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Animal Feed

NEWS
January 3, 1997 | MARLENE CIMONS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The Food and Drug Administration took steps Thursday to ban the use of cow, sheep and goat tissue in most animal feeds to ensure against the transmission of "mad cow disease," which has been linked to at least 10 cases of a fatal human neurological disorder in Britain. Health and Human Services Secretary Donna Shalala called the U.S. action "precautionary," because there have been no cases of the disease reported in the United States. Last year, the U.S.
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NEWS
May 4, 1998 | RICHARD BOUDREAUX, TIMES STAFF WRITER
As storks, egrets and herons swoop low over glassy wetlands stretching as far as the eye can see, Jose Antonio Ramos and his fishing buddy Pedro Reyes are at the Guadiamar River by daybreak. It would be an idyllic outing but for the carnage at their feet. Wearing gas masks and yellow rubber gloves, the two men walk upstream along the muddy bank, gathering the carcasses of fish, crabs, frogs and eels still dying from a 9-day-old toxic spill that threatens Europe's largest nature reserve.
BUSINESS
January 4, 2006 | From Associated Press
New breeds of pint-sized heifers and bulls are making it easier for farmers with limited space to raise cattle for milk, meat or just fun. On Bill Bryan's 50-acre spread on Maryland's Eastern Shore, he has sold seven calves this year. "We've sold the vast majority of our calves to people who have these little three- to five-acre farmettes, and they'll fence in an acre, buy a calf and more or less keep 'em for pets," Bryan said.
NATIONAL
August 12, 2009 | DeeDee Correll, Correll writes for The Times.
Donna Munson, 74, considered the black bears that swarmed across her land in southwestern Colorado to be her pets. She fed them dog food and scraps -- poking the food through a metal fence she'd built around her porch -- attracting so many bruins that neighbors sometimes counted as many as 14 on her property at a time. On Friday, one of them killed and ate Munson, slashing her head through the fence and dragging her body underneath it to consume her. "She was dead-set on continuing to feed the bears, and unfortunately, she paid the ultimate price," said Ouray County Sheriff's Investigator Joel Burk, who had to shoot a bear that tried to approach Munson's remains as he interviewed witnesses at the scene.
BUSINESS
February 22, 2013 | By Tiffany Hsu, Los Angeles Times
When Junior's Deli closed in late December, longtime customers lined up for a last, nostalgic nosh at the 53-year-old Westside institution. But Brian Won's main reaction was "meh. " "The food was unremarkable," said the West Los Angeles IT specialist, 32, who visited to use up a Groupon voucher. "Given that there are so many good places to eat in L.A., I have a really hard time saying yes to that. " Increasing apathy, particularly from younger patrons, has driven traditional Jewish delicatessens from their mid-century pinnacle.
BUSINESS
June 19, 2001 | Bloomberg News
Land O'Lakes Inc., a farmer-owned dairy producer, agreed to buy Purina Mills Inc. for about $230 million in cash, to create the largest animal-feed maker in North America. Privately held Land O'Lakes, based in Arden Hills, Minn., agreed to pay $23 for each Purina Mills share, or 19% more than the closing price Friday for the maker of feeds for animals ranging from goats to guinea pigs. Land O'Lakes would assume about $130 million in debt, said Purina Chief Executive Brad Kerbs. Shares of St.
NEWS
November 8, 2000 | From Times Wire Reports
President Jacques Chirac urged drastic new precautions against mad cow disease, and a top health official predicted that more people will die as France's proud culinary tradition took a hammering. Chirac called on the government to suspend immediately the use of meat and bone meal in all animal feed amid growing anxiety about the spread of the cattle illness.
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