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OPINION
July 6, 2013
When Antonio Villaraigosa took over as mayor of Los Angeles in 2005, The Times published at least five letters to the editor - and received many more submissions than that - on the historic moment. L.A. had elected its second Latino mayor ever, and he was promising big things. Not surprisingly, readers had much to say. And for new Mayor Eric Garcetti's first week? Regular readers have probably noticed that only one letter on Garcetti - Friday's lead piece imploring the mayor to focus on affordable housing in Los Angeles - has been published since his inauguration Sunday.
ARTICLES BY DATE
OPINION
April 24, 2014 | By Harold Meyerson
The most fundamental problem Los Angeles faces is that a huge number of Angelenos can't even afford to live here. Their pay is too low; their rent is too high. Last week, the real estate website Zillow released a survey commissioned by the New York Times that identified the 90 American cities where the median rent exceeded 30% of the median household income. (The 30% figure is the threshold at which rent is generally deemed unaffordable.) The survey ranked those 90 cities by the percentage of their residents' median income devoted to their median rent.
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BUSINESS
November 22, 2013 | By Tiffany Hsu
Los Angeles residents will outspend fellow Americans this holiday season, shelling out $428 on average for gifts compared with the $421 national average, according to a report from Deloitte. The consulting firm surveyed 5,018 consumers nationally, with 506 of them from Los Angeles. The amount is a slight drop from last year, when Angelenos on average said they would spend $430 buying presents. This time around, however, they'll lavish their funds on gift cards, making it the most popular holiday item, outpacing clothing.
OPINION
April 19, 2014
Fancy this: In a city known for its car culture, Angelenos care deeply about their sidewalks. Every time the issue of fixing L.A.'s thousands of miles of neglected walkways gets tackled in the opinion or news pages, at least a dozen readers (not a huge amount, but more than on the average topic) fume about their experiences negotiating sidewalks buckled by massive tree roots or just wear and tear. In response to an editorial  and a news article this week on the city sitting on a $10-million fund for sidewalk repair, 22 readers wrote letters imploring L.A. to take action or offering their advice for improving the walking experience here.
NEWS
June 16, 2011 | By Jeannine Stein, Los Angeles Times / For the Booster Shots blog
Cue the Barry White music: Angelenos are having sex more often than other poor slobs around the country, according to the Trojan U.S. Sex Census. Awwwwwwwwwwwwww yeah. We're acknowledging right up front that maybe the national 1,000-person survey sponsored by Trojan isn't the most scientific investigation on sex in the history of mankind, but what the heck, L.A. is No. 1! Well, sort of. According to the survey, the average 18-and-older American has sex 120 times per year, but Angelenos are doing it 135 times a year.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 27, 2011 | Hector Tobar
I know a guy who's an actor on a cable TV show. Our kids attend the same school and sometimes our paths cross at track meets and other events. He can slip by unbothered in public for a long while — until someone steps forward and violates an unwritten code of L.A. life by shouting out the name of the character he plays. Suddenly a kind of feeding frenzy begins. The poor man is surrounded by autograph seekers, and cameras are pointed in his direction. Seeing this, I shake my head and think: A real Angeleno would never do that.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 4, 2014 | Steve Lopez
I learned two things when Deborah Murphy of Silver Lake sent me an email in mid-December. First, there's a pedestrian-advocacy organization in our car-crazed metropolis, and it goes by the name of Los Angeles Walks. Second, there's a city of L.A. Pedestrian Advocacy Committee. Murphy is executive director of the former, chair of the latter, and she wanted to know if I could meet with her to discuss a development she's not happy about. Namely, there's the possibility of a $3-billion street repair bond measure on the November ballot this year, but as currently conceived, it would fix only the worst of L.A.'s streets and do nothing for the city's abominable sidewalks.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 3, 2011 | Hector Tobar
Los Angeles people feel their city is misunderstood. They know that most outsiders, and even many locals, have only the most superficial understanding of it. This doesn't crush them — because being from L.A. means being a little low-key about hometown pride. But deep down, real Angelenos do enjoy hearing how special this city is, and how right they are to stay here, even in these not-great times. That's the feeling I got after I wrote a column last week listing some of my "real Angeleno" criteria and asking you to add to them.
NEWS
February 4, 2014 | By Matthew Fleischer, guest blogger, This post has been updated, as indicated below.
The recent spritz of rain notwithstanding, California is in the midst of what Gov. Jerry Brown called “perhaps the worst drought [the state] has ever seen.” And yet, despite the desperate state of affairs, every day the city of Los Angeles flushes hundreds of millions of gallons of potentially potable water out to sea. I'm talking about treated sewage. In 2000, Los Angeles actually completed a sewage reclamation plant capable of providing water to 120,000 homes - the Donald C. Tillman Water Reclamation Plant in Van Nuys.
OPINION
December 27, 2009 | By Patt Morrison
What was the biggest thing to happen in L.A. this year? I'll bet you a Manny Ramirez bobblehead that you thought of those busted water mains spraying up through the streets, making like an urban Yellowstone. They looked spectacular on TV and they confirmed every snarky stereotype of government shortcomings. The Lakers' championship -- what, again? That's so old hat that the city balked over paying to police a victory parade for pro basketball's richest franchise. Michael Jackson's memorial service?
