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Andy Warhol

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May 5, 1989 | SUZANNE MUCHNIC, Times Art Writer
"Somebody is printing the stuff. It can't be real money," hissed a woman struggling through the crowd at Sotheby's auction house. She wasn't talking about the multimillion-dollar prices being paid for contemporary art at this week's most exclusive auctions. Her joke was leveled at what used to be called the bottom end of the market, the "Part II" day sales of relatively low-priced works that traditionally follow splashy, big-ticket evening events. Once poorly attended and still rarely publicized beyond the auction houses' mailing lists, these sales have changed from quiet opportunities for the trade to public spectacles as the market for contemporary art has escalated.
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ENTERTAINMENT
April 24, 2014 | By David Ng
Officials at the Andy Warhol Museum in Pittsburgh have announced the recovery of long-unseen digital images that the late pop artist created on a Commodore Amiga computer in 1985. The museum announced Thursday that the images were extracted from floppy disks that Warhol had used to save the files. The images had been inaccessible for years due to the obsolete Commodore format, the museum said. In the '80s Warhol was commissioned by Commodore International to create art with the Amiga to demonstrate its graphic arts capabilities, according to the museum.
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ENTERTAINMENT
August 30, 2012 | By David Ng
If you're planning on stocking up on tomato soup in the next few weeks, you'll be able to bring home a little bit of Andy Warhol to your pantry.  Campbell's said Wednesday that a new limited-edition line of Warhol-themed condensed tomato soup cans will go on sale starting Sept. 2 at most Target stores across the country. The cans, priced at 75 cents each, are intended to celebrate the 50th anniversary of the pop artist's first paintings of the familiar soup cans. PHOTOS: Turning 50 in 2012 The soup will come in a variety of intensely colored cans meant to mimic Warhol's pop-art style.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 20, 2014 | By David Pagel
A half-century ago, Andy Warhol named his studio the Factory so that people would stop thinking of contemporary art as an esoteric enterprise pursued by lone nuts in lonely garrets, and start thinking of it as an intrinsic part of everyday life - no more mysterious, nor difficult to enjoy, than the goods served up by modern industry. For Warhol, art lost too much power when it got swaddled in sappy fantasies more appropriate to 19th century Romanticism than 20th century reality. Those saccharine fantasies get resuscitated in “Oscar Murillo: Distribution Center.” The inaugural exhibition of the Mistake Room, Murillo's first solo show in Los Angeles wraps Warhol's unsentimental vision of art's place in life in the kind of naivete that would make him cringe.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 25, 2013 | By Christopher Knight, Los Angeles Times Art Critic
For art, the 1963 murder of a president became America's Guernica. In style, emotional tenor and generation, Pablo Picasso and Andy Warhol were very different artists. But both made paintings that spoke to an epic social trauma of their day. And both used the same motif - a weeping woman - to focus the unfathomable event. Over three hours in the afternoon of April 26, 1937, German bombers pummeled an ancient Basque village in Northern Spain with a hundred thousand pounds of high-explosive and incendiary bombs, reducing the town of Guernica to smoking rubble.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 7, 1987
I chide The Times for allowing a "tribute" to the late Andy Warhol to fall into the unimaginative hands of George Will. If Will wishes to hang "Washington Crossing the Potomac" over his sofa, that's fine with me, but he does not deserve a forum to castigate an artist with imagination, humor and wit who confounded and ultimately delighted both art lovers and fans of Campbell soup. LOIS WEISS North Hollywood
ENTERTAINMENT
September 24, 2012 | By David Ng
Britain's royal family is acquiring a bit of Pop flavor in the form of screen-print portraits of Queen Elizabeth II by Andy Warhol, who once said "I want to be as famous as the Queen of England. " On Monday, the Royal Collection Trust announced that it is purchasing four Warhol portraits to mark the queen's Diamond Jubliee, the year-long celebration of her 60 years on the throne. The Royal Collection is among the art collections of the royal family. The four portraits will be displayed in the exhibition "The Queen: Portraits of a Monarch" opening  Nov. 23 at Windsor Castle in London.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 25, 2012 | By Jamie Wetherbe
The FBI is looking for 19 contemporary artworks worth millions, including a "Flowers" silkscreen by Andy Warhol, stolen last month from a collector in Detroit. The pieces were being stored temporarily at the collector's business in the city's historic Corktown neighborhood when they were stolen. Authorities didn't name the owner or the business. An FBI spokesman said the works weren't on display -- or locked up -- and the thieves have likely taken the pieces across state lines, or the U.S. border, to try to sell them.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 19, 2013 | By Victoria Kim and Corina Knoll
