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Animal Welfare

NATIONAL
October 13, 2008 | From Times Wire Reports
An animal welfare advocate says a wayward manatee rescued from Cape Cod waters died on the way to Florida. Chris Cutter of the International Fund for Animal Welfare says the juvenile male died outside Orlando. The cause of death will be investigated. The animal wandered into a harbor near Dennis, Mass. Wildlife officials who feared for his health in the chilly water decided to pull him out Saturday. Manatees, normally found off Florida and Georgia, stop eating if they get too cold.
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WORLD
October 7, 2008 | From Times Wire Reports
More than 370 penguins that mysteriously washed up on Brazil's equatorial beaches were flown south on a huge air force cargo plane and released closer to the frigid waters they call home, advocates said. Onlookers cheered as the young Magellanic penguins were set free on a beach in southern Brazil and scampered into the ocean, the International Fund for Animal Welfare said in a statement. It called the penguin release the largest in South America. The penguins were among nearly 1,000 that have washed up on Brazil's northeastern coast in recent months, said group spokesman Chris Cutter.
WORLD
February 26, 2008 | Robyn Dixon, Times Staff Writer
South Africa announced Monday that it would allow the killing of elephants as a population control, a move strongly condemned by animal welfare groups. Beginning in May, the government will lift a 13-year ban on elephant culls, usually carried out by shooting entire herds, including youngsters, from helicopters. The move could hurt the country's tourist industry, with animal welfare lobbies calling for a tourist boycott to protest culling.
OPINION
December 24, 2007
Re "Fed looks to rein in lenders," Dec. 19 Time was when banks earned whatever success they enjoyed through conservative investment of their assets to home buyers and others by way of mortgages and similar instruments. The key was the size of their assets. Now, in search of highly leveraged profits, banks are the borrowers, lending funds far in excess of what they have. And they borrow from sources that have borrowed from God-only-knows where, an endless chain across the world.
OPINION
December 24, 2007
Re "L.A.'s deep pockets give creatures comfort," Dec. 19 I take issue with the derisive tone of The Times' article on animal welfare organizations and their donors. The piece focused almost exclusively on how lavish the fundraising dinners are, without mentioning that most nonprofit organizations (including ones serving humans) have rich donors and lavish galas.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 19, 2007 | Carla Hall, Times Staff Writer
The elephant researcher stood in the living room of the sleekly modern Pacific Palisades home perched high on a hill. Slides of an African preserve flashed by on a screen. Elephants "are so social, so communicative, so intelligent," said Joyce Poole, who has dedicated her life to documenting and protecting pachyderms. It is a task that takes money, and the admiring audience was ready to help. "I'd like to put up $25,000," businessman Gil Michaels said.
NATIONAL
November 6, 2007 | Stephanie Simon, Times Staff Writer
She spent years as an outspoken antiabortion activist, and that cause remains dear to her. But these days, Karen Swallow Prior has a new passion: animal welfare. She wasn't sure, at first, that advocating for God's four-legged creatures would go over well on the campus of Liberty University, a fundamentalist Baptist institution founded by the Rev. Jerry Falwell.
NEWS
September 9, 2007 | Chris Tomlinson, Associated Press
For the farmers of Kenya, life is a constant contest for grass and water between their herds and the wild animals that share the land. Now they are waging a new struggle, this time against the international animal welfare lobby. Pleading poverty, the farmers want to open their land to wealthy fee-paying hunters. The advocacy groups are firmly opposed.
BUSINESS
July 15, 2007
We are clearly growing more aware of just how much animals must suffer before we can eat them ("Animal welfare issue boiling," July 2). However, we should make sure that we do not settle for some half-solution that appeases our conscience while failing to protect those we would eat. Although switching to "humane," "free-range" and "cage-free" products is admirable, animals will continue to suffer so long as we continue to mass-produce, confine and kill them. The only real answer is to go vegan.
BUSINESS
July 2, 2007 | Jerry Hirsch, Times Staff Writer
Veterinarian Bud Stuart was delighted when he was given a live lobster by a client as extra thanks for saving a dog -- at least until the Santa Barbara seafood lover thought about cooking it. Stuart put the lobster in the freezer, expecting the chill would anesthetize it. Yet, when he later held it above a boiling pot of water, it was still alive and pinching. The crustacean was tasty, but he now vows "never to bring another live lobster into this house.
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