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Animal Breeding

BUSINESS
March 6, 1999 | JOHN O'DELL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A mother and son accused by securities regulators of swindling investors out of almost $820,000 in an Orange County-based ostrich farm scam have been ordered to repay investors and were barred from future violations of securities law. In a civil complaint last year, the Securities and Exchange Commission alleged that Loretta Antrim, 71, of Irvine, and her son, Patrick L. Antrim, 49, of Trabuco Canyon, sold contracts for the sale and boarding of breeding pairs of ostriches to 83 investors.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 4, 1999 | JULIE HA, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A whodunit is quickly turning into a soap opera at the Los Angeles Zoo, where two more pregnant chimps have some explaining to do. First, Yoshiko, who had been seen with male chimp Jerrard, gave birth to a baby in January. Zookeepers hadn't even known she was pregnant. And all three male chimps of breeding age, including Jerrard, had had vasectomies.
NEWS
February 3, 1999 | MIKE DOWNEY
On the morning of Super Bowl Sunday, we had an immaculate conception. A chimpanzee at the Los Angeles Zoo gave birth, with no visible means of becoming pregnant. Her name is Yoshi, and her baby's name is Toshi. (Another brave single mom.) Zookeepers are baffled. It is either a miracle, a mystery or Yoshi's been sneaking out at night, having an illicit romance. For which she eventually will have to answer to Henry Hyde. Until then, I have volunteered my assistance to the L.A.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 22, 1998 | PATRICK MCGREEVY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The city Animal Regulation Commission voted Monday to more than triple the cost of licenses for un-neutered dogs in Los Angeles to $100, citing a public health crisis caused by 44,000 stray canines roaming city streets. Despite opposition from owners of breeder and show dogs, the commission also voted to double the fee for a breeder's license from $50 to $100. The Los Angeles City Council will decide on the new fees which combined would generate $2 million in additional funds annually.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 28, 1998 | MARTHA L. WILLMAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Opponents of a proposed state law regulating puppy breeders are expected to pack a state senate committee hearing in Sacramento today in an effort to block a measure designed to collect an estimated $80 million a year in sales tax revenues. The bill by Sen. Herschel Rosenthal (D-Van Nuys) also would give pet buyers legal recourse to collect from breeders the costs of treating a genetically unsound or seriously ill dog.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 28, 1998 | MARTHA L. WILLMAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Opponents of a proposed state law regulating puppy breeders are expected to pack a state Senate committee hearing in Sacramento today in an effort to block a measure designed to collect about $80 million annually in sales tax revenue. The bill, by state Sen. Herschel Rosenthal (D-Los Angeles), would give pet buyers legal recourse to collect from breeders the costs of treating a genetically unsound or seriously ill dog.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 26, 1998
Australian biologists say they have for the first time developed a reliable, repeatable technique to produce horses through in vitro fertilization. Producing a foal through such techniques has been accomplished only twice before, and neither effort has been replicated. A team from the Goulburn Valley Equine Hospital in Monash announced Wednesday that a foal born March 9 was produced by injecting a single sperm into an egg, a technique developed to assist infertile humans.
NEWS
January 13, 1998 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
It looks like motherhood isn't ln the cards for Muffin, a 6-foot-long Komodo dragon at the National Zoo. Muffin had cataract surgery in February to repair blindness in her right eye. The blindness, combined with her relatively small size, had made it difficult for her to mate. After her surgery--the procedure was a first for a Komodo--zoo officials had hoped fertility treatments would make it possible to breed her.
NEWS
December 16, 1997 | JESSE KATZ, TIMES STAFF WRITER
This is how insane the emu market was a few years back, just before the Vinson family got into the business of raising flightless birds: An unhatched chick could fetch up to $4,000. Mature breeders were being insured at more than $50,000 a pair. Microchips had to be embedded under each animal's skin to guard against rustlers.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 18, 1997 | JOHN CANALIS
A wild donkey rescued by a federal program and adopted by Centennial Farm at the Orange County Fairgrounds soon will give birth. Sugar, a 4-year-old white burro, is expected to deliver the farm's first donkey foal in mid-October after an 11-month pregnancy. She was acquired through the federal Bureau of Land Management, which rounds up wild horses and donkeys that proliferate too quickly. When Sugar was rescued in 1995, she was with an inbred foal that later died.
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