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Animal Breeding

CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 26, 1999
Re "Proposed Curb on Breeding of Pets Debated," Sept. 15. You bet it ought to be illegal for dogs and cats--especially cats--to go un-neutered, illegal because it's immoral for pet owners to sit idly by while more unwanted companion animals are born to breed, fight and crowd neighborhoods and shelters, only to either be neglected or be killed at pounds. Parts of Los Angeles resemble third world countries now with their pitiful, discarded, starving cats and dogs. As for breeders, sorry, but you're perpetuating the demand as well as the supply.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 15, 1999 | MARTHA L. WILLMAN and ANDREW BLANKSTEIN, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
A highly polarized crowd of about 200 animal lovers attended a meeting Tuesday night of the Los Angeles Animal Regulation Commission, debating a controversial proposal to curtail animal breeding. Addressing the panel, speakers from the two factions could agree on only one thing: The city is overrun with homeless and unwanted animals. The issue has pitted animal rights and rescue groups against breeders and owners of purebred pets. While some animal-issue groups, such as the American Humane Assn.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 22, 1999 | MARTHA L. WILLMAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
More than 300 horses gambol on a 40-acre desert ranch in a remote corner of the Antelope Valley. But if it weren't for Linda Moss and her army of volunteers, the horses would have met an entirely different fate--in the slaughterhouse. "We have a little miracle going up there," said Moss, who runs a Glendale-based group called Equus Sanctuary. The Antelope Valley ranch--whose location is a carefully guarded secret--costs more than $30,000 a month to maintain.
NEWS
March 14, 1999 | TONY PERRY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
They are the first couple of panda-dom, but theirs has not been a loving or (re)productive relationship. She is young, frisky, fecund. He is middle-aged, sedentary, still potent but uninterested in launching his DNA delivery system. There is not another couple like them in North America. They do not lack for visitors.
BUSINESS
March 6, 1999 | JOHN O'DELL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A mother and son accused by securities regulators of swindling investors out of almost $820,000 in an Orange County-based ostrich farm scam have been ordered to repay investors and were barred from future violations of securities law. In a civil complaint last year, the Securities and Exchange Commission alleged that Loretta Antrim, 71, of Irvine, and her son, Patrick L. Antrim, 49, of Trabuco Canyon, sold contracts for the sale and boarding of breeding pairs of ostriches to 83 investors.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 4, 1999 | JULIE HA, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A whodunit is quickly turning into a soap opera at the Los Angeles Zoo, where two more pregnant chimps have some explaining to do. First, Yoshiko, who had been seen with male chimp Jerrard, gave birth to a baby in January. Zookeepers hadn't even known she was pregnant. And all three male chimps of breeding age, including Jerrard, had had vasectomies.
NEWS
February 3, 1999 | MIKE DOWNEY
On the morning of Super Bowl Sunday, we had an immaculate conception. A chimpanzee at the Los Angeles Zoo gave birth, with no visible means of becoming pregnant. Her name is Yoshi, and her baby's name is Toshi. (Another brave single mom.) Zookeepers are baffled. It is either a miracle, a mystery or Yoshi's been sneaking out at night, having an illicit romance. For which she eventually will have to answer to Henry Hyde. Until then, I have volunteered my assistance to the L.A.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 22, 1998 | PATRICK MCGREEVY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The city Animal Regulation Commission voted Monday to more than triple the cost of licenses for un-neutered dogs in Los Angeles to $100, citing a public health crisis caused by 44,000 stray canines roaming city streets. Despite opposition from owners of breeder and show dogs, the commission also voted to double the fee for a breeder's license from $50 to $100. The Los Angeles City Council will decide on the new fees which combined would generate $2 million in additional funds annually.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 28, 1998 | MARTHA L. WILLMAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Opponents of a proposed state law regulating puppy breeders are expected to pack a state senate committee hearing in Sacramento today in an effort to block a measure designed to collect an estimated $80 million a year in sales tax revenues. The bill by Sen. Herschel Rosenthal (D-Van Nuys) also would give pet buyers legal recourse to collect from breeders the costs of treating a genetically unsound or seriously ill dog.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 28, 1998 | MARTHA L. WILLMAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Opponents of a proposed state law regulating puppy breeders are expected to pack a state Senate committee hearing in Sacramento today in an effort to block a measure designed to collect about $80 million annually in sales tax revenue. The bill, by state Sen. Herschel Rosenthal (D-Los Angeles), would give pet buyers legal recourse to collect from breeders the costs of treating a genetically unsound or seriously ill dog.
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