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Animal Research

SCIENCE
June 7, 2003 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
For a century, the towering Tyrannosaurus Rex has been regarded as a savage killer marauding unchallenged across the later dinosaur era. But new research suggests a different interpretation, casting T. Rex as little more than a scavenger, stealing the kills of other carnivores. Paleontologist Jack Horner says the monster's forelegs were too short, its eyes too small and its speed too slow to make it a hunter.
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SCIENCE
May 24, 2003 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Mice implanted with ovaries from much younger mice live to a riper old age, according to UC Davis researchers. Ovaries from female mice aged 11 months (the equivalent, in mouse age, to a 50-year-old woman) were replaced by fresh ones from 2-month-old females. The mice lived 40% longer than mice that had undergone no surgery, the scientists found.
SCIENCE
May 17, 2003 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Researchers from Columbia University have devised a technique to procure pure DNA from the dung of animals, which eliminates the need to capture, sedate and draw blood from wild, endangered or aggressive animals.
SCIENCE
May 17, 2003 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Fruit flies have the rudiments of consciousness, according to a study published online in the journal Nature Neuroscience. Bruno van Swinderen and Ralph Greenspan of the Neurosciences Institute in San Diego presented flies with various images. The flies responded with a characteristic burst of brain activity.
NATIONAL
February 10, 2003 | From Times Wire Reports
A university livestock program has stopped selling former research pigs to market after the announcement of a federal investigation into whether the animals had been genetically modified. The University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign took the step after the Food and Drug Administration said more than 300 pigs sold to market should have been destroyed instead. The research involved increasing pigs' natural levels of some growth proteins already present in meat.
NATIONAL
January 24, 2003 | From Associated Press
Bugs don't have lungs, so how do they breathe? Maybe more efficiently than people, according to the first close-up view of insects forcing air in and out of tiny oxygen pipes. It took one of the world's strongest X-ray beams -- a view hundreds of times more detailed than today's most sophisticated medical scans can provide -- for scientists at the Field Museum in Chicago and Argonne National Laboratory to videotape how beetles, crickets and ants breathe.
WORLD
January 16, 2003 | From Times Wire Reports
The European Parliament approved a ban on using animals to test cosmetics in the European Union by 2009. The 626-member parliament passed the final draft with a show of hands, ending years of debate. The ban will be implemented in phases as a compromise with cosmetics firms, who had said they needed time to find alternative test methods. Where no alternatives have yet been found, in three particular toxicity test areas, a ban will be phased in by 2013.
SCIENCE
November 9, 2002 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
In the eternal war between the sexes, the lady side-blotched lizard wins it all: She selects her many mates, decides where they'll live and even determines if they will have sons or daughters. Virtually every element of the mating and reproductive cycle of the small American lizard is controlled by choices made by the female, according to UCLA biologist Ryan Calsbeek.
SCIENCE
November 9, 2002 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Gay sheep that mate only with other rams have different brain structures from "straight" sheep, a finding that may shed light on human sexuality, researchers said. Differences are similar to those in some homosexual humans, but probably go only a small way to explaining causes of different sexual orientations, an Oregon Health & Science University team said. "We are not trying to explain human sexuality by this study," physiologist Charles Roselli said.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 18, 2002 | From Times Wire Reports
After 10 days traveling across country in a Winnebago dubbed the "Piggybago," four Peninsula Humane Society volunteers returned home Friday to the San Francisco Bay area. The "Guinea Pig Crusaders" had delivered 101 of the little critters to new homes from Salt Lake City to Toledo, Ohio. They returned with two extras. One guinea pig was rescued from a research lab in Wisconsin and will be delivered next week to Vancouver.
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