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WORLD
May 29, 2007 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Traders in the Indian-held portion of Kashmir handed over truckloads of animal skins and fur garments to wildlife officials. The skins belonged to tigers, leopards, snow leopards and other rare animals. A 1997 law provides for up to six years in prison for killing the animals. More than 200 traders are expected to hand over more than 800,000 skins and fur garments, stocks they held when the ban was imposed, officials said. It took nearly 10 years to get $2.3 million in payments approved.
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WORLD
May 29, 2007 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Traders in the Indian-held portion of Kashmir handed over truckloads of animal skins and fur garments to wildlife officials. The skins belonged to tigers, leopards, snow leopards and other rare animals. A 1997 law provides for up to six years in prison for killing the animals. More than 200 traders are expected to hand over more than 800,000 skins and fur garments, stocks they held when the ban was imposed, officials said. It took nearly 10 years to get $2.3 million in payments approved.
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NEWS
August 20, 1992 | From Associated Press
As U.S. officials visited Somalia on Wednesday to prepare for a massive relief airlift, people in the starving Horn of Africa nation were eating animal skins in a desperate effort to survive. One family in Gofgadoot, 150 miles northwest of the Somalian capital, Mogadishu, sat around a boiling pot where animal skin and leaves were stewing. On the ground behind them lay a toddler who had died Tuesday morning.
HOME & GARDEN
December 21, 2006 | Bettijane Levine, Times Staff Writer
BELIEVE it or not, there is a case being made for using certain animal skins as rugs. They are gaining favor as floor decor to the dismay of those who believe neither hide nor hair of any animal should be used in the home by anyone other than its original owner. But interior designers and retailers say there is new acceptance of cowhide and sheepskin rugs, especially in exotic patterns, unusual colors and different shapes. "It's organic. People like the texture and feel of it.
NEWS
April 27, 1986 | MICHAEL PARKS, Times Staff Writer
An 18-year-old, Mswati III, became king of the remote African mountain nation of Swaziland on Saturday and, addressing his subjects for the first time, promised his people a reign of "unity, happiness and prosperity." "I have pledged myself to your service, and throughout my life and with all my heart, I shall try to be worthy of your trust," Mswati said as he began his rule over one of the world's smallest kingdoms, a landlocked country of 600,000 wedged between South Africa and Mozambique.
NEWS
December 25, 1989 | RON HARRIS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
It's Christmas, and the fur is flying here in more ways than one. For years, glitzy, ritzy Aspen, the star-studded town of the $100 tip, where the average home sells for $1 million and where celebrities from Prince and Don Johnson to Barbara Walters and Jack Nicholson live and play, has been a swell place to wear a fur coat. The temperatures plunge below freezing and expensive clothes are more the rule than the exception.
NEWS
February 19, 1992 | Associated Press
Two Americans protested the fur business Tuesday by stripping down to their underwear and marching through a crowded shopping district carrying a banner reading, "We'd Rather Go Naked Than Wear Fur." Ignoring the chilly 46-degree weather, Dan Matthews and Julia Sloane of the Washington-based People for the Ethical Treatment of Animals walked for an hour outside Sunshine 60, Japan's tallest building.
HOME & GARDEN
December 21, 2006 | Bettijane Levine, Times Staff Writer
BELIEVE it or not, there is a case being made for using certain animal skins as rugs. They are gaining favor as floor decor to the dismay of those who believe neither hide nor hair of any animal should be used in the home by anyone other than its original owner. But interior designers and retailers say there is new acceptance of cowhide and sheepskin rugs, especially in exotic patterns, unusual colors and different shapes. "It's organic. People like the texture and feel of it.
BUSINESS
December 6, 1990 | MICHAEL PARRISH, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Harvey M. Fischer was shopping in a Glendale mall when he noticed the distinctive, bold pattern of python skin on a pair of cowboy boots in a store window. As reptile curator at the Los Angeles Zoo, Fischer knew that some species of the great snake are endangered and that under state law all python skins are banned from import into California. "How dare they keep doing something like this?" he asked himself. Then he complained to the Los Angeles County District Attorney's office.
NEWS
March 16, 1990 | KATHRYN BOLD, Kathryn Bold is a regular contributor to Orange County Life
Come next ski season, the classic fur parka will be one step closer to extinction. Nils Skiwear of Fountain Valley has removed fur collars from its entire 1990-91 line of ski jackets to avoid a fur fight with animal rights activists. "It was a hard decision. We had a group of jackets with fur collars that were extremely successful, and fur had a lot to do with the appeal of the product," says Richard Leffler, executive vice president of Nils.
