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Animal Abuse

NEWS
January 18, 1995 | Associated Press
A dog owner who didn't want a litter of nine puppies allegedly buried them alive, but their mother rescued them the next day by digging them out of their 2-foot-deep grave. All nine survived, and the veterinarian caring for the mother and squirming, sightless puppies has received 25 adoption offers. The puppies are a Rottweiler-chow-Labrador mix, and most are black and tan. Prosecutors will decide whether to file charges. The owner could be charged with aggravated animal abuse.
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NATIONAL
October 23, 2008 | The Associated Press
Six farm employees in Iowa were charged with animal abuse and neglect Wednesday in connection with a video obtained by an animal-rights group that showed workers abusing pigs. Authorities in Greene County northwest of Des Moines began investigating about a month ago after People for the Ethical Treatment of Animals released a video of workers at a farm in BayardIowa, hitting sows with metal rods, slamming piglets on a concrete floor and bragging about sodomizing sows with rods.
MAGAZINE
March 28, 1993 | Kathleen Moloney
Barbara Fabricant is frustrated. More than 20 pet poisonings and maimings have occurred in the Silver Lake hills in the past five months and she hasn't got a clue about the culprit or the motive. "I've seen hundreds of strychnine poisoning cases," she says. "Usually it's a neighbor who doesn't like the sound of dogs barking or hates cats because they spray. This time it's both dogs and cats." Fabricant, 67, is no novice when it comes to defending helpless creatures.
OPINION
March 18, 2011
"Puppy mills" are the factory farms of dog breeding ? big and, all too often, neglectful and cruel. Female dogs are frequently overbred in back-to-back heat cycles to the point that their bones break and their teeth fall out. Hundreds, even thousands, of breeding dogs and puppies can end up crammed into filthy cages, according to animal welfare advocates, who have made numerous undercover videos of some of the worst abusers across the country. But like factory farms, puppy mills are perfectly legal.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 3, 2010 | By David Kelly
A former Los Angeles County assistant fire chief was sentenced to three years' probation Friday on animal cruelty charges for beating a puppy with a 12-pound rock, injuring it so severely that it had to be euthanized. Glynn Johnson, 55, of Riverside also was required to do 400 hours of community service working with dogs, take anger-management classes and serve 90 weekend days in jail. He could have been given four years in prison, and the sentence was immediately denounced by those hoping for more jail time as a "slap on the wrist."
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 5, 2012 | By Dean Kuipers
On Friday, Iowa Gov. Terry Branstad signed into law a bill designed to thwart activists who go undercover to report animal abuse. This makes Iowa the first state in the country to pass such a law; Illinois, Indiana, Minnesota, Missouri, Nebraska, New York and Utah are considering them. Undercover investigations, including videos and photographs, are a principal tool used by activists of all stripes to document abuse cases and have led to legislative reforms, prosecutions and even facility closures around the country.
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