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Angels Flight

CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 20, 2001 | PATRICK McGREEVY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The Los Angeles City Council on Wednesday approved the city's part of a proposed $3-million settlement with the family of a Holocaust survivor who was killed in the Angels Flight funicular accident Feb. 1. The council voted unanimously to authorize the city Community Redevelopment Agency to pay $1 million to settle a lawsuit alleging the wrongful death of Leon Praport, 83, and the serious injury of his wife, Lola, 81.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 24, 2001 | KENNETH REICH, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Nearly 10 months after the Angels Flight funicular railway cars crashed downtown, killing one person and injuring seven, plans to reopen the attraction are still in limbo. The necessary safety improvements have not even been officially identified. Railway officials say nothing can be done beyond repairing the two badly damaged cars--work that has already begun in an Eastside warehouse--until the National Transportation Safety Board reports on the cause of the Feb. 1 accident.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 7, 2001 | JILL LEOVY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
It's not quite the Angels Flight of old, but a trolley service begun by Los Angeles this week takes pedestrians to similar heights. The new Bunker Hill Trolley is a small bus with wooden seats and a bell on the front. It looks a little like the historic Angels Flight funicular, which has not operated since a Feb. 1 accident in which one man died.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 25, 2001 | KENNETH REICH, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A two-day settlement conference has been scheduled to begin July 20 in a lawsuit filed over a death and serious injury in the Feb. 1 Angels Flight funicular accident, according to attorneys for both sides. Representatives of the Los Angeles Community Redevelopment Agency, the Angels Flight Railway Foundation and operating company and Pueblo Contracting Services have agreed to go before an Alternative Dispute Resolution mediator, along with representatives of the Leon and Lola Praport family.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 4, 2001
I sympathize with the plight of the persons described in "No Angels Flight--Just 153 Steep, Tiring Stairs" (March 29), as I have been in the same situation. There is an alternate route for getting to California Plaza. Walk a half-block to Fourth Street, then trudge up the hill (it's a very steep grade) to Olive Street. In the meantime, pray that the light at the top of the hill turns red, allowing you a chance to catch your breath. Cross Olive Street and take the escalator to the upper level.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 29, 2001 | JILL LEOVY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
They huff, they puff, they trudge, they rest. They blow out big cheekfuls of air and lean back, gazing at the summit. You can almost hear them thinking, how much more? Since a deadly Feb. 1 crash halted operation of downtown's Angels Flight railway, a stream of people can be seen on any given weekday, attacking the 153 steps between Hill Street and California Plaza, the only remaining route up that stretch of the steep hill the funicular used to climb.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 27, 2001
The family of Holocaust survivor Leon Praport, who died last month in the crash of the Angels Flight funicular, filed a wide-ranging lawsuit Monday alleging that the city of Los Angeles allowed a "dangerous condition" to exist on public property, creating a "substantial risk of injury" when the downtown railway was in operation. Praport, 83, was killed and his wife, Lola, was one of seven injured when a mechanical failure caused the railway's two cars to collide.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 16, 2001 | KENNETH REICH, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The family of Leon Praport, an 83-year-old Holocaust survivor who died last month in the Angels Flight crash, will file a lawsuit against the city and private firms involved in restoring and operating the historic funicular, an attorney announced Thursday. Lawyer Gary A. Dordick said the suit, also being filed on behalf of Praport's wife, Lola, who survived the Feb. 1 crash, will seek a judgment compelling the city to restore Angels Flight to full service with new, safe equipment.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 5, 2001
It looks like all the parties involved in the remodeled Angels Flight project had their good reasons ("Funicular Car Design Had Called for Brakes," March 1). Parsons Brinckerhoff Quade & Douglas Inc. had good reason to specify an emergency brake system in its design for the new Angels Flight; it made good sense. To Parsons Brinckerhoff's credit as prudent engineers, they never backed down from their emergency brake recommendations. The bankrupt lift-mechanism supplier had a good reason; he couldn't figure out how to build a brake system.
NEWS
March 1, 2001 | PATRICK McGREEVY and KENNETH REICH, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
Despite their private engineers' warnings that track brakes were necessary on the Angels Flight cable cars, city redevelopment officials allowed the builders to alter the design in 1995 to eliminate those brakes and other safety features from the funicular system, city records show.
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