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Angel Raich

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November 14, 2004 | Carol Mithers, Carol Mithers last wrote for the magazine on farmworker Salvador Ferreira.
Angel Raich flicks a butane lighter at the bowl of a small glass pipe, inhales deeply, then, in deference to a guest, blows the pungent smoke out the window of the sitting room in her three-story Oakland home. "Without cannabis, I would not survive," she says. The room is pale blue and filled with ceramic angels. Beside the lavender couch on which Raich sits, a table holds 11 small glass jars of medical-quality marijuana--strains that growers have named Juicy Fruit and Haze.
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OPINION
March 19, 2007
Re "Patient loses appeal on medical marijuana," March 15 I was sickened to hear of the appeals court ruling that refuses to reconsider our draconian drug laws even to save the life of a suffering woman. There is something wrong with a government that would rather spend billions of dollars keeping marijuana illegal and wasting countless law enforcement hours hunting down the ill and the dying, instead of simply acknowledging that marijuana is a useful medicinal herb (and even as a recreational drug is no more dangerous than alcohol)
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OPINION
March 19, 2007
Re "Patient loses appeal on medical marijuana," March 15 I was sickened to hear of the appeals court ruling that refuses to reconsider our draconian drug laws even to save the life of a suffering woman. There is something wrong with a government that would rather spend billions of dollars keeping marijuana illegal and wasting countless law enforcement hours hunting down the ill and the dying, instead of simply acknowledging that marijuana is a useful medicinal herb (and even as a recreational drug is no more dangerous than alcohol)
MAGAZINE
November 14, 2004 | Carol Mithers, Carol Mithers last wrote for the magazine on farmworker Salvador Ferreira.
Angel Raich flicks a butane lighter at the bowl of a small glass pipe, inhales deeply, then, in deference to a guest, blows the pungent smoke out the window of the sitting room in her three-story Oakland home. "Without cannabis, I would not survive," she says. The room is pale blue and filled with ceramic angels. Beside the lavender couch on which Raich sits, a table holds 11 small glass jars of medical-quality marijuana--strains that growers have named Juicy Fruit and Haze.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 11, 2007 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
The medical marijuana patient who took her case to the U.S. Supreme Court announced Thursday that she is dropping further legal appeals. Angel Raich, 41, a mother of two from Oakland who smokes cannabis for a variety of ills, including a brain tumor, said the battle should now move from the courts to Congress. "I'm not a quitter, so this was a hard decision. But I've lost all faith in the judicial system," said Raich, who was never arrested for her medical pot use but sought to bar the U.S.
MAGAZINE
December 5, 2004
The U.S. Supreme Court case Ashcroft vs. Raich is an important one in the effort to help America's young people understand that smoked marijuana is not medicine ("The Plaintiff," by Carol Mithers, Nov. 14). Although the drug legalizers have successfully convinced a vast number of Americans that marijuana is good, parents and grandparents who have watched their children fall prey to this myth will tell you otherwise. There are currently 182,000 young people in treatment for marijuana-related problems.
OPINION
November 30, 2004
Of the various fronts in the nation's "war on drugs," none seems more perverse and pointless than the raids that Atty. Gen. John Ashcroft pressed Drug Enforcement Administration agents to stage against patients treating themselves with medical marijuana under Proposition 215, a law that California voters passed eight years ago.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 19, 2004 | Eric Bailey, Times Staff Writer
A pair of medical marijuana patients won legal protection Tuesday against arrest and federal prosecution, setting the stage for a U.S. Supreme Court showdown to determine whether states can allow cannabis to be used as medicine. U.S. District Judge Martin Jenkins in San Francisco issued a preliminary injunction against the U.S.
OPINION
April 29, 2005
When San Francisco's Board of Supervisors met Monday to discuss how to tighten oversight of the city's 43 medical marijuana dispensaries, Bush administration officials cheered, for all the wrong reasons. Drug Enforcement Administration agents should have been thrilled that the city is trying to fill the regulatory gulf created in 1996 when Californians passed Proposition 215, vaguely sanctioning marijuana for "any ... illness for which marijuana provides relief."
NATIONAL
June 29, 2004 | David G. Savage, Times Staff Writer
The Supreme Court announced Monday that it would hear the Bush administration's claim that federal drug agents have the authority to arrest seriously ill Californians who use homegrown marijuana to relieve their pain. The court agreed to hear an appeal filed by Atty. Gen. John Ashcroft, who contends that federal law prohibits the use of marijuana "in all instances."
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 12, 2004 | Eric Bailey, Times Staff Writer
A visit Wednesday to the California capital by President Bush's drug czar prompted a placard-waving protest by medical marijuana supporters angry over the federal government's opposition to use of the drug by the ill. The demonstration by about a dozen activists came as John Walters, director of the president's Office of National Drug Control Policy, met in a downtown office building with members of law enforcement and leaders of the drug treatment effort to discuss the U.S.
OPINION
June 9, 2005
Re "Justices Rule U.S. Can Ban Medical Pot," June 7: Is that why they call it the high court? Daniel Waldman Santa Barbara One perverse result of the medical marijuana case: In eviscerating any meaningful check on Congress' power to intrude on the most noncommercial and private of individual activities under the guise of "regulating interstate commerce," the court undermines the avowed principal goal of the federal drug control legislation...
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