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Anita Addison

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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 30, 2004 | Mary Rourke, Times Staff Writer
Anita Addison, a producer and director who was one of the first African American women to hold a senior producer's position at a major television network, died Saturday in New York City, said David Byrd, her partner of more than eight years. She was 51. Addison, who lived in Los Angeles, was working on a television series in New York City when she became ill early last week. She was admitted to New York-Presbyterian hospital, where she died. The family declined to release the cause of death.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 30, 2004 | Mary Rourke, Times Staff Writer
Anita Addison, a producer and director who was one of the first African American women to hold a senior producer's position at a major television network, died Saturday in New York City, said David Byrd, her partner of more than eight years. She was 51. Addison, who lived in Los Angeles, was working on a television series in New York City when she became ill early last week. She was admitted to New York-Presbyterian hospital, where she died. The family declined to release the cause of death.
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ENTERTAINMENT
February 13, 1999 | GREG BRAXTON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Anita Addison, who left CBS' executive ranks last spring, is where she wants to be, spreading her wings in the arena where she feels most free and creative. Her latest project brings her back to the network as the director of Sunday's emotional drama "Deep in My Heart." "This is where I am and what I want to be doing now," said Addison, who is still getting used to her new bare-bones office at Paramount Studios where she has just set up shop.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 13, 1999 | GREG BRAXTON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Anita Addison, who left CBS' executive ranks last spring, is where she wants to be, spreading her wings in the arena where she feels most free and creative. Her latest project brings her back to the network as the director of Sunday's emotional drama "Deep in My Heart." "This is where I am and what I want to be doing now," said Addison, who is still getting used to her new bare-bones office at Paramount Studios where she has just set up shop.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 29, 1991 | NINA J. EASTON, Nina J. Easton is a Times staff writer
In the world of independent film, director Julie Dash is drawing a strong following as a fresh and innovative voice. Her ambitious "Daughters of the Dust"--set on the Sea Islands off the South Carolina coast in the early 1900s--earned top honors for its lush cinematography at this year's Sundance Film Festival. But Dash can't even get a Hollywood agent. In August, friends sponsored a screening of the film on Sony Pictures' Culver City lot--hoping for a turnout of influential insiders.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 17, 1996
I read with great interest Marco Perez's letter concerning the lack of people of color working in positions of authority at the major networks (Letters, Aug. 10). It must be very difficult for CBS' Anita Addison and NBC's Charisse McGhee-Lazarou being in the unenviable, Jackie Robinson-like position of being the "Only One" and having to deal with colleagues' racial and cultural blind spots on a daily basis. I guess the logos of the Big Three say it all. CBS' and ABC's have no color at all, and obviously the NBC peacock is multicolored merely for chromatic effect.
NEWS
July 21, 1996 | Ray Loynd
In her most serious role since "The Color Purple," Oprah Winfrey (right) plays the real-life, down-but-not-out single mother LaJoe Rivers in this burnished, gritty 1993 TV movie. She's a determined person who wages war on behalf of her kids from a squalid apartment in the Chicago housing project. Director Anita W. Addison doesn't flinch from the requisite violence but she doesn't exploit it either. Maya Angelou (left) plays LaJoe's equally gritty mother (ABC Thursday at 9 p.m.).
ENTERTAINMENT
August 10, 1996
Re: Kim Fleary's departure from ABC ("ABC Will Take New Risks, New Entertainment President Vows," Calendar, July 27, and "Briefly," Business, Aug. 3.) As a Latino, my family, children and friends still await the day when we can watch prime-time television that looks like America. Where ethnic homogeneity is not the rule of the day. Just when it looks like the networks are about to take one step forward we discover that they are all too often taking two steps back. Kim Fleary, ABC's vice president of comedy for years, and an African American, has been shown the door with the arrival of the Jamie Tarses regime.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 4, 1991 | STEVEN HERBERT, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The producers of a drama series scheduled to debut on NBC next Saturday criticized the network Friday for deciding this week to delete the opening scene in order to respond to what the network described as "certain constituencies . . . that would find elements of the opening dialogue offensive." They said that the scene in the "Sisters" pilot had been in NBC's hands for a year and had been approved for broadcast until objections were voiced by advertisers and affiliates.
NEWS
November 28, 1993 | SUSAN KING, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Oprah Winfrey is best known as the Emmy Award-winning host of her own daytime talk show. But she's also a critically acclaimed actress who received a best supporting actress nomination for her film debut in 1985's "The Color Purple." Winfrey also starred in the highly rated ABC miniseries "The Women of Brewster Place." Her latest acting project is the ABC movie "There Are No Children There," based on Alex Kotlowitz's nonfiction bestseller.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 29, 1991 | NINA J. EASTON, Nina J. Easton is a Times staff writer
In the world of independent film, director Julie Dash is drawing a strong following as a fresh and innovative voice. Her ambitious "Daughters of the Dust"--set on the Sea Islands off the South Carolina coast in the early 1900s--earned top honors for its lush cinematography at this year's Sundance Film Festival. But Dash can't even get a Hollywood agent. In August, friends sponsored a screening of the film on Sony Pictures' Culver City lot--hoping for a turnout of influential insiders.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 7, 2000 | KAREN GRIGSBY BATES, Karen Grigsby Bates is a Los Angeles-based correspondent for a national magazine
For the past few months, the NAACP and Hollywood's television industry have gone eyeball-to-eyeball over the issue of minority representation in television's ethnically sterile wasteland; on Wednesday, Hollywood blinked. NBC president Robert Wright announced that, rather than risk a threatened boycott of his network by minority viewers--something the NAACP's president, Kweisi Mfume, had threatened--the network that made "must-see TV" a household phrase, would diversify.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 10, 2001 | SUSAN KING, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Thirteen-year-old Lacey Conlan is trying to strike a serious pose for the photographer, but a smile keeps creeping across her face until she can't stop laughing. "I can't do serious!" she proclaims. Conlan has one of those thousand-kilowatt smiles that go on forever. And even while she was enduring months of radiation and chemotherapy last year at the City of Hope Cancer Center in Duarte for a rare brain tumor, she never lost her ability to smile.
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