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Anemia

BUSINESS
July 21, 2007 | From Reuters
The U.S. Medicare health insurance program said Friday that it would reduce payments for anemia drugs when used to treat elderly and disabled patients undergoing kidney dialysis. Drugs known as erythropoiesis-stimulating agents, or ESAs, are sold by Thousand Oaks-based Amgen Inc. as Epogen and Aranesp and by Johnson & Johnson as Procrit to treat anemia.
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BUSINESS
July 19, 2000 | JAMES F. PELTZ, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A drug that treats anemia helped energize Johnson & Johnson's second-quarter earnings, which climbed 14% from a year earlier and topped forecasts, the big health-products concern said Tuesday. Led by Procrit, which treats anemia in dialysis and cancer patients, J&J said its drug sales surged 14% in the quarter ended June 30, to $3.2 billion. That included a 24% increase in domestic sales and a 1.
NEWS
January 19, 1989 | Dr. RONALD B. MACKENZIE, Dr. Ronald B. Mackenzie is a specialist in preventive and sports medicine.
Many people exercise for health and an energy-boosting payoff. But if you feel like you're running on empty, you may be suffering from sports anemia. Sports anemia is a term loosely applied to a least three different conditions: hemodilution, iron deficiency anemia and foot-strike anemia. "A sizable fraction of athletes with sports anemia aren't truly anemic," says Russell Pate, director of the Human Performance Laboratory at the University of South Carolina at Columbia.
BUSINESS
August 31, 2007 | From Bloomberg News
The largest group of U.S. cancer doctors asked Medicare to lift rules that restrict use of anemia drugs made by Amgen Inc. and Johnson & Johnson, saying the policy interferes with the treatment of patients. The American Society of Clinical Oncology, an organization with 23,000 members, said it submitted a written request Thursday that Medicare change the policy adopted last month. Another physician group, the American Society of Hematology, plans to join the challenge.
BUSINESS
April 5, 1990 | JOHN MEDEARIS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Amgen has filed an appeal to a federal court order that would have allowed both the Thousand Oaks biotechnology company and its rival, Genetics Institute, to keep rights to a lucrative anti-anemia drug without having to pay each other royalties. Industry analysts and a spokeswoman for Genetics Institute, which is based in Cambridge, Mass., said they expected Amgen's challenge, which was filed Tuesday in Federal Appeals Court in the District of Columbia.
NEWS
May 24, 1990 | ROBERT STEINBROOK, TIMES MEDICAL WRITER
A genetically engineered drug decreases the blood transfusion requirements of some AIDS patients taking the widely used AIDS drug AZT, according to a small study published in today's New England Journal of Medicine. The drug, recombinant human erythropoietin, stimulates the production of oxygen-carrying red blood cells. It is already available to AIDS patients under a U.S. Food and Drug Administration expanded-access program and may be approved for prescription sales later this year.
BUSINESS
October 23, 2007 | From Bloomberg News
The largest group of U.S. cancer doctors said Monday that Medicare has gone too far in restricting the use of anemia drugs made by Amgen Inc. and Johnson & Johnson and released its own guidelines. The doctors' recommendations add new warnings about heart risks while saying patients can safely use higher doses than Medicare allows.
BUSINESS
October 24, 2007 | Daniel Costello, Times Staff Writer
In a decisive victory, biotech giant Amgen Inc. won a jury verdict Tuesday involving a patent case that could have allowed a competitor to muscle in on its lucrative anemia drug franchise. The Thousand Oaks-based biotech's shares rose $1.58, or 2.8%, to $57.70 on the news. Swiss drug maker Roche Holding Ltd. had planned to introduce an anemia drug under the brand name Mircera as early as this year. In an uncommon legal strategy, Roche sought to show that Amgen patents were invalid.
BUSINESS
May 15, 2007 | Daniel Costello, Times Staff Writer
Medicare on Monday proposed limiting coverage of the anemia medicines that are the backbone of Amgen Inc.'s historically stellar growth, accounting for almost half of the Thousand Oaks company's sales. If Medicare follows through on its proposal, sales of the drugs, which have been slipping in recent months, would most certainly suffer. The Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services' acting administrator, Leslie Norwalk, estimated that federal reimbursements would fall by as much as 10%.
BUSINESS
April 20, 2007 | Daniel Costello, Times Staff Writer
Whose responsibility is it to ensure a product sold to millions of Americans is safe? In the drug industry, it's no simple question. Take, for example, the case of Amgen Inc. The Thousand Oaks biotech giant Thursday released the results of a highly anticipated safety study of the company's popular anemia drug Aranesp, which along with similar anemia medications is taken by more than a million people in the U.S. each year.
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