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Ann Blyth

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NEWS
October 14, 1994 | LIBBY SLATE, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES; Libby Slate is a regular contributor to The Times.
When John Raitt and Ann Blyth sing together for the first time Sunday in the "Show of the Month" series at the Academy Plaza Theatre, they will bring a total of more than 100 years of musical film and theater performing experience to the stage. Raitt, 77, first made his mark in 1945 as rough-hewn barker Billy Bigelow in Rodgers and Hammerstein's Broadway classic "Carousel," after replacing star Alfred Drake as Curly in the national company of "Oklahoma!"
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ENTERTAINMENT
August 12, 2013 | By Susan King
Singer-actress Ann Blyth loves her fans. So much so that Blyth's been personally answering her fan mail for nearly 70 years. "I get mail from all around the world," noted Blyth, who turns 85 on Friday. "I am so thankful to read their sweet notes and letters. " Though the fans write to her about her glorious soprano in movie musicals such as 1955's "Kismet," her deft comedic timing in farces like 1949's "Mr. Peabody and the Mermaid" and her credible dramatic turns in films such as 1952's "One Minute to Zero," there is one movie that dominates the letters - the 1945 film noir classic "Mildred Pierce.
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HEALTH
September 29, 1997 | CANDACE A. WEDLAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
How did Ann Blyth manage to co-star in an entire movie without saying one word? "Playing opposite William Powell and looking into those wonderful blue eyes of his, it was completely believable," Blyth said about her voiceless role in "Mr. Peabody and the Mermaid" (1948). During a recent phone interview, she recalled that acting without benefit of dialogue was easy--especially with her leading man--compared with negotiating the mermaid's heavy costume. "I got to be quite the fish, I must say.
HEALTH
September 29, 1997 | CANDACE A. WEDLAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
How did Ann Blyth manage to co-star in an entire movie without saying one word? "Playing opposite William Powell and looking into those wonderful blue eyes of his, it was completely believable," Blyth said about her voiceless role in "Mr. Peabody and the Mermaid" (1948). During a recent phone interview, she recalled that acting without benefit of dialogue was easy--especially with her leading man--compared with negotiating the mermaid's heavy costume. "I got to be quite the fish, I must say.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 28, 1985 | JACK HAWN
A waiter led the way--skirting the edge of the busy dining room and on through an iron-grate opening to a secluded nook, where a single VIP table had been reserved. Ann Blyth had insisted on the Brown Derby for lunch because, she said, she yearned for a Cobb salad, a specialty created by former owner Bob Cobb half a century ago. But it was more than the salad that appealed to the actress.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 12, 2013 | By Susan King
Singer-actress Ann Blyth loves her fans. So much so that Blyth's been personally answering her fan mail for nearly 70 years. "I get mail from all around the world," noted Blyth, who turns 85 on Friday. "I am so thankful to read their sweet notes and letters. " Though the fans write to her about her glorious soprano in movie musicals such as 1955's "Kismet," her deft comedic timing in farces like 1949's "Mr. Peabody and the Mermaid" and her credible dramatic turns in films such as 1952's "One Minute to Zero," there is one movie that dominates the letters - the 1945 film noir classic "Mildred Pierce.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 18, 1996 | JOSEF WOODARD, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
If you believe what you read and hear--especially from news sources--pop music is a primarily young person's game. Chalk it up to the youth-orientation of the media and the pop-culture machine. But in the San Fernando Valley, entertainment options for older audiences are surprisingly plentiful of late. Friday night at the Alex Theatre, as part of the big band series there, the "Stars of the Lawrence Welk Show" will tap into the fan base of Welkies.
NEWS
February 13, 1990
Frank McFadden, 75, a pioneer publicist who polished the images of businesses ranging from Lawry's Foods to Marineland of the Pacific while representing such entertainment personalities as Anthony Quinn, Ann Blyth, Aaron Spelling, Audie Murphy, Carolyn Jones and many more. He began as a messenger at Warner Bros. studios after graduating from Fremont High School in Los Angeles. From Warner Bros.
NEWS
June 8, 1995
Harper MacKay, 73, composer, conductor, arranger, pianist and musical director for films and television as well as such artists as Ann Blyth, Sammy Cahn and Phyllis Diller. A native of Boston, MacKay earned his undergraduate degree at Harvard and a doctorate in music from USC. From 1962 to 1980, he was the musical director for the Los Angeles Civic Light Opera Music Theater Workshop.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 18, 1996 | JOSEF WOODARD, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
If you believe what you read and hear--especially from news sources--pop music is a primarily young person's game. Chalk it up to the youth-orientation of the media and the pop-culture machine. But in the San Fernando Valley, entertainment options for older audiences are surprisingly plentiful of late. Friday night at the Alex Theatre, as part of the big band series there, the "Stars of the Lawrence Welk Show" will tap into the fan base of Welkies.
NEWS
October 14, 1994 | LIBBY SLATE, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES; Libby Slate is a regular contributor to The Times.
When John Raitt and Ann Blyth sing together for the first time Sunday in the "Show of the Month" series at the Academy Plaza Theatre, they will bring a total of more than 100 years of musical film and theater performing experience to the stage. Raitt, 77, first made his mark in 1945 as rough-hewn barker Billy Bigelow in Rodgers and Hammerstein's Broadway classic "Carousel," after replacing star Alfred Drake as Curly in the national company of "Oklahoma!"
ENTERTAINMENT
February 28, 1985 | JACK HAWN
A waiter led the way--skirting the edge of the busy dining room and on through an iron-grate opening to a secluded nook, where a single VIP table had been reserved. Ann Blyth had insisted on the Brown Derby for lunch because, she said, she yearned for a Cobb salad, a specialty created by former owner Bob Cobb half a century ago. But it was more than the salad that appealed to the actress.
NEWS
January 18, 1996 | David Brady and Jon Markman
MATURE AUDIENCES: Younger, louder acts may get all the attention, but there's a growing number of shows geared to the over-45 crowd (F1A)..."Our whole idea has always been to cater to the older audience," says promoter Keith Evans...Upcoming shows at Cal State Northridge will feature Anthony Newley, Ann Blyth and John Raitt. BARGAINS: How do you clothe your kids without losing your shirt? Resale, says bargain columnist Geri Cook. She calls it "the smart shopper's answer to children's stuff." ...
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