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Anita O Day

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ENTERTAINMENT
April 1, 2000
Anita O'Day--the legendary jazz singer who, after a long illness, resumed her career a year ago with a series of Monday night appearances at the Atlas Supper Club--will shift to Tuesdays, performing three sets at the club between 8 and 11 p.m., accompanied by Marty Harris on piano, Jim DiJulio on bass and Jack LeCompte on drums. In addition to her standards, O'Day will perform new songs that she plans to record and prepare for her concert at the Montreal Jazz Festival in July.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 1, 2013 | By Don Heckman
Paul Smith, a jazz pianist, arranger-composer and music director for stars such as Sammy Davis Jr., Anita O'Day, Mel Torme, Ella Fitzgerald, Doris Day, the Andrews Sisters, Sarah Vaughan and Rosemary Clooney, has died. He was 91. Smith died of heart failure Saturday at the Torrance Memorial Medical Center, publicist Alan Eichler said. At 6 feet 5, with hands that easily spanned the piano keyboard well beyond octaves, Smith was an impressive sight on stage. Playing with a versatility comparable to that of Oscar Peterson and a harmonic richness similar to the work of Bill Evans, he was both a brilliant soloist and an accompanist who was highly praised by the many singers with whom he performed.
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ENTERTAINMENT
May 5, 1989 | A. JAMES LISKA
All of the familiar elements--save one--were in place at the Vine St. Bar & Grill Wednesday night when singer Anita O'Day opened a four-night stand with a quartet. Her asleep-at-the-wheel swing style, her insouciant scatting, her melismatic approach to each note--each was in solid evidence during her brief opening set. What was missing was the voice, that quality voice that once lifted O'Day an echelon or two above the other band singers, a voice that was likened to any number of bell-clear instruments.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 22, 2008 | Sheri Linden, Special to The Times
The great Anita O'Day, tough cookie and sublime jazz vocalist, receives a fitting tribute in this exuberant documentary, completed shortly before her death in 2006 at 87. Alive with improvisational energy and rejecting the conventional biographical format, the film pursues ideas and feelings rather than chronology as it scats through an archival wealth of interviews with O'Day and some of her most inspired performances. Friends and colleagues weigh in too and impresario George Wein, at whose Newport Jazz Festival O'Day delivered a transcendent and legendary performance.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 23, 1988 | JACK HAWN
After 80 or so albums and almost 55 years in the music profession, she sometimes is referred to as the "legendary" Anita O'Day. Her nightclub performances continue to draw praise, and now, unexpectedly, there is recognition from another industry. "A lawyer called and said one of my songs was going to be in some movie," she said matter-of-factly the other night before her closing show at Vine St. Bar & Grill.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 12, 1990 | DON HECKMAN
"The method doesn't change. You bring out a few tunes, you blow a few choruses, you bring in some of that nostalgia pitch, and you throw in a few songs from the '40s. Then you add a couple of things from today, songs that are like the standards, and that's it." Anita O'Day--who will make rare Orange County appearances Sunday at noon and 3 p.m.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 26, 1990 | DIRK SUTRO
Jazz singer Anita O'Day gave up city life in Hollywood eight years ago for a mobile home park in Hemet, but she ventures out for dates in jazz clubs. She opens five nights at Elario's in La Jolla on Wednesday night, her first appearance in the San Diego area. Touted by critics as one of the great jazz singers, O'Day, 71, gives a fairly down-to-earth assessment of her own abilities. "My voice is the same as it always was. I have no voice," she said.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 25, 2006 | Don Heckman, Special to The Times
Anita O'Day, who died Thursday at 87, was never just another big-band canary. That's not to say that she lacked the physical attributes to compete with the other Swing era vocalists -- frilly eye candy occasionally taking the microphone to offer jaunty riffs on the latest pop tunes -- who sat on stage with the Glenn Miller, Benny Goodman and Harry James ensembles.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 19, 1992 | DON HECKMAN, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Anita O'Day has never been accused of timidity--at least not when it comes to music. After 50-plus years in the business, virtually all of it as a prominent jazz singer, she does not tolerate musical sloppiness without raising a big-time fuss. "Oh, Anita can be blunt, all right," says saxophonist Gordon Brisker, who will lead the veteran artist's backup group Friday through Sunday at Maxwell's in Huntington Beach. "She definitely doesn't suffer fools too easily."
