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Animation Cels

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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 21, 1996 | NANCY HILL-HOLTZMAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Bradley Cooper bought his first piece of art Saturday--a $200 animation cel featuring characters from the Walt Disney film "The Rescuers." He's wanted it most of his life. "It was the first movie I ever saw," said Cooper, who saw it in 1977 when he was 3. The dealer who sold Cooper the cel--short for a painting on celluloid film--understands the craving, though he didn't have to wait until adulthood to satisfy it. As a boy, Arnold J.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 4, 2001 | PATRICIA WARD BIEDERMAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Ron Stark has a vanity license plate that reads "CEL DR." The plate doesn't lie. Stark was a pioneer and remains one of the few conservators to specialize in animation art. Animation cels--individual pieces of art on clear plastic created by the thousands to make animated films--were typically used once, then discarded. Today, surviving cels are treasured by collectors who count "Cinderella" and "101 Dalmatians" among the happiest landmarks of childhood.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 12, 1993 | REBECCA BRYANT, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Bill Blum never thought a cartoon would change his life. But a discovery 30 years ago has turned the onetime garbage collector into an avid art collector who keeps his valuable works locked in concrete safes and frequents Sotheby's auctions. Fresh out of high school and working as a Burbank city laborer, Blum was filling in on Saturday garbage truck detail when he discovered a trash barrel full of drawings and painted celluloid.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 20, 1998
The first Anifest, in 1972, was held around the backyard swimming pool of June Foray, best known as the voice of Rocky the flying squirrel on "The Bullwinkle Show." It has grown from a simple fund-raiser for the Hollywood chapter of ASIFA (they sold--and still sell--animation cels) into a full-scale annual convention. After nearly 10 years in the quieter confines of hotel conference rooms, ASIFA has returned to more public view with Anifest '98.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 27, 1991 | MICHAEL CONNELLY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Using private investigators and federal lawsuits, Warner Bros. has recovered more than 3,000 cartoon cels and background drawings, worth as much as $500,000, that were taken from its Sherman Oaks cartoon studio, the company said Thursday. Police were not called to investigate the alleged theft of the hand-painted works that were used in the filming of the "Tiny Toon Adventures" TV cartoons, and a criminal investigation may never take place. Instead, Warner Bros.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 6, 1990 | CHARLES SOLOMON, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Recent auctions of artwork from animated films in Los Angeles and New York City indicate that top prices are falling but that the number of buyers for mid-priced works is increasing.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 28, 1990 | DENNIS McDOUGAL
For 18 years, through half a dozen recessions, Howard Lowery has run something of a Mickey Mouse business in Burbank. "My experience of late, even with the bad news, is that people are continuing to buy animation art," said Lowery. "I think the greatest impact in the field of art collection is in Old Masters and Impressionists. You have to realize that that was a field that went up far too fast."
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 9, 1994 | ED BOND
More than 300 animation cels from classic Walt Disney Studios cartoons as well as some other rare art--worth about $2 million--will be put up for auction Sunday by collector Howard Lowery. "There are some first-rate pieces from a number of very important Disney films," Lowery said. "But what's really unique is some of the works from the more obscure cartoons."
