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Andy Griffith

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NATIONAL
July 4, 2012 | By Rene Lynch
With Andy Griffith's passing, America loses one of its last living links to the early days of television. "This is a big one," pop culture expert Robert J. Thompson said. "Andy Griffith was just one person. But he's symbolic of that era. With his death, the early days of television have receded into history and the stuff of museums, and directors' commentary on DVD. " To be sure, there are a few icons left who can speak about the start of traditional commercial network programming back in 1948, such as Dick Van Dyke and Sid Caesar.
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ENTERTAINMENT
March 22, 2013
'Romeo Killer' gets OK Lifetime won a major victory in a New York appeals court Thursday, allowing the network to televise its ripped-from-the-headlines movie, "Romeo Killer: The Chris Porco Story," on Saturday night as originally planned. Earlier this week, a New York state judge had issued an injunction that would have blocked the network from broadcasting its production about a grisly killing in November 2004 in upstate New York. The convicted killer, Christopher Porco, filed suit to protest the project, claiming the story was a "fictionalized" account and that use of his name and likeness for such a commercial venture had not been authorized.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 18, 1996 | NICHOLAS RICCARDI
The son of actor Andy Griffith was found dead early Wednesday by a roommate, but investigators say there are no signs of foul play. Andy Samuel Griffith Jr., 38, was found about 4:20 a.m. in his home in the 3100 block of Ellington Drive near Universal City, Los Angeles County coroner's spokesman Scott Carrier said. Los Angeles police officers responded to the scene, but Carrier said there were no signs of foul play.
OPINION
July 10, 2012
Re "Actor played heavies but had a light side," Obituary, July 9 As a young actor in the mid-1970s, I had the pleasure of having small roles in forgettable made-for-TV movies with both Andy Griffith and Ernest Borgnine, two legendary actors that we've recently lost. The scene I had with Borgnine was as a rookie cop partnered with a lifer on a rainy New York street, shot late at night, on a cold, wet Paramount set. Borgnine went out of his way to make sure that I was comfortable with not only the scene but the weather.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 3, 2012 | By Chris Barton
Though best remembered for his small-screen starring roles on "The Andy Griffith Show"and "Matlock," the late Andy Griffith also enjoyed some stage time early in his career. Before he was Sheriff Andy Taylor keeping watch on Mayberry, Griffith starred as Private Will Stockdale in the 1955 Air Force comedy "No Time for Sergeants," which ran for nearly 800 performances until 1957 and also marked the Broadway debut for Griffiths' future TV costar, Don Knotts. The play was based on a novel by Mac Hyman, which was adapted for the stage by Ira Levin (who would go on to write the novel"Rosemary's Baby")
ENTERTAINMENT
July 3, 2012 | By Randy Lewis
Andy Griffith's background as a singer and guitarist were obvious during the long run of “The Andy Griffith Show,” in which he would periodically pull out a guitar to strum and sing a bit. He also welcomed the opportunity to incorporate other bona-fide musicians onto the set when producers invited the Dillards bluegrass group from the Ozark Mountains to portray a family band called the Darlings. The Dillards -- fronted by brothers Douglas and Rodney Dillard -- had moved to Los Angeles from Missouri in the early '60s looking to broaden their audience.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 3, 2012 | By Ron Howard, Special to the Los Angeles Times
Early in the second season of "The Andy Griffith Show," I ventured a suggestion for a line change to make it sound more "like the way a kid would say it. " I was just 7 years old. But my idea was accepted and I remember standing frozen, thrilled at what this moment represented to me. Andy asked me, "What you grinnin' at, youngin'?" I said it was the first idea of mine they'd ever said yes to. Without a pause, Andy responded for all to hear: "It was the first idea that was any damn good.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 3, 2012 | By Patrick Kevin Day
Andy Griffith may no longer be with us, but his passing is providing an opportunity for cable TV to bring back some of his most beloved work. TV Land plans to air marathons of "The Andy Andy Griffith Show" on Wednesday, July 4, from 8 a.m. to 1 p.m. ET/PT and on Saturday and Sunday from 11 a.m. to 8 p.m. ET/PT. That's 46 of the 249 episodes of "The Andy Griffith Show. " Meanwhile, Me-TV plans to honor Griffith's less well known TV guest spots with episodes of"Hawaii Five-O,""Mod Squad," "Gomer Pyle" and the "Make Room For Daddy" ep that featured Griffith as a guest star.
