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BUSINESS
June 7, 2012 | By Tiffany Hsu
Pfizer Inc., the largest drug maker in the U.S., is planning to spin off its animal health unit into a separate company, named Zoetis, that will be partially owned by shareholders. Let's deal with the name first. Zoetis derives from the root "zo," which means "pertaining to life" and isĀ found in words such as "zoo" and "zoetic," Pfizer said. The name is starting to draw comparisons to Mondelez, Kraft Foods' new name for its spinoff snacks unit. Both are kind of hard to say. Zoetis is pronounced "zo-AY-tis," while Mondelez, which means "delicious world," is "mohn-da-LEEZ.
ARTICLES BY DATE
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 28, 2013 | By Jill Cowan
As aid workers from around the world descended on the Philippines to help the people hit hardest by Typhoon Haiyan last month, Springer Browne headed toward the devastation for a different reason: the animals. The 31-year-old Newport Beach native made the trip as a volunteer for World Vets, a sort of veterinary equivalent of the humanitarian group Doctors Without Borders, which provides urgent medical care worldwide. World Vets sends veterinarians to work with animals around the world through various projects based on an area's needs.
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BUSINESS
May 27, 2005 | From Bloomberg News
The World Organization of Animal Health said countries with mad cow disease should be allowed to export certain cuts of beef, allowing for a lifting of bans on U.S. and European Union meat. Red-muscle meat without bones is safe if the animal isn't suspected of having the brain-wasting disease bovine spongiform encephalopathy, or BSE, Alex Thiermann, an official from the organization, said at a news conference in Paris. The body is responsible for setting animal health standards.
BUSINESS
June 7, 2012 | By Tiffany Hsu
Pfizer Inc., the largest drug maker in the U.S., is planning to spin off its animal health unit into a separate company, named Zoetis, that will be partially owned by shareholders. Let's deal with the name first. Zoetis derives from the root "zo," which means "pertaining to life" and isĀ found in words such as "zoo" and "zoetic," Pfizer said. The name is starting to draw comparisons to Mondelez, Kraft Foods' new name for its spinoff snacks unit. Both are kind of hard to say. Zoetis is pronounced "zo-AY-tis," while Mondelez, which means "delicious world," is "mohn-da-LEEZ.
BUSINESS
November 24, 1994 | From Reuters
British drug group SmithKline Beecham agreed Wednesday to sell its worldwide animal health business to Pfizer Inc. for $1.45 billion in cash as part of a strategy to concentrate on its human health care business. SmithKline said it would concentrate on building on global synergies between its pharmaceutical, clinical laboratory and consumer health care businesses.
BUSINESS
December 20, 1996 | Times Staff and Wire Reports
Merck & Co. and Rhone-Poulenc said they are combining their animal health businesses in a joint venture, creating the world's largest maker of medicines for pets and livestock. The venture, to be called Merial Animal Health, will have yearly sales of about $1.7 billion, leapfrogging Pfizer Inc.'s business to become the world leader in the $10.7-billion market.
BUSINESS
May 28, 1987
Synbiotics Corp. and International Minerals & Chemical Corp. have signed an agreement in principle designed to speed commercialization of Synbiotics' monoclonal antibody technology. According to terms of the proposal, IMC will contribute a minimum of $6.75 million to Synbiotics during the next five years in return for the marketing rights to some of Synbiotics animal health products. IMC also will acquire common stock and warrants from Synbiotics.
NEWS
November 21, 1993 | Associated Press
The old nag was missing an ear, its tail and both eyes, and stood alone in a field next to a saddle shop for days. It's no wonder someone called to complain to animal health officials about the Bits 'N' Boots saddlery. But when Jerry Greenwood of the Humane Society of North Bay and District arrived on the scene, it didn't take him long to uncover the truth--the neglected animal was actually a fiberglass statue.
NEWS
August 6, 2011 | By Jeannine Stein, Los Angeles Times / For the Booster Shots blog
Something good has come out of the dreadful 2007 melamine pet food recall: The Pet Event Tracking Network was launched this week to allow the Food and Drug Administration and federal and state agencies to share information in real time about pet food-related incidents such as food-borne illnesses and defective pet products. Announced by the Partnership for Food Protection and the FDA , PETNet will allow members to post about suspicious incidents and product defects, alerting others who can then track the data and share more information.
