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January 10, 2010
JEFFREY KATZENBERG The chairman of the Walt Disney Studios from 1984 to'94, the 59-year-old Katzenberg founded DreamWorks SKG with Steven Spielberg and David Geffen in 1994. He has served as the chief executive officer of DreamWorks Animation since 2004. MICHAEL EISNER From 1984 to 2005, Eisner was the chief executive officer of the Walt Disney Co. In 2004, a shareholder rebellion led to his ouster as Disney's chairman. A year later, the 67-year-old Eisner founded the media company ROY E. DISNEY In 1984, Disney was part of an investor revolt that led to management changes at the studio his uncle founded.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 15, 2014 | By Oliver Gettell
The reformed supervillain Gru and his lovable yellow minions will reunite on the big screen in "Despicable Me 3," Universal Pictures announced Wednesday. The animated film is scheduled for release on June 30, 2017. The original "Despicable Me," which tells the story of a criminal mastermind (voiced by Steve Carell) who changes his ways after adopting three girls, was a surprise hit in 2010, earning more than $500 million worldwide. A follow-up, "Despicable Me 2," was the third-highest-grossing movie in the United States and Canada in 2013, generating $368 million in ticket sales; it earned $568 million more abroad.
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BUSINESS
October 12, 2010 | By Ben Fritz, Los Angeles Times
Starz Media has sold its Film Roman animation studio to a group of investors led by Scott Greenberg, a former president of the studio. Burbank-based Film Roman, best known for its two decades of work on "The Simpsons," will be merged with Bento Box Entertainment, another animation studio in Burbank started by Greenberg and two partners last year. The parties involved declined to comment on financial details. But according to one person familiar with the deal, the buyers paid $2 million to $4 million in cash for Film Roman and assumed liabilities and leases.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 10, 2013 | By Susan King
On Oct. 16, 1923, Walt Disney and his brother Roy began the Walt Disney Co. inauspiciously in the rear of a small office at the Holly-Vermont Realty in Los Angeles. It was there that the young brothers, who paid $10 a month for the modest space, began producing their live action/animated series of shorts known as the "Alice Comedies. " Ninety years later, Walt Disney Animation Studios is a slightly larger and more lucrative operation. Its 53rd animated feature, "Frozen," just knocked "The Hunger Games: Catching Fire" off its box office pedestal and has brought in more than $134 million domestically since its opening on Nov. 22. And the new animated short that plays in theaters with "Frozen," called "Get a Horse!
BUSINESS
March 10, 2006 | Lorenza Munoz, Times Staff Writer
DreamWorks Animation SKG Inc. reported fourth-quarter earnings Thursday that were cursed by a were-rabbit. Profit at the Glendale-based studio fell 67% on disappointing box-office receipts for the Oscar-winning "Wallace and Gromit: The Curse of the Were-Rabbit." The earnings included a one-time tax benefit as well as a $25-million charge to write down the value of "Wallace and Gromit."
BUSINESS
October 8, 1999 | JEFFREY GETTLEMAN
David Pritchard has been dismissed as chairman of Film Roman Inc., the animation studio that produces "The Simpsons" and other cartoons, the company said Thursday. Pritchard's removal angered some of the 330 employees at the North Hollywood animation boutique. Pritchard had been chairman since September 1997, and employees launched a petition drive to reinstate him. Pritchard's contract was up, and the board decided not to renew it, according to a board statement.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 20, 1992 | GREG BRAXTON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The Walt Disney Co.'s prestigious animation studios, which have been situated outside its Burbank headquarters since 1986, will return to the 44-acre lot under the first phase of the studio's planned $600-million expansion announced Tuesday. The new 240,000-square-foot feature animation studio will accommodate about 600 artists and spearhead the company's drive to re-establish the "college-type" atmosphere envisioned by Walt Disney, said Alan Epstein, vice president of Disney Development Co.
BUSINESS
June 29, 2000 | CLAUDIA ELLER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
20th Century Fox has shuttered its animation studio in Phoenix after a disastrous and costly six-year run that produced only two theatrical features. Fox's decision to close the unit had been under consideration for several months since layoffs of two-thirds of the operation's 320 employees in February. The remaining 60 staffers were let go Monday. Recently ousted Fox Filmed Entertainment Chairman Bill Mechanic had come under increased pressure from his bosses, News Corp.
BUSINESS
November 1, 2006 | Lorenza Munoz, Times Staff Writer
DreamWorks Animation's third-quarter earnings beat Wall Street expectations Tuesday, but analysts remained skeptical about how well the studio's animated release, "Flushed Away," would fare when it debuts this weekend. It's up against Walt Disney Co.'s family film, "The Santa Clause 3: The Escape Clause," starring Tim Allen. DreamWorks Chief Executive Jeffrey Katzenberg said it was hard nowadays to find a weekend that isn't jam-packed with family fare.