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 20, 1990 | MICHAEL CONNELLY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A Studio City man has been indicted for allegedly selling cartoon cels of Bugs Bunny, Daffy Duck and others that were reported stolen from Warner Bros. and ended up in the hands of dealers across the country, authorities said Wednesday. Billy W. Carmen, 31, faces three counts of interstate transportation of stolen property and could face a maximum of 30 years in prison and $750,000 in fines if convicted, according to a federal indictment handed down in U.S. District Court in Los Angeles.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 20, 1998
The first Anifest, in 1972, was held around the backyard swimming pool of June Foray, best known as the voice of Rocky the flying squirrel on "The Bullwinkle Show." It has grown from a simple fund-raiser for the Hollywood chapter of ASIFA (they sold--and still sell--animation cels) into a full-scale annual convention. After nearly 10 years in the quieter confines of hotel conference rooms, ASIFA has returned to more public view with Anifest '98.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 23, 1998 | RICHARD KAHLENBERG, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Times have changed for budding movie animators. These days a child can begin learning the craft as young as 9, and those who hang in and build an impressive portfolio of drawings can, by 18, find entry-level jobs with Valley companies. Education and industry experts agree it's never too early to begin developing a youth's artistic and craft skills, so Burbank's Creative Arts Center has begun offering animation classes. The next one, "Animation Cel Creation," for ages 9-12, meets Saturday.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 3, 1997 | CYNTHIA KELLY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The Columbia College of Physicians and Surgeons has used it to teach first-year medical students about the nervous system. Government and lobbyist groups have used it to train staffers about the legislative process. Aspiring citizens have studied it to learn the Constitution. It is "Schoolhouse Rock"--and it's not just for kids anymore. It's also not just a cartoon anymore.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 21, 1996 | NANCY HILL-HOLTZMAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Bradley Cooper bought his first piece of art Saturday--a $200 animation cel featuring characters from the Walt Disney film "The Rescuers." He's wanted it most of his life. "It was the first movie I ever saw," said Cooper, who saw it in 1977 when he was 3. The dealer who sold Cooper the cel--short for a painting on celluloid film--understands the craving, though he didn't have to wait until adulthood to satisfy it. As a boy, Arnold J.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 9, 1994 | ED BOND
More than 300 animation cels from classic Walt Disney Studios cartoons as well as some other rare art--worth about $2 million--will be put up for auction Sunday by collector Howard Lowery. "There are some first-rate pieces from a number of very important Disney films," Lowery said. "But what's really unique is some of the works from the more obscure cartoons."
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 12, 1993 | REBECCA BRYANT, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Bill Blum never thought a cartoon would change his life. But a discovery 30 years ago has turned the onetime garbage collector into an avid art collector who keeps his valuable works locked in concrete safes and frequents Sotheby's auctions. Fresh out of high school and working as a Burbank city laborer, Blum was filling in on Saturday garbage truck detail when he discovered a trash barrel full of drawings and painted celluloid.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 19, 1992 | CHARLES SOLOMON
Prices regularly topped expectations for original background paintings and specially created cels from Disney's record-breaking animated feature "Beauty and the Beast" at an auction conducted by Sotheby's in Hollywood on Saturday afternoon. All 249 lots found buyers for a sale total of $1,255,815.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 23, 1998 | RICHARD KAHLENBERG, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Times have changed for budding movie animators. These days a child can begin learning the craft as young as 9, and those who hang in and build an impressive portfolio of drawings can, by 18, find entry-level jobs with Valley companies. Education and industry experts agree it's never too early to begin developing a youth's artistic and craft skills, so Burbank's Creative Arts Center has begun offering animation classes. The next one, "Animation Cel Creation," for ages 9-12, meets Saturday.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 30, 1992 | DANIEL CERONE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The Walt Disney Co. is about to change the 'toon of the $100-million-a-year-trade in animation cels--the colorful paintings that, until Disney used a sophisticated new computer program to make its blockbuster "Beauty and the Beast," were the handmade individual building blocks of all cartoons from "Steamboat Willie" to "The Simpsons." The company is preparing to market cels from "Beauty" that were never used to make the movie itself.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 29, 1992 | CHARLES SOLOMON, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
After three years of record-breaking prices, the market for early black-and-white animated art has retrenched, but color material from feature Disney films continues to appreciate, two major sales Saturday in New York City indicate. The sale of the Herbert Black collection--a major cache of Disney animation--at Sotheby's on Saturday afternoon had been the object of considerable attention within the animation industry.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 30, 1992 | DANIEL CERONE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The Walt Disney Co. is about to change the 'toon of the $100-million-a-year-trade in animation cels--the colorful paintings that, until Disney used a sophisticated new computer program to make its blockbuster "Beauty and the Beast," were the handmade individual building blocks of all cartoons from "Steamboat Willie" to "The Simpsons." The company is preparing to market cels from "Beauty" that were never used to make the movie itself.
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