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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 12, 2001
I am outraged that the U.S. National Toxicology Program is celebrating its 500th test on innocent creatures (Feb. 7). We human beings spend countless dollars developing toxic chemicals and then spend countless more dollars, not to mention millions of lives, testing those same chemicals. To rejoice in the horrors of vivisection is not only heartless, it is frightening. We have come to a point where nonhuman life has no value beyond the funding that the scientists are greedily accepting in return for their premeditated torture and murder of those helpless beings.
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NEWS
March 12, 2013 | By Susan Denley
European Union regulators on Monday announced a ban on the import or sale of any cosmetics with ingredients tested on animals. The EU banned animal testing of finished cosmetics in 2004, and animal testing of ingredients in 2008. The new ban, effective immediately, puts pressure on other parts of the world to ban animal testing of cosmetics too. [New York Times] Designers frequently give celebrities clothing for free, just for the publicity value of having the clothes worn by prominent walking billboards.
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BUSINESS
January 18, 2007 | From Reuters
Pomegranate juice maker Pom Wonderful, which became a target of animal rights activists because of research the company did into its juice's medical benefits, said Wednesday that it had stopped testing on animals. "Pom Wonderful pomegranate juice has ceased all animal testing, and we have no plans to do so in the future," Lynda and Stewart Resnick wrote to all Pom retailers by e-mail or post Wednesday. The Resnicks own Los Angeles-based Roll International Corp.
SCIENCE
June 22, 2012 | By Thomas H. Maugh II
A single injection of an experimental drug designed to silence the gene that produces the mutant huntingtin protein in Huntington's disease can provide long-lasting relief from the condition, studies in rats and monkeys show. The infusion not only temporarily blocks production of the mutant protein, but also allows the body to clean up some of the huntingtin that has already accumulated, leading to a "huntingtin holiday" that can persist as long as nine months, UC San Diego researchers reported this week.
BUSINESS
July 1, 1999 | From Reuters
After years of debate and negotiation, Procter & Gamble Co. on Wednesday said it was ending the use of animal tests for about 80% of its products. Amy Neltner, a spokeswoman for the consumer products giant, said the decision does not cover the company's food and pharmaceutical products, but P&G is moving toward eliminating all animal testing and will do so "as soon as science allows."
BUSINESS
January 27, 1993 | MICHAEL FLAGG, TIMES STAFF WRITER
InVitro International Inc. said Tuesday that independent research shows that its latest test for evaluating the effectiveness of sunscreens is 93% accurate. The test is meant to complement and in some cases supplant the use of animals in evaluating sunscreens. The product-testing unit of San Francisco's Shaklee U.S. Inc. did the first independent research on Suntex recently and found that it agreed with human test results 93% of the time.
NEWS
October 12, 1989 | JOANNA MILLER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
An Oxnard woman who helped organize an animal rights demonstration at the Procter & Gamble Co. plant this week finds herself in a politically touchy position today. As newly installed president of Oxnard Republican Women, Beverly McGrath says she will be in charge of a campaign to reelect Assemblyman Tom McClintock, the Thousand Oaks Republican who supports animal testing and opposes an Assembly bill that bans the use of animals for cosmetic and household product testing.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 10, 1990 | MAJA RADEVICH
Carrying signs with sayings such as "Imagine . . . A Cruelty Free Procter & Gamble," along with pictures of bloodied animals, about 40 activists protested Tuesday outside Procter & Gamble's Oxnard plant. Aside from a few honks from passing cars, the demonstration was quiet and peaceful. Although no arrests were made locally, six people were arrested in Cincinnati, Ohio, during Tuesday's national demonstration.
NEWS
May 22, 1990 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
University researchers opposed legislation that would outlaw certain animal tests for product safety. "Animal zealots have flooded the Legislature, the press and the public with an intimidating deluge of mail, propaganda and information," Tom Hamm, director of animal research at Stanford University, told a Capitol news conference. "(But) in many instances, there are no adequate alternatives to animal testing and research to allay human pain, suffering, disease and injury."
