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Anemia

BUSINESS
March 15, 2007 | From Bloomberg News
Use of the anemia drugs Aranesp and Epogen, made by Thousand Oaks-based Amgen Inc., and Procrit, sold by Johnson & Johnson, will be reviewed by U.S. government health insurance programs. The study of the drugs for uses other than end-stage renal diseases was announced by the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 13, 1991 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
The addition of the organ transplant medicine cyclosporine to two established drugs increases their effectiveness in treating severe anemia, German researchers said last week. But the cyclosporine treatment, detailed in the New England Journal of Medicine, neither worked in milder cases of aplastic anemia nor extended patients' lives. Aplastic anemia is a potentially fatal disease that occurs when the bone marrow stops producing blood cells.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 15, 1996
U.S. medical researchers believe that improperly administered kidney dialysis reduces the effectiveness of a drug designed to treat anemia. The study concludes that the drug erythropoietin loses some of its ability to help the body replenish red blood cells if a clinic tries to save money by shortening the time a patient is hooked to a blood-cleansing dialysis machine. The finding, in the Feb.
BUSINESS
July 21, 2007 | From Reuters
The U.S. Medicare health insurance program said Friday that it would reduce payments for anemia drugs when used to treat elderly and disabled patients undergoing kidney dialysis. Drugs known as erythropoiesis-stimulating agents, or ESAs, are sold by Thousand Oaks-based Amgen Inc. as Epogen and Aranesp and by Johnson & Johnson as Procrit to treat anemia.
BUSINESS
July 19, 2000 | JAMES F. PELTZ, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A drug that treats anemia helped energize Johnson & Johnson's second-quarter earnings, which climbed 14% from a year earlier and topped forecasts, the big health-products concern said Tuesday. Led by Procrit, which treats anemia in dialysis and cancer patients, J&J said its drug sales surged 14% in the quarter ended June 30, to $3.2 billion. That included a 24% increase in domestic sales and a 1.
NEWS
January 19, 1989 | Dr. RONALD B. MACKENZIE, Dr. Ronald B. Mackenzie is a specialist in preventive and sports medicine.
Many people exercise for health and an energy-boosting payoff. But if you feel like you're running on empty, you may be suffering from sports anemia. Sports anemia is a term loosely applied to a least three different conditions: hemodilution, iron deficiency anemia and foot-strike anemia. "A sizable fraction of athletes with sports anemia aren't truly anemic," says Russell Pate, director of the Human Performance Laboratory at the University of South Carolina at Columbia.
BUSINESS
August 31, 2007 | From Bloomberg News
The largest group of U.S. cancer doctors asked Medicare to lift rules that restrict use of anemia drugs made by Amgen Inc. and Johnson & Johnson, saying the policy interferes with the treatment of patients. The American Society of Clinical Oncology, an organization with 23,000 members, said it submitted a written request Thursday that Medicare change the policy adopted last month. Another physician group, the American Society of Hematology, plans to join the challenge.
BUSINESS
April 5, 1990 | JOHN MEDEARIS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Amgen has filed an appeal to a federal court order that would have allowed both the Thousand Oaks biotechnology company and its rival, Genetics Institute, to keep rights to a lucrative anti-anemia drug without having to pay each other royalties. Industry analysts and a spokeswoman for Genetics Institute, which is based in Cambridge, Mass., said they expected Amgen's challenge, which was filed Tuesday in Federal Appeals Court in the District of Columbia.
NEWS
May 24, 1990 | ROBERT STEINBROOK, TIMES MEDICAL WRITER
A genetically engineered drug decreases the blood transfusion requirements of some AIDS patients taking the widely used AIDS drug AZT, according to a small study published in today's New England Journal of Medicine. The drug, recombinant human erythropoietin, stimulates the production of oxygen-carrying red blood cells. It is already available to AIDS patients under a U.S. Food and Drug Administration expanded-access program and may be approved for prescription sales later this year.
HEALTH
December 15, 2003 | Jane E. Allen
Anemia is nothing to ignore in later years. It doubles the risk of dying and boosts the risk of hospitalization by 40%, new research shows. A reduction in the number of red blood cells that fuel the body with oxygen, anemia occurs in about 13% of adults older than 70. In some cases, deficiency in iron or vitamin B-12 is to blame. Cancer, liver or kidney disease also can thwart production of red blood cells. Nearly a third of cases remain unexplained.
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