BUSINESS
October 29, 2011 | By Richard Verrier, Los Angeles Times
When the cat bandit "Puss in Boots" strides onto the big screen this weekend, Vanitha Rangaraju and her colleagues in Bangalore, India, will take special pride in the feline's starring role on the global stage. A spinoff of the hit "Shrek" movies, "Puss in Boots" represents a milestone for DreamWorks Animation and for the fledgling animation industry in the world's second most populous nation. The film, starring Antonio Banderas and Salma Hayek, marks the first time that the Glendale studio has relied on a crew of Indian animators to help produce a full-length feature film.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 19, 2013 | By Robert Lloyd, Los Angeles Times Television Critic
Although (and also because) they exist at the margins of what we talk about when we talk about television -- cable drama eating up most of that air, unfairly -- cartoons are among the most original, personal, forward-looking and also historically conscious works the medium has to offer. And much as advances in home-recording technology democratized music, better and more affordable animation software has helped open up TV, in its coat of many platforms, to new and independent voices.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 9, 2013 | By Amy Kaufman
“Finding Dory” may be undergoing a sea change as Pixar is taking a page from a little-seen whale documentary. The Walt Disney-owned animation studio is hard at work on "Finding Dory," a follow-up to the 2003 oceanic blockbuster "Finding Nemo. " But this spring, after Pixar executives viewed "Blackfish," which raises sharp questions about the health of whales in captivity, the studio decided to make substantial changes to the "Dory" script. According to Louie Psihoyos, who directed the Oscar-winning dolphin slaughter documentary “The Cove,” Pixar chief creative officer John Lasseter and “Dory” director Andrew Stanton sat down with “Blackfish” director Gabriela Cowperthwaite in April after seeing her movie.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 30, 2013 | By Richard Verrier
DreamWorks Animation is placing another bet in China. The Glendale studio is partnering with one of Asia's largest resort operators to bring its characters to  Macao. Dreamworks has signed a deal with Sands China, a subsidiary of the company that owns the Venetian and the Palazzo hotel-casinos in Las Vegas, to license its characters for a "DreamWorks Experience" at the Cotai Strip Resorts in Macao. The deal will give resort patrons various opportunities to see and mingle with Po, Shrek, Alex the lion, Hiccup and other characters from DreamWorks Animation movies.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 28, 2013 | By Richard Verrier
A company tied to the Los Angeles-based effects and animation studio Prana Studios has beat out other bidders to acquire Rhythm & Hues, the Oscar-winning visual effects house that filed for bankruptcy protection last month, a source close to the deal said Thursday night. The sale, terms of which were not disclosed, is subject to approval by the U.S. Bankruptcy Court at a hearing on Friday morning. If approved by the court, the sale would end a closely watched auction of one of Hollywood's best known visual effects companies whose financial woes have come to symbolize the challenges faced by an industry that was pioneered in California.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 17, 2013 | By Ellen Olivier
As emcee for the REDCAT Gala on Saturday, Jack Black said he had always hoped his debut at the multidisciplinary theater would include a performance of his “special post, post-modern interpretive dance,” complete with a “big dynamic gymnastic finale.” He pointed out, however, that instead of the usual stage at the Roy and Edna Disney/CalArts Theater, the venue that night had tables filling the room wall to wall. “I know that CalArts and REDCAT encourage artists to take risks,” Black said, “but I don't think that injuring the gala patrons is what they had in mind.” For those wondering how the star of “Bernie,” “School of Rock” and “Kung Fu Panda” came to host the gala, Black said he married into the CalArts family.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 22, 2013 | By Robert Lloyd, Los Angeles Times Television Critic
"Out There," which premieres Friday on IFC, is a rather lovely coming-of-age cartoon series from Ryan Quincy, who spent 14 years on "South Park. " It is nothing like that. Coming-of-age stories tend to be told by the misfits and weirdos and refuseniks of Normal Life, and this is no different. Our heroes are Chad (voiced by Quincy himself, whose slightly flat, unaffected delivery works well for this) and his strange new pal Chris (Justin Roiland), "the kind of friend who would shove you into the abyss and then jump right in after you. " Invisible to their peers except as occasional targets of mockery, they spend their days "off to the side, riding a wave of obscurity, observing the tableaux of teenage bliss.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 2, 1990 | GREG BRAXTON, Arts and entertainment reports from The Times, national and international news services and the nation's press
Cartoon Studio Draws a Crowd: DIC Enterprises, the animation studio that provides such Saturday morning fare as "The Wizard of Oz," "Camp Candy" and "Slimer! and the Real Ghostbusters," will begin conducting tours of its Burbank studios late this summer. The tour will be conducted by costumed actors portraying the company's cartoon characters.
NEWS
August 5, 2004 | Associated Press
George Lucas has teamed with Singapore to set up his first animation studio and production house outside the United States, government and corporate officials said. The Lucasfilm venture is expected to be up and running in Singapore by 2005, Micheline Chau, the company's chief operating officer, said Tuesday. "By having a base here in Singapore, we can create something new in animation, a style that will blend East and West and offer something not seen before," Lucas said in a recorded message.
BUSINESS
January 15, 2013 | By Richard Verrier, Los Angeles Times
When singer-songwriter Alicia Keys wanted to create an animated children's television series about the exploration of music, she turned to Burbank animation firm Bento Box for ideas. Bento's producers suggested an alternative: Instead of a TV show, how about an interactive storytelling app? That idea became "The Journals of Mama Mae and LeeLee," which was released through the iTunes store last fall for $3.99 and expands to Android mobile devices and tablets this month. Featuring original compositions from Keys, the animated series uses music, games, rewards and a journal to tell the story of a relationship between a young girl and a mystical grandmother.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 5, 2012
Fyodor Khitruk Animated Soviet version of 'Winnie the Pooh' Fyodor Khitruk, 95, a prominent Russian animator and director who created the Soviet Union's cartoon version of A.A. Milne's classic Winnie the Pooh stories, died Monday in Moscow, according to the Russian Animated Film Assn. The cause of death was not specified. Khitruk was best known for his work aimed at children, such as "Vinni-Pukh," as Winnie the Pooh is known in Russia. The cartoon series was produced between 1969 and 1972 and continues to air on television.
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