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Angeles Crest 100 Mile Endurance Run

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NEWS
September 13, 2005 | Roy M. Wallack
TWO decades ago, Ken Hamada started the Angeles Crest 100-Mile Endurance Run to save a few marriages. "Back then, the only 100-mile run in California was the Western States 100, and some of my running pals -- mainly CHP officers -- would leave their families for days and weeks at a time to go up to the Sierra and train," says the aeronautical engineer and two-time Western States finisher from Arcadia. "Cops are intense people. Ultrarunning is addictive.
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NEWS
September 13, 2005 | Roy M. Wallack
TWO decades ago, Ken Hamada started the Angeles Crest 100-Mile Endurance Run to save a few marriages. "Back then, the only 100-mile run in California was the Western States 100, and some of my running pals -- mainly CHP officers -- would leave their families for days and weeks at a time to go up to the Sierra and train," says the aeronautical engineer and two-time Western States finisher from Arcadia. "Cops are intense people. Ultrarunning is addictive.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 30, 1991 | BERKLEY HUDSON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
With 75 miles behind him and 25 more to go, Jack Slater moved like a mountain goat along a dark and narrow trail in the Angeles National Forest. "I could just drop right here, if I weren't on some sort of a quest," the 44-year-old Pasadena resident said, breaking the rhythm of his measured breathing as sweat beaded on his gray-bearded face. "I got whole mountains to go over now."
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 30, 1996 | SONIA NAZARIO, TIMES STAFF WRITER
It was a first for the grueling Angeles Crest 100-Mile Endurance Run: a third straight win for an Encinitas physical education teacher--and at best, a disappointing fourth place showing for one of the Tarahumara Indians from Northern Mexico who were running the race to call attention to their tribe's plight. Ben Hian, 27, finished in just over 18 hours and 50 minutes. Jennifer Henderson, 37, led the women, with a time of 24 hours and 26 minutes.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 30, 1996 | SONIA NAZARIO, TIMES STAFF WRITER
It was a first for the grueling Angeles Crest 100-Mile Endurance Run: a third straight win for an Encinitas physical education teacher--and at best, a disappointing fourth place showing for one of the Tarahumara Indians from Northern Mexico who were running the race to call attention to their tribe's plight. Ben Hian, 27, finished in just over 18 hours and 50 minutes. Jennifer Henderson, 37, led the women, with a time of 24 hours and 26 minutes.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 2, 1991
One of the top women runners in the Angeles Crest 100-mile Endurance Run remained in fair condition Tuesday at St. Luke Medical Center in Pasadena, where she was admitted Sunday after suffering from extreme nausea, dehydration and acute kidney problems. Martha Cederstrom, 35, of San Rafael dropped out of the race in the San Gabriel Mountains early Sunday after running 82 miles in about 20 hours in the race from Wrightwood to the Rose Bowl in Pasadena.
NEWS
September 17, 1987
Jim Gensichen, 38, a Canoga Park construction supervisor, won the second annual Angeles Crest 100-Mile Endurance Run that began Saturday in Wrightwood and ended Sunday in Pasadena's Rose Bowl. Gensichen completed the race in 19 hours and 37 minutes, an hour better than last year's winner. Placing second and third were Jim Pellon, 35, a structural engineer from Westlake Village, and Jim O'Brien, 33, of Monrovia, track coach at Caltech.
NEWS
September 26, 1991 | BERKLEY HUDSON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A decade ago, not too long after Ken Hamada rapidly advanced from being a jogger with a wheezing smoker's cough to a lean and fit marathoner, he ran in his first race of 100 miles. With that one experience, at Squaw Valley in the Sierra Nevada Mountains, Hamada became a confirmed runner of perhaps the longest, most grueling type of race on earth. But soon the aerospace engineer from Arcadia faced an obstacle more problematic than even the running itself.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 29, 1997 | ESTHER SCHRADER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In their native Mexico, Tarahumara Indians are treated as nothings--looked down on by many of their countrymen despite their fame as legendary long-distance runners--and are left in a struggle to endure. But in Orange County, four sisters raised in Mexico have turned the tables on the prejudices they grew up with, raising more than $10,000 since September to help the destitute Indians. Their compassion, they said, comes from moving to the United States and learning how discrimination feels.
NEWS
March 31, 2004 | Kathleen Doheny, Special to The Times
AFTER flying from Los Angeles to Sydney, Australia, Adam Hancock was tossing and turning in his hotel bed. "I woke up at 3 a.m., Sydney time," said Hancock, the director of film distribution for Buena Vista International in Burbank. His solution: Go for a run. Some business travelers would have popped a sleeping pill and hoped for the best. But Hancock, a lifelong runner who logs 15 to 20 miles a week, decided it was a good time to squeeze in a workout.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 30, 1991 | BERKLEY HUDSON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
With 75 miles behind him and 25 more to go, Jack Slater moved like a mountain goat along a dark and narrow trail in the Angeles National Forest. "I could just drop right here, if I weren't on some sort of a quest," the 44-year-old Pasadena resident said, breaking the rhythm of his measured breathing as sweat beaded on his gray-bearded face. "I got whole mountains to go over now."
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 20, 2004 | Richard Fausset, Times Staff Writer
Steve Patt lumbered out of the San Gabriel Mountains in a pair of mud-caked athletic shoes Sunday to accomplish one of the most daunting feats in sports: the completion of a 100-mile trail race. Yet there were no TV cameras or pompoms to greet him as he crossed the finish line of the Angeles Crest 100 Mile Endurance Run in Pasadena. Only a smattering of applause from a laid-back crowd, a handshake from a race official and the promise of a commemorative belt buckle awaited him.
NEWS
September 25, 1996 | GEORGE RAMOS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
For six Tarahumara Indians, members of a tribe of legendary long-distance runners from northern Mexico, Saturday's 100-mile endurance race in the Angeles National Forest isn't just another race. It's a run to survive. "There's very little food, there's very little water," Tarahumara runner Madero Herrera says of his tribe's predicament back home. "There's no electricity in our community. People are hungry. People are dying."
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