Advertisement
YOU ARE HERE: LAT HomeCollectionsAngola Revolts
IN THE NEWS

Angola Revolts

FEATURED ARTICLES
NEWS
July 20, 2000 | From Times Wire Services
The international diamond industry announced strict new measures Wednesday to clamp down on the trade in "conflict diamonds" used to pay for wars in Africa. The measures include a certification system to closely track rough diamonds from the time they're mined, as well as tough penalties for dealers who break U.N. embargoes on diamond sales by rebels in Angola and Sierra Leone.
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
April 5, 2002 | DAVAN MAHARAJ, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The Angolan government and the UNITA rebel group signed a formal cease-fire agreement Thursday, in what was heralded as the best hope yet for peace in a country that has been racked by civil war for more than a quarter of a century. White flags fluttered outside the parliament building in Luanda, the Angolan capital, as leaders of the army and UNITA shook hands and exchanged hugs after signing the accord.
Advertisement
NEWS
February 4, 1996 | BOB DROGIN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Past bombed-out buildings and burned-out cars, near grim skull-and-crossbones signs for a roadside minefield, a dusty cluster of military tents here holds the hopes for lasting peace in Africa's longest civil war. But Angola has dashed such hopes before. And despite a shaky 14 1/2-month cease-fire after two decades of death and devastation, it may be doing it again.
NEWS
February 25, 2002 | From Times Wire Services
Rebels vowed Sunday to continue their longtime struggle in Angola despite the death of their founder and leader, Jonas Savimbi, but said the government could open a path to peace by declaring a cease-fire. Savimbi, 67, was confirmed dead by his National Union for the Total Independence of Angola, or UNITA, late Saturday after television networks showed his bullet-riddled body. He was killed by government troops.
NEWS
June 16, 1987 | Associated Press
The Cuban general who defected to the United States last month has told U.S. officials that 10,000 Cuban troops have been killed in Angola since 1976, according to senior Administration officials. The estimate by Brig. Gen. Rafael del Pino Diaz is the first authoritative figure the United States has received on Cuban casualties in Angola, but the officials said it was roughly the same as American calculations.
NEWS
May 7, 1995 | Associated Press
Angola's two most powerful leaders ended their first meeting in four years Saturday by embracing and pledging to work together to end 20 years of civil war. President Jose Eduardo dos Santos and rebel leader Jonas Savimbi repeated a ritual that twice previously had failed to halt fighting.
NEWS
September 16, 1993 | STANLEY MEISLER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Jonas Savimbi, once America's favored guerrilla chieftain, felt the wrath of the United Nations on Wednesday as the Security Council condemned his rebellion against the Angolan government and approved sanctions against his political movement. The council acted after receiving a report from Secretary General Boutros Boutros-Ghali that 1,000 people are dying every day from the war, "the highest fatality rate of any conflict in the world."
NEWS
June 1, 1991 | SCOTT KRAFT, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The historic accord signed Friday to end the 16-year civil war in Angola is no ticket to peace and prosperity, but it offers the first glimmer of hope for democracy and economic recovery in what has been one of Africa's most troubled nations. "There are a lot of things that can still go wrong," said Gerald J. Bender, an international expert on Angola at USC. "But, basically, it's going to be surprisingly smooth for a country that just fought a long civil war."
NEWS
January 4, 1999 | From Times Wire Reports
The United Nations gave the government and rebels in Angola notice of the flight plan for a plane that was shot down, a U.N. spokesman said. The plane was believed hit by antiaircraft fire and went down Saturday with eight people aboard. There was no word on survivors. The C-130 was the second U.N.-chartered aircraft to crash in the war zone in eight days.
NEWS
January 30, 1999 | From Times Wire Reports
Angola's main rebel group said it was battling a heavily armed government regiment for control of the central highland town of Catabola, 60 miles from Andulo, the political and military headquarters of veteran guerrilla leader Jonas Savimbi's National Union for the Total Independence of Angola, or UNITA. He has remained there since 1996. Meanwhile, President Jose Eduardo dos Santos reshuffled his government, taking personal charge of the armed forces' campaign against UNITA.
