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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 22, 2001 | JASON SONG, TIMES STAFF WRITER
James C. Nofziger, a well-known animal nutritionist who had ties to the Reagan administration and worked on a federal animal preservation committee, has died. He was 78. The longtime San Fernando Valley resident, who helped develop animal feed and was appointed to the Marine Mammal Commission in 1981, died Feb. 18 in his sleep. Nofziger had recently undergone surgery for a brain tumor, family members said.
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NEWS
January 12, 2001 | From Times Wire Reports
Hundreds of animal feed producers are violating rules intended to keep mad cow disease out of the United States, prompting the government to warn that companies must shape up or expect shutdowns, even prosecution. The food supply remains safe despite the violations because no cases of mad cow disease have been found in U.S. cattle, the Food and Drug Administration said.
NEWS
May 4, 1998 | RICHARD BOUDREAUX, TIMES STAFF WRITER
As storks, egrets and herons swoop low over glassy wetlands stretching as far as the eye can see, Jose Antonio Ramos and his fishing buddy Pedro Reyes are at the Guadiamar River by daybreak. It would be an idyllic outing but for the carnage at their feet. Wearing gas masks and yellow rubber gloves, the two men walk upstream along the muddy bank, gathering the carcasses of fish, crabs, frogs and eels still dying from a 9-day-old toxic spill that threatens Europe's largest nature reserve.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 28, 1997
The Food and Drug Administration, skewered in the early 1990s for its dilatory approval of new drugs, particularly those that some doctors thought useful against AIDS, in more recent times has been accused of a laggardly pace in the second of its purviews, protection of Americans against food-borne diseases. Stung, the agency has mounted a vigorous response: Earlier this month it banned all cow, sheep and goat tissue in animal feeds.
NEWS
January 3, 1997 | MARLENE CIMONS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The Food and Drug Administration took steps Thursday to ban the use of cow, sheep and goat tissue in most animal feeds to ensure against the transmission of "mad cow disease," which has been linked to at least 10 cases of a fatal human neurological disorder in Britain. Health and Human Services Secretary Donna Shalala called the U.S. action "precautionary," because there have been no cases of the disease reported in the United States. Last year, the U.S.
NEWS
June 14, 1996 | From Associated Press
The cows may be mad, but the French are furious: They may have unknowingly imported vast amounts of animal feed banned in Britain for fear it might carry mad cow disease. The science magazine Nature, citing British government statistics, reported Thursday that Britain sold France thousands of tons of potentially contaminated feed from 1989 to 1991 that it could not sell at home. France reacted angrily to the British weekly's report.
BUSINESS
August 4, 1988 | BRUCE KEPPEL, Times Staff Writer
Rice bran--long consigned to feed for cattle and pigs--can now be rendered economically fit for human consumption, thanks to technology developed by Brady International of Torrance. Brady International announced shipment to two California mills Wednesday of its rice-bran processor, which resulted from a government program aimed at making better use of the world's present supply of rice. The development could also improve nutrition in this fiber-conscious country as well as abroad.
BUSINESS
March 2, 1987 | WILLIAM J. EATON, Times Staff Writer
An American firm has installed the latest high-tech equipment on a state dairy farm here in hopes of helping the Soviet Union get more milk from each of its 40 million cows. Instead of a bell around its neck, every one of the 400 cows taking part in the experiment will wear a transponder, an electronic identification tag bearing a number from one to 400.
BUSINESS
July 11, 1986
The price that BP Nutrition paid for Purina Mills, which controls about 10% of the U.S. animal feed market, wasn't disclosed. St. Louis-based Purina Mills produces feed for horses, cattle, chickens, hogs and other farm animals. The company employs about 3,000 at 70 plants in 32 states. BP Nutrition, a unit of British Petroleum, operates a major animal feed business in Europe.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 26, 1986
Your front-page story of (March 4), "What's the Beef?" failed to take into consideration that higher consciousness is also a contributing factor to the decline in consumption of red meat. More and more young people are waking up to the fact that "meat is murder" (also the title song of an album made in England), and most people taper off of flesh food by first cutting out red meat, then chicken and then fish. Meat of any kind is not necessary to our diet and has been proven to cause all kinds of health problems.
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