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OPINION
September 1, 2003 | Jeremy Rifkin
Though much of big science has centered on breakthroughs in biotechnology, nanotechnology and more esoteric questions like the age of our universe, a quieter story has been unfolding behind the scenes in laboratories around the world -- one whose effect on human perception and our understanding of life is likely to be profound. What these researchers are finding is that many of our fellow creatures are more like us than we had ever imagined.
ARTICLES BY DATE
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 1, 2014 | By Soumya Karlamangla, Ryan Menezes and Paresh Dave
In its 125 t h year, the Rose Parade detoured into debates over same-sex marriage and captive killer whales. Otherwise, the parade stayed largely on script, delivering its traditional mix of small-town wholesomeness, Hollywood-style entertainment and corporate sponsorship. Treated to clear skies and warm air, thousands crammed street curbs and bleachers along the parade's 5 1/2-mile route through Pasadena on Wednesday for the annual procession of marching bands, equestrian groups and elaborate floats crafted of roses, flowers and all manners of produce.
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OPINION
July 16, 2009 | MEGHAN DAUM
Have you seen the billboards around town that say "Protect Your Right to Own a Pet"? They show a child hugging a puppy and provide a website, exposeanimalrights.com, flanked by international "no" symbols (a circle with a slash though it) containing the initials PETA (People for the Ethical Treatment of Animals) and HSUS (Humane Society of the United States). When I first passed one a couple of weeks ago, I was confused.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 14, 2013 | By Betsy Sharkey, Los Angeles Times Film Critic
Many documentaries steeped in social or political issues get very insistent and often very noisy in expressing a point of view. Michael Moore is of course the model for effective, engaging and defiantly in-your-face activism in this arena. In contrast, "The Ghosts in Our Machine," a heartfelt meditation on animal rights, comes at you as a whisper. It depends on the persuasive powers of creatures great and small - in their natural habitat or in cages - to argue that we stop using them for food, clothing, research and entertainment.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 13, 1991
Maybe I heard wrong or misunderstood what the lady from an "animal rights" group said on TV. Did she say that the group was against the San Diego Zoo's breeding program for the endangered Asian elephants because the breeding program is cruel to the elephants? How naive of me--I always thought extinction was the most cruel thing for a species. ANTHONY T. DUNN, San Diego
WORLD
July 20, 2011 | By Jonathan Kaiman, Los Angeles Times
Animal rights activists in Beijing are directing their attention away from fur farms, dog meat and zoos toward a less likely target in China: a rodeo. A coalition of 68 Chinese animal rights groups has called for the cancellation of Rodeo China, a Sino-U.S. cultural exchange event scheduled for October at the National Stadium, also known as the Bird's Nest. In a letter last month to the Chinese People's Assn. for Friendship With Foreign Countries, a government group teamed with the event's U.S. organizers, the rights groups condemned rodeo as a cruel sport that even Americans deem abusive and unpopular.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 8, 2013 | By Inkoo Kang
"Speciesism: The Movie" feels like, and is, a product of youth. Director Mark Devries began making his awkwardly titled first-person documentary in college, and its tone is so painfully earnest it might well have begun as a class project. Heavily influenced by PETA's messaging and inflammatory tactics - the first half-hour is practically an ode to the animal rights organization - the film is more polarizing than persuasive. Devries initially models himself after Michael Moore, affecting a gee-whiz naiveté that's both grating and implausible.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 6, 1989
May I quote: "Frankly, I don't shed a tear when I hear a lab has been broken into." Me, too! Hooray for animal rights groups! They speak up for the billions of animals wasted by the "good old boy" researchers. Methinks the researchers, and their system of grants, are nervous. Reminds me of Congress. RUTH UNGER Los Angeles
ENTERTAINMENT
November 8, 2013 | By Inkoo Kang
"Speciesism: The Movie" feels like, and is, a product of youth. Director Mark Devries began making his awkwardly titled first-person documentary in college, and its tone is so painfully earnest it might well have begun as a class project. Heavily influenced by PETA's messaging and inflammatory tactics - the first half-hour is practically an ode to the animal rights organization - the film is more polarizing than persuasive. Devries initially models himself after Michael Moore, affecting a gee-whiz naiveté that's both grating and implausible.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 24, 2013 | By Carla Rivera
Activists supporting liberation of all animals from captivity planned to rally in downtown Los Angeles on Saturday. Participants were expected to gather at Pershing Square at about noon and march along Broadway and Spring streets to Grand Park across from City Hall. Organizers said marchers will wear blindfolds that will be simultaneously removed as they declare "Our eyes are open to their pain. " The event is set to coincide with similar demonstrations in 33 cities around the world as part of International March for Animal Liberation.