NEWS
July 3, 2012 | By Morgan Little
Actor Andy Griffith, who passed away Tuesday at the age of 86 , wasn't just the beloved sheriff of fictional Mayberry, N.C., or the titular defense lawyer in “Matlock.” Griffith also played a prominent role in supporting Democratic politicians, usually in his home state of North Carolina. Griffith's role in politics was limited to endorsements. Though he was rumored to be a possible Democratic candidate to run against the late Sen. Jesse Helms in 1990, he ended the short-lived speculation . “I'm an actor.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 3, 2012 | By Susan King
Andy Griffith, who died Tuesday at the age of 86, was best known for his folksy homespun humor as Sheriff Andy Taylor on the classic “The Andy Griffith Show,” but he was first introduced to film audiences as a dramatic actor of conviction and power. The North Carolina native, who started as a stand-up comedian and had scored with audiences on both “The Steve Allen Show” and “The Ed Sullivan Show,” made his film debut in 1957's “A Face in the Crowd,” director Elia Kazan and his “On the Waterfront” screenwriter Budd Schulberg's dark social commentary.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 6, 2012 | By Patrick Kevin Day
Andy Griffith, who died on Tuesday at age 86, passed away as the result of a heart attack that occurred 24 hours earlier, according to his death certificate. The certificate was filed Thursday with the vital records office in Dare County, N.C., and its contents reported by the Associated Press. The actor best known for his roles on "The Andy Griffith Show" and " Matlock " died at 7 a.m. on Tuesday and had suffered from several diseases in his later years, including coronary artery disease, hypertension and hyperlipidemia (a form of high cholesterol)
NEWS
July 5, 2012 | By Patt Morrison
The Mayberry version of America was already beginning to fade into history when Andy Griffith, who died this week, began starring in "The Andy Griffith Show," as a small-town sheriff like no other. The show began a month before the election of John F. Kennedy ended the warm-fuzzies of the Eisenhower era, and it went off the air three days before Martin Luther King Jr. was assassinated. In those eight years, the country shook like Deputy Barney Fife's gun hand. The show used a man with a badge to tell its real stories, about being a good father and a good neighbor and a good citizen, in much the way that "The Twilight Zone" employed fantasy to serve up verities about the human conscience and human spirit.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 4, 2012 | Dennis McLellan
Andy Griffith was starring on Broadway in the 1959 musical comedy "Destry Rides Again" when he told his agent that he was ready for a new challenge: He wanted his own television series. His chance came in 1960, when Sheldon Leonard, the producer of "The Danny Thomas Show," developed an idea that would exploit the actor's homespun image: Griffith would play Andy Taylor, the sheriff in a series set in a mythical North Carolina town called Mayberry. "The Andy Griffith Show" made its debut that fall with Ronny Howard as the widowed sheriff's young son, Opie, and Frances Bavier as matronly Aunt Bee. The series quickly became one of the decade's most popular shows and made Griffith one of television's most beloved stars.
NATIONAL
July 4, 2012 | By Rene Lynch
With Andy Griffith's passing, America loses one of its last living links to the early days of television. "This is a big one," pop culture expert Robert J. Thompson said. "Andy Griffith was just one person. But he's symbolic of that era. With his death, the early days of television have receded into history and the stuff of museums, and directors' commentary on DVD. " To be sure, there are a few icons left who can speak about the start of traditional commercial network programming back in 1948, such as Dick Van Dyke and Sid Caesar.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 3, 2012 | By Patrick Kevin Day
Andy Griffith may no longer be with us, but his passing is providing an opportunity for cable TV to bring back some of his most beloved work. TV Land plans to air marathons of "The Andy Andy Griffith Show" on Wednesday, July 4, from 8 a.m. to 1 p.m. ET/PT and on Saturday and Sunday from 11 a.m. to 8 p.m. ET/PT. That's 46 of the 249 episodes of "The Andy Griffith Show. " Meanwhile, Me-TV plans to honor Griffith's less well known TV guest spots with episodes of"Hawaii Five-O,""Mod Squad," "Gomer Pyle" and the "Make Room For Daddy" ep that featured Griffith as a guest star.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 3, 2012 | By Chris Barton
Though best remembered for his small-screen starring roles on "The Andy Griffith Show"and "Matlock," the late Andy Griffith also enjoyed some stage time early in his career. Before he was Sheriff Andy Taylor keeping watch on Mayberry, Griffith starred as Private Will Stockdale in the 1955 Air Force comedy "No Time for Sergeants," which ran for nearly 800 performances until 1957 and also marked the Broadway debut for Griffiths' future TV costar, Don Knotts. The play was based on a novel by Mac Hyman, which was adapted for the stage by Ira Levin (who would go on to write the novel"Rosemary's Baby")
NEWS
July 5, 2012 | By Patt Morrison
The Mayberry version of America was already beginning to fade into history when Andy Griffith, who died this week, began starring in "The Andy Griffith Show," as a small-town sheriff like no other. The show began a month before the election of John F. Kennedy ended the warm-fuzzies of the Eisenhower era, and it went off the air three days before Martin Luther King Jr. was assassinated. In those eight years, the country shook like Deputy Barney Fife's gun hand. The show used a man with a badge to tell its real stories, about being a good father and a good neighbor and a good citizen, in much the way that "The Twilight Zone" employed fantasy to serve up verities about the human conscience and human spirit.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 3, 2012 | By Patrick Kevin Day
Andy Griffith, who died on Tuesday at age 86, never strayed far from his native North Carolina. He grew up there and returned there in his later years, but he's most closely identified with a place in North Carolina that never existed. "The Andy Griffith Show," which aired on CBS from 1960 to 1968, was set in the fictional town of Mayberry, N.C., and starred Griffith as Sheriff Andy Taylor. (The series was actually shot in Los Angeles.) Besides making stars of Don Knotts and young Ron Howard, the series was also a huge ratings hit and featured a distinctive theme song forever associated with Griffith.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 3, 2012 | By Steven Zeitchik
Andy Griffith made his big screen debut in 1957 as a country-boy-turned-manipulator in Elia Kazan's prescient media commentary “A Face in the Crowd.” Fifty years later, the actor, who died Tuesday at the age of 86, took on another small-town part. This time he was Old Joe, a gruff-but-good-hearted regular at a Southern diner, in the feel-good dramedy “Waitress.” Starring Keri Russell and directed by the late Adrienne Shelley, the movie was an art-house sleeper when it came out in the spring of 2007.
NATIONAL
July 3, 2012 | By Rene Lynch
Andy Griffith's death Tuesday at the age of 86 left many whistling, whether deliberately or absent-mindedly, the cheerful ditty from"The Andy Griffith Show" in honor of an actor who personified a simpler time in America. It's doubtless one of the more recognizable theme songs in all of TV history. But did you know that the infectious tune comes with equally irresistible lyrics? Don't blame us if you end up singing it all day long, but here's how the song starts: Well, now, take down your fishin' pole and meet me at the fishin' hole, We may not get a bite all day, but don't you rush away.
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