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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 24, 2000 | By MARTHA L. WILLMAN,
Two years after authorizing a plan to implant identity microchips in pets, Los Angeles city officials have yet to implement the program--even though it could potentially save thousands of animals from being euthanized. The program, mandated by the City Council in January 1998, calls for electronically tagging all dogs and cats adopted out of the city's six shelters.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 4, 2000
A building that temporarily housed a Los Angeles police station could be remodeled and used as an animal shelter to relieve overcrowding at the busy South-Central shelter, according to a plan approved Monday by the City Council's Public Safety Committee. The three-acre site on St. Andrews Place, formerly the LAPD's temporary 77th Division facility, could accommodate up to 200 kennels, officials said.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 19, 1996 | HUGO MARTIN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The good news is that after more than a year with only one veterinarian to care for the 74,000 animals that come through Los Angeles shelters each year, the Animal Regulation Department hired a second vet last week. The bad news is that he quit the next day. "He was really not here long enough for me to get used to," said Dena Mangiamele, the department's lone vet. "What are you going to do?" Mangiamele said that Grover H.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 29, 2000
Taking steps to fix "deplorable" conditions in the South-Central Los Angeles animal shelter, the City Council on Tuesday agreed to consider expanding the facility and its staff. "If it were not for the serious crisis that engulfs the city regarding Rampart, I dare say the conditions of the animal shelters throughout our city would occupy center stage of the life of this body and the city at large," said Councilman Mark Ridley-Thomas, who called on the council to act.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 6, 1998 | JILL LEOVY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
They flutter from telephone poles all over the city: homemade fliers with blurry photos of lost dogs or cats, posted by desperate pet lovers. Now, the Los Angeles Department of Animal Regulation believes that it may have a technological solution to the problem of wandering pets: computer chips. By implanting a chip the size of a grain of rice under the skin of a pet's neck, the department hopes to reunite lost pets and their owners and cut down on the number of animals that it must kill.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 4, 2000
A building that temporarily housed a Los Angeles police station could be remodeled and used as an animal shelter to relieve overcrowding at the busy South-Central shelter, according to a plan approved Monday by the City Council's Public Safety Committee. The three-acre site on St. Andrews Place, formerly the LAPD's temporary 77th Division facility, could accommodate up to 200 kennels, officials said.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 19, 1996 | HUGO MARTIN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
There is good news and bad news for the beleaguered Los Angeles Animal Regulation Department. The good news is that after more than a year with only one veterinarian to care for the 74,000 animals that come through the city shelters each year, the department hired a second vet last week. The bad news is that he quit the next day. "He was really not here long enough for me to get used to," said Dena Mangiamele, the department's lone vet. "What are you going to do?" Mangiamele said that Grover H.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 22, 1998 | SYLVIA L. OLIANDE
In response to an early morning dog attack that severely injured an animal regulation employee last November, the City Council agreed Wednesday to study new policies that would give swing and graveyard employees better protection when working in city kennels.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 29, 2000
Taking steps to fix "deplorable" conditions in the South-Central Los Angeles animal shelter, the City Council on Tuesday agreed to consider expanding the facility and its staff. "If it were not for the serious crisis that engulfs the city regarding Rampart, I dare say the conditions of the animal shelters throughout our city would occupy center stage of the life of this body and the city at large," said Councilman Mark Ridley-Thomas, who called on the council to act.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 15, 1998 | SYLVIA L. OLIANDE
Pet identification in the city of Los Angeles went high-tech Wednesday, as the City Council approved a program that would electronically tag pets to better reunite them with their owners. By implanting an electronic device the size of a rice kernel into the scruff of a pet's neck, animal regulation officials are hoping to reduce the number of dogs and cats euthanized because shelters are unable to find their owners.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 24, 2000 | By MARTHA L. WILLMAN,
Two years after authorizing a plan to implant identity microchips in pets, Los Angeles city officials have yet to implement the program--even though it could potentially save thousands of animals from being euthanized. The program, mandated by the City Council in January 1998, calls for electronically tagging all dogs and cats adopted out of the city's six shelters.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 22, 1998 | SYLVIA L. OLIANDE
In response to an early morning dog attack that severely injured an animal regulation employee last November, the City Council agreed Wednesday to study new policies that would give swing and graveyard employees better protection when working in city kennels.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 15, 1998 | SYLVIA L. OLIANDE
Pet identification in the city of Los Angeles went high-tech Wednesday, as the City Council approved a program that would electronically tag pets to better reunite them with their owners. By implanting an electronic device the size of a rice kernel into the scruff of a pet's neck, animal regulation officials are hoping to reduce the number of dogs and cats euthanized because shelters are unable to find their owners.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 6, 1998 | JILL LEOVY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
They flutter from telephone poles all over the city: homemade fliers with blurry photos of lost dogs or cats, posted by desperate pet lovers. Now, the Los Angeles Department of Animal Regulation believes that it may have a technological solution to the problem of wandering pets: computer chips. By implanting a chip the size of a grain of rice under the skin of a pet's neck, the department hopes to reunite lost pets and their owners and cut down on the number of animals that it must kill.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 19, 1996 | HUGO MARTIN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The good news is that after more than a year with only one veterinarian to care for the 74,000 animals that come through Los Angeles shelters each year, the Animal Regulation Department hired a second vet last week. The bad news is that he quit the next day. "He was really not here long enough for me to get used to," said Dena Mangiamele, the department's lone vet. "What are you going to do?" Mangiamele said that Grover H.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 19, 1996 | HUGO MARTIN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
There is good news and bad news for the beleaguered Los Angeles Animal Regulation Department. The good news is that after more than a year with only one veterinarian to care for the 74,000 animals that come through the city shelters each year, the department hired a second vet last week. The bad news is that he quit the next day. "He was really not here long enough for me to get used to," said Dena Mangiamele, the department's lone vet. "What are you going to do?" Mangiamele said that Grover H.
MAGAZINE
April 21, 1996 | Ajay Sahgal
* Veterinarians in Los Angeles County: 757 * Number of holistic vet: 4 * Animal shelters in Los Angeles County: 19 * Number of animals admitted in 1995: Approximately 100,000 * Shelters run by the Society for the Prevention of Cruelty to Animals: 2 * Number of dogs admitted by SPCA shelters in 1995: 4,337 * Number of cats: 3,391 * Number of SPCA dogs euthanized: 587 * Number of cats: 263 * Number of Los Angeles pet cemeteries: 3
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 14, 1997
Martha Willman's foster felines article ("Cat's Cradles," Aug. 23) certainly illustrates the need for volunteer foster parents for newborn kittens at animal shelters throughout Los Angeles. However, Willman writes that the Los Angeles City Animal Services program "is the first of its kind in Los Angeles," which is inaccurate. Since its inception in 1877, well before the birth of city animal services, the Society for the Prevention of Cruelty to Animals Los Angeles (spcaLA) was unofficially fostering newborns, as well as housing abused and battered people and children.
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