A 40-inch by 40-inch canvas bearing the silk-screened image of actress Farrah Fawcett, an Andy Warhol creation that became the subject of a 2 1/2-year legal battle, belongs to the star's longtime companion Ryan O'Neal, a Los Angeles jury decided Thursday. The panel sided with O'Neal over the University of Texas at Austin, the actress' alma mater, which said the painting was bequeathed to the school along with her art collection after Fawcett's death in 2009. The trial over the portrait lasted three weeks and became, in part, a scrutiny of O'Neal and Fawcett's relationship.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 16, 2013 | By Corina Knoll
In a tearful plea in front of cameras, Jaclyn Smith said Monday an Andy Warhol painting of Farrah Fawcett rightfully belonged to Ryan O'Neal. “I think the most important thing would be imagining what Farrah would want,” Smith said outside a Los Angeles courthouse. “I really feel Farrah would want that portrait with Ryan.” The actress, who said she and Fawcett were friends long before they worked together on “Charlie's Angels,” showed up to hear the closing statements of a civil trial in which the University of Austin at Texas is attempting to claim the portrait for its Blanton Museum of Art. "The love of her life was Ryan,” Smith said.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 16, 2013 | By Corina Knoll
It is a stark image of the screen star, a woman whose playful smile and cascading hair made her a style icon of the 1970s and '80s. Staring straight ahead, Farrah Fawcett's eyes are pensive, her face still. A silk screen on canvas, the Andy Warhol painting hangs above Ryan O'Neal's bed in his Malibu home. The actor has said it's his favorite place in the house, where he can hear the ocean waves and sometimes talk to the portrait of a woman who died four years ago. But a legal battle over who owns the 1980 portrait has dragged O'Neal to a downtown Los Angeles courtroom, where ownership of the painting and his relationship with Fawcett have come under the microscope.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 13, 2013 | By David Ng
A portrait of actress Farrah Fawcett created by Andy Warhol is at the center of a legal dispute that is scheduled to head to court on Wednesday. Ryan O'Neal, who had a long relationship with the late actress, is fighting the University of Texas at Austin over possession of the painting, which the university claims to own. The parties are set to square off Wednesday in Los Angeles Superior Court. At the time of her death in 2009, Fawcett bequeathed art that she owned to the University of Texas at Austin, which she attended before hitting it big in Hollywood.  The university had reportedly received one Warhol portrait of Fawcett, but O'Neal is in possession of another that is virtually identical.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 8, 2013 | By Susan King
This post has been corrected. Please see note at bottom for details. Gavin MacLeod was a fixture on television for years. From 1970 to 1977, he played sweet-natured news writer Murray Slaughter on CBS' "The Mary Tyler Moore Show. " No sooner did "MTM" close up shop than he moved over to ABC to appear as Captain Stubing on "The Love Boat," which cruised until 1986. To this day, MacLeod travels the seven seas as an ambassador for Princess Cruise Lines. The 82-year-old actor has had a diverse career: appearing on Broadway, guest-starring in countless series including "My Favorite Martian" and "Peter Gunn," and working with such directors as Blake Edwards ("Operation Petticoat")
ENTERTAINMENT
November 6, 2013 | By Kenneth Turan
For those who like to plan a bit in advance, and like something decidedly unconventional, you could do no better than a midnight to 6 a.m. event screening of Andy Warhol's celebrated five-hours-plus "Sleep" scheduled to start on the night of Nov. 16 and run through early the next morning. This rare look at what Andy Warhol saw in 1963 when he filmed John Giorno sleeping is co-sponsored by Los Angeles' Filmforum and the Human Resources gallery in Chinatown. It is being billed as "A Warhol SLEEPover" and sounds as much like a happening as a film presentation.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 25, 2013 | By Christopher Knight, Los Angeles Times Art Critic
For art, the 1963 murder of a president became America's Guernica. In style, emotional tenor and generation, Pablo Picasso and Andy Warhol were very different artists. But both made paintings that spoke to an epic social trauma of their day. And both used the same motif - a weeping woman - to focus the unfathomable event. Over three hours in the afternoon of April 26, 1937, German bombers pummeled an ancient Basque village in Northern Spain with a hundred thousand pounds of high-explosive and incendiary bombs, reducing the town of Guernica to smoking rubble.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 6, 2013 | By Jamie Wetherbe
Actor French Stewart, it seems, has double booked. The Pasadena Playhouse announced Tuesday it will postpone his show "Stoneface: The Rise and Fall and Rise of Buster Keaton" to accommodate the actor's new TV gig. Stewart is in the cast of the CBS sitcom "Mom," with Anna Faris, that premieres this fall. The playhouse will instead present the classic courtroom drama "Twelve Angry Men," which will run Nov. 5 to Dec. 1. Officials didn't give a new opening date for "Stoneface. " PHOTOS: Hollywood stars on stage “It is indeed our hope to produce 'Stoneface' at some point in the future," Playhouse artistic director Sheldon Epps said in a statement.
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