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Andrew Young

BOOKS
December 29, 1996 | JULIAN BOND
Andrew Young's story of his life, his work as Martin Luther King Jr.'s aide and his election to Congress in 1972 is an invaluable addition to the growing list of civil rights histories. He is only the second member of King's intimate circle to offer an inside view of the people who led the movement. Young was present at the times and places America rid itself of legalized white supremacy.
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NEWS
July 28, 1996 | LISA DILLMAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
I love everybody, I love everybody, I love everybody in my heart. You can't make me doubt him, you can't make me doubt him, you can't make me doubt him in my heart. Because I know too much about him, know too much about him, know too much about him in my heart. --Andrew Young, singing Saturday at a prayer service * Andrew Young's voice rang out loud and clear Saturday in Central United Methodist Church at a prayer service arranged in the wake of the bombing at Centennial Olympic Park.
SPORTS
January 1, 1995 | SAM FULWOOD III, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Former U.N. Ambassador and Atlanta Mayor Andrew Young painted a rosy portrait of the 1996 Olympic Games in Atlanta, saying Los Angeles' experience taught that the event "could be done as a private-sector project rather than a government project." And he predicted the Games will work to the long-term good of Atlanta because civic leaders have included all segments of the city in the Olympic planning process.
NEWS
December 30, 1994 | SAM FULWOOD III, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Former U.N. ambassador and Atlanta mayor Andrew Young on Thursday dismissed oft-repeated suggestions that the political difficulties facing President Clinton and his party stem from a growing conservatism in the nation. Rather, Young said, the GOP takeover of Congress is the result of the Democratic Party's failure to communicate with its most likely supporters and is not a judgment against its or Clinton's policies.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 2, 1994 | REBECCA BRYANT
When Andrew Young addresses graduating CSUN honors students this weekend about overcoming adversity, he speaks with the power of history--personal history. Young, formerly mayor of Atlanta and U. S. ambassador to the United Nations, faced bigots, batons and bars of prison cells in his earlier work as a civil rights leader. As a top aide to Martin Luther King Jr., he knew of struggle. The students he will address know a little of that themselves. Less than five months after the 6.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 19, 1994 | SUSAN BYRNES
Civil rights leader Andrew Young, who last month urged Cal State Northridge students to see the earthquake "not as something to be spurned, but as an opportunity," has accepted an invitation to deliver the honors convocation address at the university in early June. The former mayor of Atlanta and U. S. ambassador to the United Nations is vice chairman of Law Companies Group Inc., an engineering and environmental services firm working on the CSUN campus.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 9, 1994 | JILL LEOVY
Civil rights leader Andrew Young urged Cal State Northridge students to see the earthquake "not as something to be spurned, but as an opportunity," in a speech he gave on campus Tuesday. The Jan. 17 earthquake damaged dozens of campus buildings. Young, former mayor of Atlanta and former U.S. ambassador to the United Nations, compared the problems it has caused to the kind of crises he dealt with as mayor of Atlanta, and to those he helped create in the fight for civil rights.
NEWS
October 12, 1993 | ERIC HARRISON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Atlanta chooses a new mayor in November and perhaps the most noteworthy thing that can be said about the winner, whoever it will be, is that it won't be Maynard Jackson or Andrew Young. For 20 years Jackson and Young have handed leadership of the South's preeminent city back and forth between them as if they were taking turns with a favored dance partner.
OPINION
September 12, 1993 | ROBERT SCHEER, Before Andrew Young was U.S. ambassador to the United Nations, he was elected to Congress from Georgia for three terms. He later served two terms as mayor of Atlanta. He now is vice president of an Atlanta engineering and environmental consulting firm. As told to Robert Scheer
Fourteen years ago, late on a Saturday afternoon, I went with my 5-year-old son to visit the Kuwaiti ambassador at his home near the United Nations. I knew that (Zehdi Labib) Terzi, the representative of the PLO, was likely to be there, but I thought it was important for me to talk with him because even then, the Palestinians were ready to recognize Israel. The meeting blew up into a big fiasco--U.S. officials were not supposed to talk to the PLO--and led to my resignation.
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