ENTERTAINMENT
September 18, 1998 | PHILIP BRANDES
Do human rights apply when the being in question isn't human, but sentient nonetheless? In its West Coast premiere at the Odyssey Theatre, Mark Medoff's thoughtful, issue-oriented "Gila" poses new moral dilemmas about animal testing in medical research. The animal in question is Graham (Garon Michael), a gorilla who has mastered a 400-word sign language vocabulary. He's caught between laboratory director Dr.
HEALTH
October 10, 2011 | By Amber Dance, Special to the Los Angeles Times
The makers of Botox have been celebrating — and no, it's not because they found a better way to smooth wrinkles. The company, Allergan Inc. of Irvine, announced in June that the Food and Drug Administration approved its new method to test Botox's potency. Instead of having to test every batch on live animals, it can now run a test on cells in a lab dish. It took 10 years for Allergan scientists to perfect the new test. If it's approved in all the countries where Botox is sold, Allergan expects to eliminate the need for at least 95% of its animal testing within three years.
OPINION
August 16, 2011
As money woes strain the city's resources, Los Angeles officials have been engaged in a continuing and important discussion: What are the responsibilities the city handles best itself? And what are those the city can, and should, contract out? Some are obvious: The city should run its own police department, for instance. Some are not so obvious. The latest to fall under scrutiny is the operation of animal shelters. There are six scattered across the city that are open to the public and that take in and adopt out thousands of unwanted and stray animals.
BUSINESS
June 10, 2007 | From Times Wire Services
Coca-Cola Co. will urge research firms and organizations it supports to avoid testing on animals after pressure from an animal rights group. PepsiCo Inc. established similar guidelines last month. Coca-Cola, the world's largest soft drink maker, had funded taste tests on rats at Virginia Commonwealth University, according to People for the Ethical Treatment of Animals. Coca-Cola spokeswoman Kari Bjorhus said the company had discontinued funding the tests.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 6, 2006 | Carla Hall, Times Staff Writer
Animal rights activists accused UCLA officials Tuesday of painting a distorted picture of animal testing on campus and questioned its relevance. At a news conference in front of the administration building, Michael Budkie, head of a nonprofit group called Stop Animal Exploitation Now!, said that test animals are "so stressed they are mutilating their own bodies" and that UCLA sponsors research to attract grant money.
NATIONAL
March 14, 2006 | Jerry Hirsch, Times Staff Writer
The U.S. Department of Agriculture said Monday that a cow from an Alabama dairy farm had tested positive for mad cow disease, the third U.S. case of the bovine brain-wasting syndrome. The stricken animal was tested for bovine spongiform encephalopathy, or BSE, because it was a "downer," an animal that couldn't walk. The cow posed no risk to public health because it wasn't sent to a food processing plant, officials said.
BUSINESS
March 1, 2004 | From Associated Press
Chiron Corp. has sued an animal rights group, accusing the activists of waging a violent harassment campaign and supporting the man charged with detonating two pipe bombs at the biotechnology company's sprawling campus here. The suit, filed last week in Alameda County Superior Court, seeks to keep activists affiliated with Stop Huntingdon Animal Cruelty USA, known as SHAC USA, at least 50 feet away from Chiron property and 100 feet away from employees and their properties.
HEALTH
October 10, 2011 | By Amber Dance, Special to the Los Angeles Times
The makers of Botox have been celebrating — and no, it's not because they found a better way to smooth wrinkles. The company, Allergan Inc. of Irvine, announced in June that the Food and Drug Administration approved its new method to test Botox's potency. Instead of having to test every batch on live animals, it can now run a test on cells in a lab dish. It took 10 years for Allergan scientists to perfect the new test. If it's approved in all the countries where Botox is sold, Allergan expects to eliminate the need for at least 95% of its animal testing within three years.
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