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Animal Breeding

NEWS
December 16, 1997 | JESSE KATZ, TIMES STAFF WRITER
This is how insane the emu market was a few years back, just before the Vinson family got into the business of raising flightless birds: An unhatched chick could fetch up to $4,000. Mature breeders were being insured at more than $50,000 a pair. Microchips had to be embedded under each animal's skin to guard against rustlers.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 18, 1997 | JOHN CANALIS
A wild donkey rescued by a federal program and adopted by Centennial Farm at the Orange County Fairgrounds soon will give birth. Sugar, a 4-year-old white burro, is expected to deliver the farm's first donkey foal in mid-October after an 11-month pregnancy. She was acquired through the federal Bureau of Land Management, which rounds up wild horses and donkeys that proliferate too quickly. When Sugar was rescued in 1995, she was with an inbred foal that later died.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 6, 1997 | MARTHA L. WILLMAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Two Valley owners of English bulldogs who said their pets were stolen last week fear that the animals, normally docile but known for their extremely powerful jaws, are being snatched to cross-breed with pit bulls to produce fighting dogs. Both Amanda Heredia of Van Nuys and Jim Walsh of Sylmar were scouring a Van Nuys neighborhood Tuesday where one of the dogs disappeared and another was last seen.
SPORTS
May 16, 1997 | BILL CHRISTINE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
It was an incomplete gathering at Three Chimneys Farm in Midway, Ky., a few days before the Kentucky Derby to salute the 20th anniversary of Seattle Slew's Triple Crown. Naturally, Seattle Slew himself, the most robust 23-year-old stallion in the universe, was there; and also on hand were Mickey and Karen Taylor, who raced the hyperactive colt in a partnership during that incandescent year of 1977.
SPORTS
March 14, 1997 | From Associated Press
The cloning of Cigar might be an "interesting experiment," says the man whose racing colors Cigar carried so grandly in two Horse of the Year campaigns. "If somebody who is qualified wants to come and get a patch off him it would be all right," Allen Paulson said. The 7-year-old horse has been a dud at stud and might be sterile. Paulson said Cigar has mated with 40 mares and none is in foal. In any event, Paulson certainly is not counting on a cloned Cigar.
SPORTS
March 8, 1997 | From Associated Press
Should Cigar, the 1995-96 Horse of the Year, fail at stud, it's unlikely he would race again. "I doubt it," said Allen Paulson, who raced the 7-year-old Cigar and expects to buy him back should he prove to be sterile. "I think I'll take him back to my farm and take care of him." Paulson said he understood that he had first right to buy Cigar back should he not succeed at breeding. "I'm still shocked he hasn't been able to get any mares in foal," Paulson said Friday.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 27, 1996 | MAKI BECKER, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Things are getting real fuzzy around here. Karen and Janie (pronounced Janny), two cute Queensland koalas, had a coming out party Wednesday morning at the Los Angeles Zoo as they were carried by their keepers to new digs--an outdoor exhibit in the Australia section.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 7, 1996 | From Times staff and wire reports
British researchers said they have used a revolutionary technique to clone sheep for the first time and that their advance could revolutionize livestock breeding. The researchers report in today's edition of the journal Nature that their method could be used to manufacture large numbers of identical animals that would produce genetically manipulated meat and milk on factory farms. Ian Wilmutand and colleagues at the Roslin Institute in Edinburgh grew cells from a sheep embryo.
NEWS
February 8, 1996 | CARLA HALL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Keepers at the Oakland Zoo were surprised to find a newborn male lying among the African elephants one cool morning last November. The animal's mother was even more clueless--when the new arrival could stand on its wobbly legs, she swatted him with her trunk. By the end of the day, zookeepers had whisked the 190-pound infant away to embark upon a rare, controversial and largely uncharted journey--they would hand-rear the baby elephant.
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