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Angel Island

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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 14, 1987
The state Park Department's plan to clear-cut the eucalyptus trees on Angel Island and then spray the stumps repeatedly with an herbicide (Part I, Oct. 30) strikes me as a red herring along the same lines as Secretary of the Interior Donald Hodel's talk about restoring Hetch Hetchy. Yes, it would be a fine and wondrous thing to see some of our scenic lands as they were before the white man disturbed them. But at the same time that the state Park Department and the Department of the Interior are holding out these Chimeras of "the way it was," are they being equally vigilant in preserving and protecting the threatened areas that can be saved by far less extravagant measures?
ARTICLES BY DATE
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 13, 2013 | By Ari Bloomekatz
It's not clear how the dog wound up in the middle of San Francisco Bay, but when windsurfers and a boating commuter stumbled upon the Labrador mix on Monday, she was cold and in need of help. "She was shivering and wet and very shy," said 52-year-old Lisa Grodin, whose husband, Adam Cohen, found the dog as he was commuting across the bay to their home in Berkeley about 6:45 p.m.  Grodin said Tuesday that her husband saw a group of windsurfers with "their sails down around this little black dot that turned out to be a dog....
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 9, 2012 | By Nita Lelyveld, Los Angeles Times
Living memory has a way of disappearing fast. Before you know it, those who were there are gone. Now 72 years after the Angel Island Immigration Station closed its doors, maybe a couple hundred people still remember firsthand what it was to travel by boat thousands of miles to California only to be held for days, weeks or months in guarded wooden barracks surrounded by San Francisco Bay. Those who do remember are getting on now. And they...
TRAVEL
July 1, 2012
Marin County piers Fort Baker Pier Overview: This 358-foot-long, l-shaped asphalt structure is homely, but nobody notices because of the staggering visuals. Background: A pier was first built here in 1937, and it has since been rehabbed several times. The Fort Baker complex is part of the Golden Gate Recreation Area, though the Army continues to have an active presence on the grounds. Notable views : From the pier's wide end, this may be the most spectacular view inside San Francisco Bay. The San Francisco skyline, Alcatraz, Angel Island and the Marin headlands are on display, albeit from a distance.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 13, 2009 | Maria L. La Ganga
At Angel Island Immigration Station, the walls really can talk. Until now, though, they haven't told the whole story of this notorious West Coast entry point in the heart of San Francisco Bay. Their first words were in Chinese, stately poems of longing and revenge carved into the wooden barracks by desperate detainees between 1910 and 1940 and discovered by accident more than a generation later. "Sadness," wrote one anonymous poet, "kills the person in the wooden building."
TRAVEL
December 1, 1991 | BEVERLY BEYER and ED RABEY and JOHN McKINNEY
For an island barely a square mile in size, Angel Island has an extremely diverse history. Over the last two centuries, the island has seen use as a pirate's supply station, a Mexican land grant, an Army artillery emplacement and an immigrant detention center. Now it's a state park, attracting hikers, history buffs and "islophiles" of all persuasions. A hundred years of U.S. military occupation began on Angel Island in 1863 when the first gun batteries were installed.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 14, 2008 | Maria L. La Ganga, Times Staff Writer
Mother Nature gave the Blue Angels a run for their money as a dramatic island wildfire in the middle of San Francisco Bay capped off the annual Fleet Week celebration here. Angel Island, an uninhabited state park and the biggest land mass in the Bay, broke out in flames Sunday night just hours after the Navy jets flew off, giving nearby residents and boaters spectacular views of flames and smoke.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 7, 2002 | DEBORAH KONG, ASSOCIATED PRESS
As their ships steamed through the Golden Gate in the early 20th century, Chinese immigrants dreamed of opportunities awaiting them on "Gold Mountain," as they called America. But instead of docking at San Francisco's fabled shores, they were shuttled onto ferries and sent to Angel Island in the middle of the bay. At the immigration station there, dreams of paradise quickly clashed with reality.
NEWS
July 21, 1996 | MARY CURTIUS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
For years, this largest of the San Francisco Bay islands, lying northeast of the Golden Gate Bridge, has offered a tree-shaded escape to thousands of city dwellers who hike or bicycle along its quiet paths. Not so this summer.