NEWS
March 2, 2001 | VALLI HERMAN-COHEN, TIMES SENIOR FASHION WRITER
Protectors of a rare Tibetan antelope are disappointed by the sentence given to smugglers of contraband shahtoosh shawls made from the animal's ultra-fine wool. In the first U.S. felony case to be prosecuted over illegal trade in shahtoosh, a U.S. District Court judge in New Jersey last week handed Navarang Exports of Bombay, India, five years' probation and a $5,000 fine, though the maximum fine allowed is $500,000.
NEWS
November 1, 2000 | CINDY SKRZYCKI, WASHINGTON POST
Congress has called out the dogs on this one. Literally. Sen. William V. Roth Jr. (R-Del.) called on his Saint Bernards, Wilhelm IV and Tsunami last month in a bid to end the importation of dog and cat fur for use in apparel and other items. "We want this horrible practice to end, and today we are asking Congress to pass the Tariff Suspension and Trade Act of 2000 and help save our friends," according to a news release put out in the dogs' names.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 1, 2000 | KRISTINA SAUERWEIN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
At age 17, Geoffrey Kerns says he has lost count of how many times he has been arrested. But each time he is handcuffed or detained in juvenile hall, he says his voice for animals grows louder. "Not many people speak for the animals," said Geoffrey, who opposes cruelty toward animals, which he believes encompasses slaughtering for meat and skinning for clothing and accessories. "I am willing to do whatever it takes. Getting arrested is just a part of the cause."
NEWS
August 29, 2000 | VALLI HERMAN-COHEN, TIMES SENIOR FASHION WRITER
Like the leopard coat and the ivory bracelet before it, the shahtoosh shawl is threatening the survival of an endangered species. But as the Tibetan antelope that is killed for its wool nears extinction, an international crackdown is underway against trafficking in the shawls. The first U.S. criminal prosecution involving the illegal sale of smuggled shawls occurred in New Jersey last month.
NEWS
December 10, 1999
I have to tell you how disgusted and appalled I was to read "Cover Story" (Dec. 1). Rather ironic to put a piece about dead animal covers for books in the "Living" section. What a mixed message Mr. Kavin gives. How can you teach children to love and appreciate animals when you cover the book with the skins of dead ones? I may be wrong, but I thought elephants were an endangered species. And what a tasteless "joke" about not putting the skin of a collie on "Lassie" because "the collies were reluctant to cooperate."
BUSINESS
November 19, 1996 | JIRAPORN WONGPAITHOON, ASSOCIATED PRESS
"Let's trade for fat dogs, lazy dogs and dogs that don't bark," blare the loudspeakers on a pickup truck. The dog traders of northeastern Thailand are on the prowl again for man's best friend, looking for dogs to kill for meat and hides. The trucks carry large steel cages and a supply of plastic buckets, the bounty for dogs. When there aren't enough strays to satisfy demand, the trucks go out to buy pet dogs from local farmers for one bucket for an average-size dog.
SPORTS
March 3, 1990 | RICH ROBERTS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
As the two undercover game wardens talked with the owner of a taxidermy shop in a small Northern California town, they froze. In walked the local, uniformed warden--the last person they wanted to see. The first two wardens--a man and a woman--were pretending to be fur buyers. They suspected the taxidermist was dealing in illegal pelts. The undercover male warden knew the local warden, who also was friendly with the taxidermist. Their sons played on the same soccer team.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 9, 1988
The first U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service inspector ever convicted of corruption was sentenced Friday to a year in prison and 2,000 hours of community service for illegally importing more than 50,000 exotic reptiles from Colombia.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 30, 1995
Two men in business suits who were firing shots as they drove through a neighborhood were arrested for that and for having a bullet scarred bobcat skin in the car, police said Wednesday. Officers stopped the car about 4:30 p.m. Tuesday after a resident reported seeing men in suits driving a black Dodge Intrepid along Stewart Street and firing shots at a house. Lt. Dan Johnson said police found a .
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 11, 1993 | JAMES MAIELLA JR., SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
A Thousand Oaks man was sentenced Monday to six months in a halfway house, three years probation and a $2,000 fine for selling two leopard skins and two Bengal tiger skins to an undercover federal agent. Philip Alvidrez, 35, the broker in a deal that brought the pelts from Pakistan and India, will begin serving his sentence on June 7, Assistant U.S. Atty. Nathan J. Hochman said. Agents from the U.S.
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