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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 15, 2009 | Rich Connell
An animal control officer lost half of her thumb Thursday when she was attacked by a pit bull. Officer Martha Muro, 26, remained hospitalized Thursday evening. Doctors were evaluating whether a recovered portion of the thumb could be reattached, said Capt. Aaron Reyes of the Southeast Area Animal Control Authority. Muro was making a follow-up visit to a house on Live Oak Street when two dogs escaped and broke through a hole in a front gate and a male pit bull attacked. -- Rich Connell
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 7, 2009 | Eric Bailey and Patrick McGreevy
Errant motorists beware: Puppy hit-and-run could soon be a crime. Pushing animal rights in a new direction, a state lawmaker has proposed slapping California motorists with a fine and possible jail time if they flee after hitting a jaywalking dog, cat or any other pet or farm animal. The measure by Mike Eng (D-Monterey Park) would require that drivers attempt to provide aid to an injured critter and notify the owner or animal-control authorities.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 17, 2009 | Bob Pool
Long Beach is going to the dogs. And as they knock on doors around there and in nearby Cerritos, Seal Beach and Signal Hill in an usual hunt for canine scofflaws, about the only excuse authorities haven't heard yet is that Fido ate the license notice. Animal control workers are going house-to-house in search of unlicensed dogs in what is turning into an unusual census of the area's dog population.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 25, 2009 | Ruben Vives
A 67-year-old man was in sheriff's custody after Riverside County animal control officers found more than 300 malnourished or dead dogs and cats at his trailer home in Temecula. Elisao Jimenez was arrested on suspicion of animal cruelty and was being held in lieu of $5,000 bail at the Southwest Detention Center.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 17, 2008 | Jia-Rui Chong, Times Staff Writer
Nothing, it seems, gets between David Grigorian and his marmoset monkey. On Wednesday, the 43-year-old Van Nuys resident found himself in court once again for harboring an undocumented primate. Grigorian has told authorities that he considers Cheeta to be a member of his family, but state Department of Fish and Game officials say the animal has got to go. In January, police arrested Grigorian for allegedly shouting criminal threats in front of a house in Van Nuys.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 25, 2008 | Carla Hall, Times Staff Writer
If you've been on the L.A. Animal Services website any time in the last couple of months, you know the department maintains a digital countdown of the days, hours, minutes and seconds until the city's spay/neuter law goes into effect Wednesday. Now, there's less than a week to comply with the ordinance requiring most pet cats and dogs in Los Angeles to be sterilized. There are a number of reduced-cost options for sterilizing your animal.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 12, 2008 | Mike Anton, Times Staff Writer
At first glance, the 6-foot-tall tangle of pipe wrapped in a blanket of barbed wire could be mistaken for a lot of things: a plumbing project gone terribly awry. A robot from a low-budget 1950s sci-fi flick. Maybe a piece of modern art. But a cactus? Scientists experimenting with ways to restore the coastal habitat of a beleaguered bird hope so. In recent weeks they've planted 15 of these homemade, green-painted contraptions on fire-scarred hills throughout Orange County's Irvine Ranch Conservancy to try to entice a declining population of cactus wrens to nest.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 5, 2008 | David Kelly, Times Staff Writer
With real estate values plummeting and foreclosed homes sitting empty, a family of bobcats apparently decided the time was right to pounce. So last week, they slipped out of the parched foothills of Lake Elsinore and into a spacious, vacant home in well-groomed Tuscany Hills. Residents of the development got their first look Aug. 27 when the feline squatters -- at least two adults and three kittens -- lolled atop a wall outside the Spanish-style house. Someone called 911, reporting mountain lions.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 27, 2008 | Louis Sahagun, Times Staff Writer
It's been a summer of tough breaks on a remote ranch where Barbara Clarke had hoped hundreds of old and ailing horses could live out their final days amid sagebrush prairie and juniper forests. Now, Clarke has almost run out of hay and money to buy more for the animals with tattered manes, sagging backs and yearning eyes that she had rescued. Her predicament underlines the precarious finances of animal sanctuaries that live and die on the donations of others. Some of Clarke's animals were taken from sanctuaries that could no longer afford to care for them.
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