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Animal Breeding

NEWS
January 31, 2001 | MARIA L. La GANGA and JOHN M. GLIONNA, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
What first looked like a terrifying tragedy--young woman killed by rogue dog--has revealed an illegal guard dog-breeding operation run from behind the walls of the state's most secure prison, law enforcement officials said Tuesday. Authorities investigating the death of Diane Whipple, 33, are on the trail of a bizarre story, complete with white supremacists, a surprise adoption and the Mexican Mafia.
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SPORTS
January 5, 2001 | BILL CHRISTINE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
His old trainer, John Russell, might have difficulty recognizing Cee's Tizzy now. He raced as a gray during a short career of six races in 1990, but he has turned completely white, save for dozens of small flecks of black all over his enormous body. It looks as though someone stood next to Cee's Tizzy with a ballpoint pen that exploded. You can also color Cee's Tizzy green, as in greenbacks.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 7, 2000 | MARTHA L. WILLMAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
After more than two hours of testimony from animal activists and pleas by a group of fifth-graders, a Los Angeles City Council committee Monday pushed ahead controversial proposals aimed at reducing the number of unaltered and stray dogs and cats. If adopted by the full City Council, the new rules and higher fees would give Los Angeles what is believed to be the toughest ordinance on spaying and neutering of any major city in America.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 7, 2000 | MARTHA L. WILLMAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
After more than two hours of testimony from animal activists and pleas by a group of fifth-graders, a Los Angeles City Council committee on Monday pushed ahead a controversial proposal to hike fees aimed at reducing the number of unaltered and stray dogs and cats. If adopted by the full City Council, the rules could give Los Angeles what is believed to be the toughest spay/neuter ordinance of any major city in America.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 21, 1999
The apparent lesbianism displayed by the beetle Diaprepes abbreviatus is actually a ruse intended to lure nearsighted males into mating, according to researchers from Israel and Florida. Males and females of the species are virtually identical in appearance, but the females are slightly larger. Males are attracted by the scent of females, but often have difficulty discriminating between males and females.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 26, 1999
Re "Proposed Curb on Breeding of Pets Debated," Sept. 15. You bet it ought to be illegal for dogs and cats--especially cats--to go un-neutered, illegal because it's immoral for pet owners to sit idly by while more unwanted companion animals are born to breed, fight and crowd neighborhoods and shelters, only to either be neglected or be killed at pounds. Parts of Los Angeles resemble third world countries now with their pitiful, discarded, starving cats and dogs. As for breeders, sorry, but you're perpetuating the demand as well as the supply.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 15, 1999 | MARTHA L. WILLMAN and ANDREW BLANKSTEIN, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
A highly polarized crowd of about 200 animal lovers attended a meeting Tuesday night of the Los Angeles Animal Regulation Commission, debating a controversial proposal to curtail animal breeding. Addressing the panel, speakers from the two factions could agree on only one thing: The city is overrun with homeless and unwanted animals. The issue has pitted animal rights and rescue groups against breeders and owners of purebred pets. While some animal-issue groups, such as the American Humane Assn.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 15, 1999
A highly polarized crowd of about 200 animal lovers attended a meeting Tuesday night of the Los Angeles Animal Regulation Commission, debating a controversial proposal to curtail animal breeding. The issue has pitted animal rights and rescue groups against breeders and owners of purebred pets. Breeders complained that restrictions in the ordinance, such as limiting litters to one a year, would put them out of business.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 22, 1999 | MARTHA L. WILLMAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
More than 300 horses gambol on a 40-acre desert ranch in a remote corner of the Antelope Valley. But if it weren't for Linda Moss and her army of volunteers, the horses would have met an entirely different fate--in the slaughterhouse. "We have a little miracle going up there," said Moss, who runs a Glendale-based group called Equus Sanctuary. The Antelope Valley ranch--whose location is a carefully guarded secret--costs more than $30,000 a month to maintain.
NEWS
March 14, 1999 | TONY PERRY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
They are the first couple of panda-dom, but theirs has not been a loving or (re)productive relationship. She is young, frisky, fecund. He is middle-aged, sedentary, still potent but uninterested in launching his DNA delivery system. There is not another couple like them in North America. They do not lack for visitors.
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