NEWS
August 28, 2001 | From Times Wire Reports
Gunmen in northwestern Angola fired a missile at a passenger bus and then sprayed it with gunfire, killing at least 50 people, including several children, news reports said. The attack occurred Friday, Roman Catholic radio station Ecclesia said, citing local police. Many bodies were charred or blown to pieces, making a victim count difficult.
NEWS
August 16, 2001 | From Times Wire Reports
The death toll in the ambush of a train by Angolan rebels rose to 252 after rescue workers identified an additional 100 bodies in the smoldering wreck, the government said. The train, carrying more than 500 people fleeing fighting between government forces and the rebels, hit two land mines Friday, derailed and burst into flames. Rebels then sprayed the survivors with gunfire, witnesses said.
NEWS
June 17, 2001 | From Associated Press
The United Nations has halted all aid flights in Angola after a ground-to-air missile narrowly missed two of its planes in the second attack on aid aircraft this month. The U.N. World Food Program on Friday announced an indefinite suspension of flights in the war-devastated country and warned of an "unprecedented humanitarian catastrophe" if it is unable to resume deliveries this week.
NEWS
May 11, 2001 | From Times Wire Reports
Tens of thousands of people fled a rural town after an attack by the UNITA rebel group and are seeking refuge in Luanda, the capital, government officials said. The Angolan government estimated that about 30,000 civilians had fled Caxito, about 40 miles northeast of Luanda, after Saturday's attack, Roman Catholic radio station Ecclesia reported, citing unnamed government sources.
NEWS
May 8, 2001 | From Associated Press
In their boldest attack in months, UNITA rebels overran a town near this capital, killing 79 people and interrogating foreign aid workers, officials said Monday. About 200 rebels attacked Caxito, a town of 50,000 about 40 miles northeast of Luanda, at dawn Saturday, the army said in a statement. The statement did not provide casualty figures, but an aid official in Luanda who was in contact with colleagues in Caxito said 79 people, including soldiers, police officers and civilians, were killed.
NEWS
July 20, 2000 | From Times Wire Services
The international diamond industry announced strict new measures Wednesday to clamp down on the trade in "conflict diamonds" used to pay for wars in Africa. The measures include a certification system to closely track rough diamonds from the time they're mined, as well as tough penalties for dealers who break U.N. embargoes on diamond sales by rebels in Angola and Sierra Leone.
NEWS
January 7, 1999 | From Times Wire Reports
Angolan President Jose Eduardo dos Santos has promised to help a U.N. team reach the wreckage of two U.N.-chartered planes that recently crashed in a war zone with a total of 22 people on board, U.N. special envoy Benon Sevan said. However, Sevan did not win government assurances of a cease-fire so a U.N. rescue team can search for survivors.
NEWS
May 11, 2001 | From Times Wire Reports
Tens of thousands of people fled a rural town after an attack by the UNITA rebel group and are seeking refuge in Luanda, the capital, government officials said. The Angolan government estimated that about 30,000 civilians had fled Caxito, about 40 miles northeast of Luanda, after Saturday's attack, Roman Catholic radio station Ecclesia reported, citing unnamed government sources.
NEWS
March 11, 2000 | From Associated Press
Two sitting African presidents are among several officials implicated in a U.N. report that details sanctions violations that have enabled rebels in Angola to finance their war, two sources who read the report said Friday. Presidents Gnassingbe Eyadema of Togo and Blaise Compaore of Burkina Faso are accused of having allowed sanctions-breaking activities in their countries, the sources said on condition of anonymity. The U.N.
NEWS
February 7, 2000 | DEAN E. MURPHY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The soldiers appeared on the road out of nowhere and began shooting. The oncoming minibus swerved left, then right. The driver stopped and ran for his life. Theodora Chizabulyo, 16, was seated next to her aunt, Noreen Kwala, who pushed her and two school friends to the floor. The woman then crept on top of them. "Don't cry," whispered Kwala. "Keep quiet and pretend to be dead." Theodora felt the sting of hot lead in her back. She held her breath. The men grabbed everything.
Los Angeles Times Articles
|