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NEWS
December 14, 1990 | From Associated Press
Representatives of the two warring factions in Angola met Thursday with three outside mediators, and a joint statement issued afterward reported "significant progress" toward a cease-fire in the country's civil war. Joining the Angolans at the talks were officials from the United States, the Soviet Union and Portugal, the former colonial power in Angola and site of the five rounds of peace talks held thus far this year.
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NEWS
January 24, 1999 | Associated Press
The UNITA rebels announced Saturday that they are ending relations with the Portuguese government because the former colonial power blamed the group for the renewed war in this African nation. Portugal's foreign minister, Jaime Gama, has blamed UNITA for the return last month to civil war after four years of fragile peace under a U.N.-brokered peace deal. The rebels and the government of Jose Eduardo dos Santos have been fighting since Portugal granted Angola its independence in 1975.
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NEWS
November 30, 1987
Joao Soares, son of Portuguese President Mario Soares, flew to Angola in an attempt to speed the release of two Swedish aid workers kidnaped by rebels opposing the African nation's Marxist government. Soares, a leading Socialist in his own country, has had previous contacts with the rebel National Union for the Total Independence of Angola, which has fought the Angolan government since the country gained its independence from Portugal 12 years ago.
NEWS
December 14, 1990 | From Associated Press
Representatives of the two warring factions in Angola met Thursday with three outside mediators, and a joint statement issued afterward reported "significant progress" toward a cease-fire in the country's civil war. Joining the Angolans at the talks were officials from the United States, the Soviet Union and Portugal, the former colonial power in Angola and site of the five rounds of peace talks held thus far this year.
NEWS
January 24, 1999 | Associated Press
The UNITA rebels announced Saturday that they are ending relations with the Portuguese government because the former colonial power blamed the group for the renewed war in this African nation. Portugal's foreign minister, Jaime Gama, has blamed UNITA for the return last month to civil war after four years of fragile peace under a U.N.-brokered peace deal. The rebels and the government of Jose Eduardo dos Santos have been fighting since Portugal granted Angola its independence in 1975.
NEWS
July 19, 1987 | MICHAEL PARKS, Times Staff Writer
The garbage-strewn, potholed streets, the boarded-up stores, the half-finished buildings, the rusting carcasses of old trucks and buses--the decay of Angola has become legendary. One of Africa's most fertile countries, Angola now grows less than half the food it needs for its 8.7 million people. Nearly a fifth of its people are either refugees or destitute, according to government figures, and an estimated 45% are malnourished.
NEWS
November 30, 1987
Joao Soares, son of Portuguese President Mario Soares, flew to Angola in an attempt to speed the release of two Swedish aid workers kidnaped by rebels opposing the African nation's Marxist government. Soares, a leading Socialist in his own country, has had previous contacts with the rebel National Union for the Total Independence of Angola, which has fought the Angolan government since the country gained its independence from Portugal 12 years ago.
NEWS
July 19, 1987 | MICHAEL PARKS, Times Staff Writer
The garbage-strewn, potholed streets, the boarded-up stores, the half-finished buildings, the rusting carcasses of old trucks and buses--the decay of Angola has become legendary. One of Africa's most fertile countries, Angola now grows less than half the food it needs for its 8.7 million people. Nearly a fifth of its people are either refugees or destitute, according to government figures, and an estimated 45% are malnourished.
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