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 6, 2014 | By Robert Faturechi
There was not a car in sight along a six-mile stretch of Wilshire Boulevard on Sunday as thousands of Angelenos took over the city's unofficial Main Street to celebrate the ever-popular CicLAvia festival. The usually congested thoroughfare was filled with cyclists, joggers, rollerbladers and at least one unicyclist. One man rolled down the route, a leash in each hand, with two poodle mixes trailing behind. Nathan Freeman, 55, said he rides the route weekly but preferred Sunday's car-free event because it allowed him to enjoy "without worrying about getting hit by vehicles.
TRAVEL
April 5, 2014
For local trips, try Metrolink, which offers a $10 weekend day pass [Saturday or Sunday]. Angelenos might enjoy the antiques stores in Orange and the pier in San Clemente. There is more to see in San Juan Capistrano than the mission. In Riverside, the Mission Inn is definitely worth seeing. Metrolink, http://www.metrolinktrains.com . Susan Ostrowsky Corona del Mar
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 23, 2014 | By Anh Do
Light rain is expected in the Los Angeles area by midweek, forecasters said. There's a 40% to 50% chance of light showers by Wednesday night, said David Sweet, a meteorologist with the National Weather Service. Even if it's just a quarter of an inch, "every bit helps," he said. Angelenos will experience mostly sunny weather through Tuesday, with highs in the mid-60s through mid-70s. But temperatures could drop slightly by Wednesday as a low-pressure system rolls through Los Angeles, bringing with it at least a sprinkle of rain, said Bill Patzert, a climatologist for the Jet Propulsion Laboratory in La Canada Flintridge.  "There will be just enough so we can play bumper tag on the freeway, moving around the dust on our car," Patzert said.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 11, 2014 | Steve Lopez
Dr. David Rizzo's love affair with Los Angeles was rock solid for decades. The first sign of trouble came last year, when the house-call foot doctor finally grew tired of logging so many hours in his car and decided to break off the relationship. Rizzo, 62, thought he was ready for semi-retirement, and he loves infernal heat. So he moved to Phoenix. In August. "The sky at night is a celestial event," Rizzo said of his new metropolitan mistress. But the sun kept coming up, shining brightly on a man who cast a long, lonely shadow in the Arizona desert.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 10, 2014 | Sandy Banks
I feel out of the cultural loop these days, as I try to follow the news. I can't wrap my mind around bitcoins and I'm not sure what an e-cig is. Pretend cigarettes? Virtual money? It's all too tech-centric for me. If you're also confused about the bitcoin system, here's how Wikipedia explains it: "Bitcoin is a peer-to-peer payment system and digital currency introduced as open source software in 2009.... It is a cryptocurrency, so-called because it uses cryptography to control the creation and transfer of money.
TRAVEL
March 8, 2014
A direct drive from politically blue Southern California to blue New York takes you through red Kansas and the curiously named town of Liberal. Don't miss it. Tour Dorothy's House & Land of Oz, a theme village, and the Mid-America Air Museum (including a tiny Air Force One that President Eisenhower piloted between Camp David and Washington, D.C.). Relax at Taste of China, where the $8.95 buffet would impress Angelenos and New Yorkers alike. Liberal Convention & Visitors Bureau, 1 Yellow Brick Road; (800)
TRAVEL
April 5, 2014
For local trips, try Metrolink, which offers a $10 weekend day pass [Saturday or Sunday]. Angelenos might enjoy the antiques stores in Orange and the pier in San Clemente. There is more to see in San Juan Capistrano than the mission. In Riverside, the Mission Inn is definitely worth seeing. Metrolink, http://www.metrolinktrains.com . Susan Ostrowsky Corona del Mar
ENTERTAINMENT
July 22, 2013 | By Dana Ferguson
Fifteen years ago former Pfc. and military police officer Jerry Whiteside had two masks tattooed on his left bicep, one smiling, one frowning. Inspired by the woman he was dating, an interest in theater and an assortment of substances in his system, Whiteside felt the tattoo was the logical step. "I read from Shakespeare, and I always had the dream of being in theater," Whiteside said. "I wear a comedy and tragedy tattoo on my arm, and most people will call it 'Smile now, cry later,' and I tell them, 'No, that's not what it stands for.'" Little did he know that more than a decade later, he would be symbolically reunited with the images imprinted on his skin.
OPINION
March 6, 2014 | Meghan Daum
Alec Baldwin, celebrated actor, self-congratulatory philanthropist and incurable hothead, is moving to Los Angeles. At least he's leaning heavily in that direction, according to a protracted rant he published in last week's issue of New York Magazine. Baldwin covered a lot of territory, from family troubles to his doomed MSNBC talk show to the indignity of having to share a Broadway stage with Shia LaBeouf. Mostly, though, he circled around his disgust for the media and, by extension, his disgust for New York City.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 27, 2014 | By David Zahniser
A Los Angeles citizen commission launched a three-month effort Thursday to find ways of improving voter turnout in the city, where fewer than 1 out of 4 voters has been casting ballots in recent municipal elections. The nine-member Municipal Elections Reform Commission has been asked to come up with a series of recommendations by mid-May, a schedule that is designed to give the City Council enough time to put proposals on the November election ballot. Turnout in last May's election -- which included contests for mayor, city attorney, city controller and a handful of City Council and school board seats -- was 23.3%.
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