TRAVEL
November 18, 2007 | Hugo Martin, Times Staff Writer
The views were mesmerizing: A shroud of fog enveloped the Golden Gate Bridge. Waves washed onto the Berkeley shores. A sailboat tacked its way under the Bay Bridge. But I had little time to sit and absorb the scenery from Angel Island State Park. If I didn't pick up the pace, I would be stranded on this largely undeveloped island in the middle of San Francisco Bay without food or shelter until the next morning.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 30, 2012 | By Esmeralda Bermudez and Hector Becerra, Los Angeles Times
Eric T. Fresch, the former top Vernon official whose tenure became a lightning rod in last year's effort to disincorporate the small industrial city, was found dead at a state park in the Bay Area, officials said Friday. The body of Fresch, 58, was discovered by rangers Thursday evening at Angel Island State Park, which is located in San Francisco Bay not far from Fresch's home in Tiburon. Tiburon Battalion Chief Ed Lynch said Fresch had been cycling around the island with his wife before they got separated.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 9, 2012 | By Nita Lelyveld, Los Angeles Times
Living memory has a way of disappearing fast. Before you know it, those who were there are gone. Now 72 years after the Angel Island Immigration Station closed its doors, maybe a couple hundred people still remember firsthand what it was to travel by boat thousands of miles to California only to be held for days, weeks or months in guarded wooden barracks surrounded by San Francisco Bay. Those who do remember are getting on now. And they...
OPINION
January 21, 2010 | By Erika Lee and Judy Yung
One hundred years ago today, the Angel Island Immigration Station in San Francisco Bay opened its doors. From 1910 to 1940, the "Ellis Island of the West" was the gateway into America for more than half a million immigrants from 80 countries, all seeking the opportunity, freedom and fortune of the American dream. Among them was a Chinese immigrant who carved the following poem into the barrack walls while detained on Angel Island: I clasped my hands in parting with my brothers and classmates.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 13, 2009 | Maria L. La Ganga
At Angel Island Immigration Station, the walls really can talk. Until now, though, they haven't told the whole story of this notorious West Coast entry point in the heart of San Francisco Bay. Their first words were in Chinese, stately poems of longing and revenge carved into the wooden barracks by desperate detainees between 1910 and 1940 and discovered by accident more than a generation later. "Sadness," wrote one anonymous poet, "kills the person in the wooden building."
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 14, 2008 | Maria L. La Ganga, Times Staff Writer
Mother Nature gave the Blue Angels a run for their money as a dramatic island wildfire in the middle of San Francisco Bay capped off the annual Fleet Week celebration here. Angel Island, an uninhabited state park and the biggest land mass in the Bay, broke out in flames Sunday night just hours after the Navy jets flew off, giving nearby residents and boaters spectacular views of flames and smoke.
TRAVEL
November 18, 2007 | Hugo Martin, Times Staff Writer
The views were mesmerizing: A shroud of fog enveloped the Golden Gate Bridge. Waves washed onto the Berkeley shores. A sailboat tacked its way under the Bay Bridge. But I had little time to sit and absorb the scenery from Angel Island State Park. If I didn't pick up the pace, I would be stranded on this largely undeveloped island in the middle of San Francisco Bay without food or shelter until the next morning.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 8, 1997 | JEAN H. LEE, ASSOCIATED PRESS
Dale Ching walks to the spot where he slept in a bunk for 3 1/2 months in 1937, a prisoner of U.S. immigration laws. He wraps his hand around the pole that held his bed and tells how the joy he felt on landing in San Francisco turned into despair as he spent night after night on the narrow bunk. "I thought, 'In a couple of days, I'll be with my dad,' " he recalls. "But they wouldn't let us even see each other."
TRAVEL
June 8, 2003 | Rosemary McClure, Times Staff Writer
Lunch was modest: a turkey sandwich on wheat. But the view was first class. "Drop-dead gorgeous" was the way a fellow hiker described the panorama below as we picnicked on a hillside. To the left was the Bay Bridge; in front was San Francisco's skyline; to the right were the Golden Gate Bridge and the Marin County towns of Sausalito, Belvedere and Tiburon. Sailboats glided with the wind on a sunny Saturday morning. We were at Angel Island State Park, a hilly retreat in San Francisco Bay.
TRAVEL
June 17, 2007 | Rosemary McClure, Times Staff Writer
Go island hopping in San Francisco Bay on a getaway package that includes lodging, food and ferry rides. The deal: The Angel Island package, with a starting rate of $169 per night, double occupancy, includes overnight accommodations at the Lodge at Tiburon, breakfast, parking, round-trip ferry tickets to Angel Island State Park, all-day bike rentals and lunch. The island: Angel Island, hilly and tree-covered, is the largest island in San Francisco Bay.
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