. Too bad because the idea is great.
TRAVEL
July 30, 1989
The Travel Section is my favorite reading of the week. Doublefold then was my shock and disgust at the tasteless article by Andrew Marton, "A Scandalous Tour of Washington" (July 16). Has the Travel Section stooped to trash and scandal techniques as TV and yellow journalism (have)? I hope not. The article has no place in (the) wholesome, intellectual, if you will, pursuit of normal American entertainment. We look to the Travel Section for enjoyment and helpful tips on places to go, what to see. Not this trash.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 7, 1996
Your March 31 cover states that Cybill Shepherd can still be "cranky" about history. In my opinion, you've done Cybill an injustice by summing up her feelings about the past with such a seemingly sexist and derogatory statement. I will venture that most women who have survived the injustices of the predominantly male-driven entertainment industry would side with Cybill. Forgive, but at the risk of losing your sanity and career goals, don't ever forget. Cybill hasn't forgotten the pain and, in my opinion, it has helped to make her the successful actress-executive she is today.
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