ENTERTAINMENT
May 13, 1989
I was appalled by A. James Liska's mean-spirited review of singer Anita O'Day (May 5). As a veteran of 50 years in show business and as one of the truly original jazz stylists of her time, O'Day deserves more consideration, even if there were rough edges on her opening set of opening night. To criticize her repertoire for its age is typical of American culture, which fails to venerate its living national treasures in its pursuit of commercial novelty. Did the reviewer expect to hear hip-hop from one of the few remaining pioneers of be-bop?
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 30, 2006
A memorial service for jazz singer Anita O'Day, who died Nov. 23, will be held at 1 p.m. Saturday at Hollywood Forever Cemetery, 6000 Santa Monica Blvd., Hollywood.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 25, 2006 | Don Heckman, Special to The Times
Anita O'Day, who died Thursday at 87, was never just another big-band canary. That's not to say that she lacked the physical attributes to compete with the other Swing era vocalists -- frilly eye candy occasionally taking the microphone to offer jaunty riffs on the latest pop tunes -- who sat on stage with the Glenn Miller, Benny Goodman and Harry James ensembles.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 24, 2006 | Dennis McLellan, Times Staff Writer
Anita O'Day, who shot to fame as a singer with drummer Gene Krupa's swing band in the early 1940s and became one of the most distinctive voices in the history of jazz, died Thursday. She was 87. O'Day died of cardiac arrest in a convalescent hospital in West Los Angeles, according to her manager, Robbie Cavalina. She was recovering from pneumonia and had been in declining health with Alzheimer's disease.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 1, 2000
Anita O'Day--the legendary jazz singer who, after a long illness, resumed her career a year ago with a series of Monday night appearances at the Atlas Supper Club--will shift to Tuesdays, performing three sets at the club between 8 and 11 p.m., accompanied by Marty Harris on piano, Jim DiJulio on bass and Jack LeCompte on drums. In addition to her standards, O'Day will perform new songs that she plans to record and prepare for her concert at the Montreal Jazz Festival in July.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 4, 2000
Anita O'Day returns to the Atlas Supper Club, Wiltern Building, 3769 Wilshire Blvd., for a Feb. 14 Valentine's Day performance and will continue Mondays indefinitely as she prepares a new album of songs she has not previously recorded. She will perform three sets from 8 to 11 p.m., accompanied by Marty Harris on piano, Jim DiJulie on bass and Jack LeCompte on drums. Information: (213) 380-8400.
MAGAZINE
July 18, 1999 | Ed Leibowitz
It took considerable persuasive power for Alan Eichler to raise Anita O'Day from the dead. On Christmas Eve, 1996, he got a call from a hospital. They'd found his name and number on a piece of paper in her wallet. "She was tied down by her hands and feet like an animal," says Eichler, the Hollywood manager/publicist for O'Day, Patti Page, Ruth Brown, Nellie Lutcher and other chanteuses in twilight. "She was medicated and drugged. They had taken her teeth out. They said she had blood poisoning.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 28, 1987 | LEONARD FEATHER, Terry Atkinson
"Jazz on a Summer's Day." Sony. $29.95. This is Bert Stern's exquisitely photographed memento of the sounds, crowds, streets, children, waters, birds and boats (during the America's Cup race) at Newport's 1958 jazz festival.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 22, 2008 | Sheri Linden, Special to The Times
The great Anita O'Day, tough cookie and sublime jazz vocalist, receives a fitting tribute in this exuberant documentary, completed shortly before her death in 2006 at 87. Alive with improvisational energy and rejecting the conventional biographical format, the film pursues ideas and feelings rather than chronology as it scats through an archival wealth of interviews with O'Day and some of her most inspired performances. Friends and colleagues weigh in too and impresario George Wein, at whose Newport Jazz Festival O'Day delivered a transcendent and legendary performance.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 20, 1999 | CADONNA M. PEYTON, ASSOCIATED PRESS
Anita O'Day gingerly slips a black glove on her right hand before taking the stage at an art deco supper club, its dim lights casting a glow over a crowd that has come to hear the scat-singing jazz legend. She gently taps her foot to the sound of the beat and throws her hips back and forth, then casually nods her head at the pianist before easing into a melody.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 6, 1999
Jazz legend Anita O'Day will begin a weekly series of performances at Atlas supper club, adjacent to the Wiltern Theatre, 3760 Wilshire Blvd., beginning tonight. O'Day, sidelined by illness two years ago, has now resumed her career. O'Day will perform sets intermittently beginning at 8 p.m. each Tuesday at Atlas as she prepares for a headline concert at the JVC Jazz Festival at New York's Avery Fisher Hall on June 2. O'Day, who will celebrate her 80th birthday Oct.
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