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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 14, 1992
In response to "Aggressive Coyotes Evade Traps in Neighborhood" (June 6): The Times has it totally wrong! The crews from the Animal Pest Management Services did not spot one of the animals "in the back yard of a home." I believe it should be said that they spotted a home in San Clemente in the back yard of the coyotes' neighborhood. Considering what the human species has done to buffalo on their prairies, and the salmon in their streams and rivers of the Northwest is to name a few sad moments in humans' intrusion upon nature.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 14, 1992
In response to "Aggressive Coyotes Evade Traps in Neighborhood" (June 6): The Times has it totally wrong! The crews from the Animal Pest Management Services did not spot one of the animals "in the back yard of a home." I believe it should be said that they spotted a home in San Clemente in the back yard of the coyotes' neighborhood. Considering what the human species has done to buffalo on their prairies, and the salmon in their streams and rivers of the Northwest is to name a few sad moments in humans' intrusion upon nature.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 29, 1992 | LEN HALL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Forget the City Hall press conference Thursday morning heralding the upcoming arrival of federal wildlife experts to help rid the city of its coyote problem. No federal help is coming after all. A private company will do the job instead. San Clemente Fire Chief Jim W. Knight said late Thursday that his morning announcement was premature.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 29, 1992 | LEN HALL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Forget the City Hall press conference Thursday morning heralding the upcoming arrival of federal wildlife experts to help rid the city of its coyote problem. No federal help is coming after all. A private company will do the job instead. San Clemente Fire Chief Jim W. Knight said late Thursday that his morning announcement was premature.
NEWS
July 20, 1992 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Homeowners in affluent sections of Orange County have been aggravated by what experts call the worst infestation of mice in a decade. "I thought the stories were exaggerated, but then I checked into it. They're coming into people's homes, literally by the hundreds," said Dan Fox, president of Animal Pest Management Services in Chino. New tract homes in San Clemente, San Juan Capistrano and Laguna Niguel have been overwhelmed by thousands of rodents.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 16, 1992 | ANNA CEKOLA, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Animal control officials trapped two more adult coyotes over the weekend near the Forster Ranch community, but at least one more pet in the area fell victim to a coyote attack Monday morning, officials said. The two coyotes, which trappers described as "extremely aggressive," were destroyed by lethal injections Monday and sent to the county health department for rabies tests, San Clemente Fire Department spokesman Jack Stubbs said.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 29, 1997 | HOPE HAMASHIGE
Fearing that coyotes are becoming more aggressive, the City Council has decided to go on the offensive. The council voted Tuesday to begin trapping the animals in Villa Park after hearing a resident's report of two coyote attacks on domestic dogs, including a Great Dane, in as many days. Villa Park residents took the news as evidence that coyotes had become bolder and that the city should respond in kind. Mayor Barry L.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 6, 1992 | GREG HERNANDEZ, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Traps set up in back of a neighborhood here this week have so far failed to capture the one or two aggressive coyotes that experts believe are responsible for attacking a 5-year-old girl and for killing family pets, including six cats and two dogs.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 26, 1999 | ALLISON COHEN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Move over, Samson. You're getting some new neighbors. Two female beavers arrived at the Orange County Zoo on Thursday as part of a relocation program to save two dozen of the animals, which faced extermination because they have been gnawing trees in a Riverside County preserve for endangered species of birds.
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