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Animal Research

WORLD
January 16, 2003 | From Times Wire Reports
The European Parliament approved a ban on using animals to test cosmetics in the European Union by 2009. The 626-member parliament passed the final draft with a show of hands, ending years of debate. The ban will be implemented in phases as a compromise with cosmetics firms, who had said they needed time to find alternative test methods. Where no alternatives have yet been found, in three particular toxicity test areas, a ban will be phased in by 2013.
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SCIENCE
November 9, 2002 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
In the eternal war between the sexes, the lady side-blotched lizard wins it all: She selects her many mates, decides where they'll live and even determines if they will have sons or daughters. Virtually every element of the mating and reproductive cycle of the small American lizard is controlled by choices made by the female, according to UCLA biologist Ryan Calsbeek.
SCIENCE
November 9, 2002 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Gay sheep that mate only with other rams have different brain structures from "straight" sheep, a finding that may shed light on human sexuality, researchers said. Differences are similar to those in some homosexual humans, but probably go only a small way to explaining causes of different sexual orientations, an Oregon Health & Science University team said. "We are not trying to explain human sexuality by this study," physiologist Charles Roselli said.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 18, 2002 | From Times Wire Reports
After 10 days traveling across country in a Winnebago dubbed the "Piggybago," four Peninsula Humane Society volunteers returned home Friday to the San Francisco Bay area. The "Guinea Pig Crusaders" had delivered 101 of the little critters to new homes from Salt Lake City to Toledo, Ohio. They returned with two extras. One guinea pig was rescued from a research lab in Wisconsin and will be delivered next week to Vancouver.
WORLD
June 12, 2002 | From Times Wire Reports
EUROPE * The European Union's Parliament approved a Europe-wide sales ban on new cosmetics tested on animals, but EU member states want to water down the bill, fearing harm to exporters and violations of world trade rules. The Parliament voted 474 to 43 in Strasbourg, France, to demand that EU governments adopt the ban within five years. A majority of the governments must agree before the ban becomes law. The regulations would phase in a ban on all new cosmetic products--makeup, shampoos, etc.
NEWS
November 26, 2001 | ROSIE MESTEL, TIMES MEDICAL WRITER
The words "embryonic stem cell" evoke miraculous images to many: of freshly grown nerves repairing severed spines or treating Parkinson's or Alzheimer's diseases, of pancreas cells created in dishes and used to cure kids of diabetes. If and when such things will happen is unclear. Only three years have passed since biologists first isolated embryonic stem cell lines from humans.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 7, 2001 | RACHEL D'ORO, ASSOCIATED PRESS
John Toppenberg silently inches his inflatable raft toward the loon and its chick, veering left to approach them from an angle on the spruce-lined lake. The large diving birds bob on the glassy water, unperturbed as the Zodiac glides closer. Eight feet away, Toppenberg stops and slowly points his lens at them. "Hello, baby, how are you?" he coos. Ignoring him, the adult loon plunges into the water, disappearing for a full minute before emerging with a leech for junior.
NEWS
July 6, 2001 | ROBERT LEE HOTZ, TIMES SCIENCE WRITER
Strengthening the scientific case against human cloning, researchers have discovered that even apparently healthy clones may harbor unpredictable genetic abnormalities. In experiments with laboratory animals, scientists at the Whitehead Institute at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology and the University of Hawaii discovered that clones created with embryonic stem cells develop apparently capricious errors in when and how their genes become active.
NEWS
June 18, 2001
Tropical Storm Allison, which killed at least 18 people in Texas and Louisiana, may also have had a serious effect on medical research. Flooding at the Texas Medical Center south of Houston killed at least 32,500 research animals, mostly mice and rats. Their loss, along with the destruction of scientific records and lab specimens, will put a big dent in international medical research, said Dr. Ralph D. Feigin, president of the Baylor College of Medicine.
NEWS
April 28, 2001 | From the Washington Post
Dogs born blind are seeing the world for the first time after scientists injected new genes into their eyes. The unprecedented feat has electrified the families of the nearly 10,000 Americans born with the same disease--and hundreds of thousands of others with closely related forms of blindness. The work, led by researchers at the University of Pennsylvania, marks the first time that congenital blindness has been reversed in an animal larger than a mouse.
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