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Andy

ENTERTAINMENT
July 3, 2012 | By Patrick Kevin Day
Andy Griffith's death on Tuesday meant the most prominent cast member of the landmark "Andy Griffith Show" had finally departed. Costar Don Knotts preceded Griffith in death in 2006 and Frances Bavier (who played Aunt Bea) died in 1989. Many of Mayberry's older residents have been long gone, such as Floyd the barber (Howard McNear) in 1969 and Otis the drunk (Hal Smith) in 1994. But fans of "The Andy Griffith Show" can take heart that the streets of Mayberry haven't gone completely empty.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 21, 2004 | Larry B. Stammer, Times Staff Writer
Ever since Walt Disney began turning out feature-length animated films, scholars, theologians and journalists have plumbed the depths of the simple morality tales for deeper religious meanings and messages. Was Snow White's eating of the poison apple an allusion to the Fall in the Garden of Eden? When the puppet maker Geppetto was swallowed by a whale, was that a veiled reference to Jonah in Hebrew Scriptures? Were Jiminy Cricket's initials in "Pinocchio" a hidden reference to Jesus Christ?
ENTERTAINMENT
August 30, 1999 | BRIAN LOWRY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Home Box Office collected the most honors at Saturday's nighttime Emmy Awards presentation in Pasadena, including multiple statuettes for dramatic series "The Sopranos" and its movies "The Rat Pack" and "Winchell." Saturday's nontelevised event encompassed more than 50 categories, primarily in technical areas such as cinematography, editing and sound. An additional 27 awards, recognizing programs and performers, will be presented Sept. 12 and televised on Fox.
SPORTS
February 16, 1987 | CHRIS COBBS, Times Staff Writer
George Burns, the golfer, is easily distinguishable from George Burns, the comedian. Burns, the golfer, is the one who often wears a long face and who has a tendency to get down on himself. His idea of a good time is riding an exercise bike and lifting weights. Even on Sunday, his biggest day in golf, George Burns III seemed to fight the urge to smile broadly or say anything that might be described as amusing.
TRAVEL
March 4, 2012 | By Mary Forgione, Special to the Los Angeles Times
For those who want to spend more time than money in Las Vegas, here are 21 things to do for less than $21, all aimed at keeping the bottom line low and the fun factor high. 1. Springs Preserve. Forsake the fake pyramid and fake Statue of Liberty for a power walk through the real Vegas: 110 acres of pre-Bugsy Siegel desert. There are miles of cactus-filled trails, botanic gardens and a museum that pays tribute to the city's Mojave Desert roots. Open daily 10 a.m.-6 p.m. daily.
NEWS
April 15, 1999 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Jean Vander Pyl, the voice who brought the animated character Wilma Flintstone to life in the groundbreaking cartoon series "The Flintstones," has died. Vander Pyl, the last surviving member of the show's original cast, died Saturday at her home in Dana Point of lung cancer, said her son, Michael O'Meara. She was 79. Wilma was the harried wife of Fred Flintstone in the series which depicted the life and comic times of a family in the Stone Age town of Bedrock.
NEWS
February 17, 1990 | From Staff and Wire Reports
Keith Haring, whose distinctive, cartoon-like drawings in subway stations caught the attention of art dealers who made him famous miles away from those dank underground tunnels, died Friday of AIDS. He was 31. Haring, who was diagnosed as having AIDS more than a year ago and was active in AIDS fund-raising, fell ill with flu-like symptoms in January and died early Friday at his Manhattan home.
SPORTS
January 21, 1992 | THERESA MUNOZ
The fastest 50-meter freestyle swimmers in the world last year were Americans Matt Biondi, Tom Jager and Steve Crocker. But only two of them will advance from the Olympic trials, March 1-6 in Indianapolis, to the Olympic Games, starting July 25 in Barcelona, Spain. In response to U.S. swimming dominance, FINA, the world governing body of the sport, decreased the number of entrants allowed each country from three per event to two in 1980. Other international meets followed suit.
SPORTS
February 25, 1998 | ERIC SONDHEIMER
From the time they were old enough to chew bubble gum, Matt Fisher, Matt Cassel and Conor Jackson have been called baseball wonders. Every step of the way, from T-ball through senior league, they've stood out as all-stars. In youth drafts, they were certain No. 1 picks. If only they had agent Dennis Gilbert to negotiate their pizza deals. Time has flown by. They're now sophomores in high school, Fisher and Cassel at Chatsworth, Jackson at El Camino Real.
SPORTS
August 20, 1995 | ELLIOTT ALMOND, TIMES STAFF WRITER
With a repertoire of dives that turned and twisted like the Big Sur coastline, Mark Lenzi figured it was a simple springboard flip to lifelong happiness. Diving had come so easily. No reason everything else wouldn't as well. Lenzi had it all, didn't he? A year after tumbling his way to the three-meter springboard title in the 1992 Summer Olympics at Barcelona, Lenzi discovered the sobering answer. It was staring him in the face, reflecting from another round of drinks.
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