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BUSINESS
June 17, 2011 | Bloomberg News
Shares of Research in Motion Ltd. dropped 21.5% to their lowest level since 2006 on Friday after the BlackBerry smartphone maker said quarterly revenue might drop for the first time in nine years and unveiled plans to reduce jobs. Revenue will be $4.2 billion to $4.8 billion in the fiscal second quarter, RIM said Thursday. That was less than the average analyst estimate for sales of $5.47 billion, according to a Bloomberg survey. Profit this quarter will be 75 cents to $1.05 a share.
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BUSINESS
April 24, 2012 | Bloomberg News
Google Inc. Chairman Eric Schmidt testified that his company developed the Android operating system using the Java programming language after partnership talks with Sun Microsystems Inc. fell through and Sun made no demand for a license to use Java. Sun sought $30 million to $50 million and tight control over Java's use for Android, Schmidt told jurors Tuesday in federal court in San Francisco during Oracle Corp.'s trial against Google. When deal negotiations fell through in 2006, Google built the Android software for mobile devices using aspects of the Java platform without infringing on Sun's intellectual property, he said.
BUSINESS
March 14, 2013 | By Jessica Guynn
SAN FRANCISCO -- Google's senior ranks continue to shuffle with Jeff Huber stepping down as head of mapping and commerce. Huber will move to Google X, the lab run by Google co-founder Sergey Brin that is working on experimental projects such as the wearable computer Google Glass and self-driving cars, a person familiar with the situation said. The move was first reported by the Wall Street Journal. With Huber's departure, the mapping division will join the Google search team led by Alan Eustace and the commerce division will move under the advertising group led by Susan Wojcicki.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 25, 2013 | By Dawn C. Chmielewski
As Internet video streaming becomes more commonplace in American households, a maker of dedicated devices introduced a new lineup of products and expanded programming options in hopes of capitalizing on this trend. Roku unveiled three new streaming players, priced at $50 to $80, that it says will offer high-definition video, among other features. These devices, with names only a geek could love (the Roku LT, Roku 1 and Roku 2), reach stores in October. Roku also is adding the M-Go movie and television service to its entertainment offerings.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 22, 2012 | By Jessica Guynn
Google Chief Executive Larry Page has reassured employees that he does not have a serious medical condition and that he will continue to run the search giant. Page delivered the news in an email to employees Thursday after skipping the company's annual shareholder meeting that day, the Wall Street Journal reported . In the email, Page said: "There is nothing seriously wrong with me. " Page has been having trouble with his voice, said Executive Chairman Eric Schmidt, who filled in for him Thursday.
BUSINESS
May 23, 2012 | By Michelle Maltais
A district court jury in Northern California cleared Google of infringing patents held by Oracle in six claims brought by the company. But the verdict isn't the end of the case. Oracle sued Google in August 2010, alleging Google's Android phone software infringed patents and copyrights covering Java. The first part of the trial over Java copyright claims ended in a mixed verdict. Despite the result of that trial, in which Google was found to have infringed only a small segment of Java code, it appears Oracle plans to pursue significant damages.
OPINION
January 29, 2013
Cellphone users know that when they sign a contract with a mobile phone company, they're locked into that network for the duration of the deal. What they may not know is that their phone is digitally locked to that network forever. And as of this week, they may no longer have the legal right to unlock it, even after the contract has expired. It's just the latest example of how companies have stretched copyright law to deter competition and innovation, not protect the creators of copyrighted works.
BUSINESS
October 4, 2011 | By David Pierson, Los Angeles Times
Xiong Mingjian is often crushed into a corner during his tedious subway commutes, but passing the time has been easy since he bought a nifty new cellphone. The 27-year-old store clerk surfs the Internet and taps away at games on his Motorola Defy, one of an increasing number of popular high-end mobile phones that are helping China shed its label as a knockoff haven. For years, copycat cellphones have thrived in a country famed for counterfeiting many things, such as Gucci handbags, Hollywood DVDs and, most recently, Apple retail stores.
BUSINESS
May 5, 2011 | By Dawn C. Chmielewski, Los Angeles Time
Warner Bros. has acquired Flixster Inc., an online social network that each month attracts millions of movie buffs and is the corporate parent of popular movie review site Rotten Tomatoes. The studio owned by Time Warner Inc. hopes to use the online community, where people read and write reviews, watch trailers and check movie times, as a launching pad to spur advertising sales. It plans to add tools that help people access and manage their digital movie collections online, in the same way they now do with their digital photographs or music playlists.
BUSINESS
February 14, 2013 | By Jessica Guynn
SAN FRANCISCO -- Sebastian Holst makes yoga mobile apps with his wife, a yoga instructor. The Mobile Yogi is sold in all the major mobile app stores. But when someone buys his app in the Google Play store, Holst automatically gets something he says he didn't ask for: the buyer's full name, location and email address. He says consumers are not aware that Google Inc. is sharing their personal information with third parties. No other app store transmits users' personal information to third-party developers when they buy apps, he said.
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