WORLD
August 11, 2013 | By Kate Linthicum
LUJAN, Argentina - Manu Peclat, a tourist from Brazil, had already fed vegetables to elephants, thrown fish to seals and posed for pictures with two white tigers. Now it was time for the bears. A zookeeper unlocked a gate and led Peclat and a few other visitors inside. After trading chunks of raw sweet potato for pesos, the keeper roused 3-year-old Gordo from his slumber. The brown bear languidly lumbered over. Peclat held out his hand and Gordo gently gobbled up the snacks.
WORLD
April 1, 2013 | Lauren Frayer
The horses trot softly across sandy terrain and scrubby oak brush on Spain's central plateau, their riders listening for a rustle in the leaves, searching for a patch of wiry black fur betrayed by the sun. Finally, the hunters spot their prey. Ranch owner Ramiro Maura breaks the silence. "Venga! Arriba!" Maura screams -- "Come! Up here!" The riders yank their reins in unison, aim their spears and urge their horses up steep terrain laced with shriveled tree roots and boulders.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 20, 2013 | By Christine Mai-Duc, Los Angeles Times
Pat Derby could coax Willie the bear with a handful of jelly beans, make Christopher the cougar twitch his tail on command, and even kissed Rijo the tiger. But when it came to Walt Disney, she had less patience. Derby, a Hollywood animal trainer turned animal rights activist, once walked out on him in the middle of filming for "Disney's Wonderful World of Color" after he subjected her bear cub to two hours of retakes under the hot studio lights. She always got along better with animals than people, anyway, she often said.
OPINION
December 2, 2012
Re "No more curtain calls for elephants," Editorial, Nov. 26 The L.A. City Council's proposed ban on elephants in traveling shows, which The Times supports, is really based on the rhetoric of animal rights activists who oppose all animals in captivity and in entertainment. At a recent City Council committee hearing, so-called experts who are known animal activists were allowed to provide extensive testimony, while veterinary experts from Ringling Bros. and Barnum & Bailey were given mere minutes to make public comments.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 19, 2012 | By Steven Zeitchik, This post has been updated. See below for details.
With a computer-generated tiger at the center of the upcoming "Life of Pi," a controversy over live animals is brewing on a different holiday release. Wranglers in New Zealand have complained that as many as 27 animals have died as a result of conditions on the set of "The Hobbit: An Unexpected Journey," according to the Associated Press. The wranglers said that a series of sinkholes and other perils on farms made the conditions a “death trap” for the animals.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 29, 2012 | By Nicole Santa Cruz, Los Angeles Times
On behalf of the animal rights group PETA, an Irvine woman is asking the city to erect a memorial at the street corner where 1,600 pounds of fish died this month when a container truck crashed into two other vehicles. Dina Kourda, a volunteer with People for the Ethical Treatment of Animals, wrote to the Irvine Public Works Department to request that a sign be placed at Walnut and Yale avenues to honor the lives of the fish - believed to be saltwater bass - lost in the accident. The fish had been stored in large tanks that cracked open as a result of the Oct. 11 accident.
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