NATIONAL
May 26, 2010 | By Nicole Santa Cruz and Julie Cart, Los Angeles Times
Some fishermen who have been hired by BP to clean up the gulf oil spill say they have become ill after working long hours near waters fouled with oil and dispersant, prompting a Louisiana lawmaker to call on the federal government to open mobile clinics in rural areas to treat them. The fishermen report severe headaches, dizziness, nausea and difficulty breathing. Concerned by the reports, Rep. Charlie Melancon (D-La.) wrote to Health and Human Services Secretary Kathleen Sebelius asking the agency's help providing medical treatment, especially in Plaquemines Parish, a southern region where many fishermen live.
OPINION
October 28, 2008 | Wayne Pacelle, Wayne Pacelle is president and chief executive of the Humane Society of the United States. www.YesonProp2.com
Two weeks ago, video from an undercover investigation at Norco Ranch, owned by Missouri-based Moark, was released to the public showing pitiful images of animals abused at a California factory farm. The undercover investigator not only recorded images of four to six birds crammed into small cages and unable to extend their wings, but also dead birds in cages, birds with legs or other body parts caught in the wire caging, and the animals living in absolute filth and squalor.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 21, 2005
In the decade since the Los Angeles Zoo came close to losing its accreditation, $37.5 million has gone into building an animal health center and exhibits that more closely resemble natural environments. Here are some of the steps taken to make the zoo friendlier for animals and for human visitors: -- Sea Lion Cliffs exhibit This Thursday, the zoo will celebrate its new entranceway complex and open the saltwater sea lion habitat to the public.
BUSINESS
May 27, 2005 | From Bloomberg News
The World Organization of Animal Health said countries with mad cow disease should be allowed to export certain cuts of beef, allowing for a lifting of bans on U.S. and European Union meat. Red-muscle meat without bones is safe if the animal isn't suspected of having the brain-wasting disease bovine spongiform encephalopathy, or BSE, Alex Thiermann, an official from the organization, said at a news conference in Paris. The body is responsible for setting animal health standards.
OPINION
July 1, 2002
Re "Health Care Takes Deep Cuts," June 27: Other countries forced to make similar draconian cuts in their public health systems have seen outbreaks of dangerous infectious diseases that otherwise could have been tracked, contained or cured. The cutbacks the Los Angeles County supervisors were forced to make have increased the probability of just such an outbreak here. I would strongly advise the well-to-do in our community not to think of this as a problem confined to the poor and indigent among us. It potentially affects everyone.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 28, 1992 | AURIANA KOUTNIK
The Animal Health Technology program at Pierce College was given a 40% increase in funding this year in an attempt to win back its American Veterinary Medical Assn. accreditation. The association withheld the program's accreditation last April after an on-site review. "They felt that additional staff was needed, that not enough money was being spent on the program, and that the laboratory facilities, mostly the equipment, was out of date," said the program's director, Lisa Eshman.
OPINION
March 18, 2001 | BRIAN HALWEIL and DANI NIERENBERG, Brian Halweil and Dani Nierenberg are researchers at the Worldwatch Institute in Washington, D.C
The spread of mad cow disease and foot-and-mouth across Europe shows that no country is immune to the threat of animal-borne illnesses. The modern animal farm not only allows, but paves the way for the outbreak of disease. We cram thousands of genetically uniform animals into unhygienic warehouses, generating a virtual frat party for microbes. We recycle animal manure and slaughterhouse waste as feed. We process meat at breakneck speed in the presence of blood, feces and other contagions.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 16, 2000 | ZANTO PEABODY and HILARY E. MacGREGOR, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
Martine Colette has walked with lions in Tujunga and rounded up abused wallaroos in Malibu. For the last two decades she has charmed Hollywood celebrities, such as Bruce Willis, Will Smith and Drew Barrymore, into opening their wallets to support the Wildlife Waystation, home to nearly 1,200 injured and outcast exotic animals. She has inspired an army of volunteers to clean animal dung from cages and truck water to the 160-acre sanctuary above Tujunga.
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